87 Photos - Jun 10, 2013
Photo: Here is the high maintenance, fossil fuel intensive side.Photo: Here is the low maintenance, compost in situ, sustainable side.Photo: Notice that the eucalyptus here have multiple shoots from each trunk. They are re-sprouts.Photo: Removing all the eucalypti and treating the stumps with herbicide will allow the stunted trees here to thrive.Photo: This area was thinned a few years ago. See the native trees in the background.Photo: Mixed and managed.Photo: Here begins the eradicated area. look at how much healthier and vibrant the stick monkey flower is compared to under the eucalypti.Photo: Young natives trees among the eucalypti stumpsPhoto: This are right next to it, the eucalypti were eradicated.Photo: Photo: Here is mixed growth on the other side of the road.Photo: Here is the thinned and managed eucalyptus.Photo: Photo: Fog drip here on the ridge means vigorous growth of the french broom under the canopy of these eucalypti.Photo: Here is what managed eucalyptus looks likePhoto: Photo: Photo: The restored canyon over a failed attempt at weed control along the shoulder.Photo: Here is what the ground looks like under an unmanaged (within 5 years) oak across the road.Photo: Eucalyptus logs make a nice highway berm between the shoulder and the restoration area.Photo: Photo: Anyone know if this is a coffeeberry?Photo: The greenery on the right is French broom and eucalyptus.Photo: I startled a raptor out of this oak.Photo: Both French broom and poison oak do very well next to eucalyptus.Photo: Bay trees also compete well for space under the thin eucalyptus canopy.Photo: Photo: As is quite evidence here, any ground fire will rapidly become a crown fire under dry conditions.Photo: The four corners from the top of Sign post 25 restoration area.Photo: Photo: How invitingPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: More eucalyptus and french broomPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: This is much more manageable than the euc's across the streetPhoto: Coast live oak is the way to go. They are about as fire resistant as a tree can get. And they don't consume as much water in the summer as the exotic eucalyptus.Photo: This picture provides a great contrast.Photo: Restoration on the left. See the California buckeye in bloom?Photo: Invasive weeds take over any clear spot. Continuous maintenance is necessary for any mitigation strategy.Photo: Eucalyptus frequently drop large branchs.Photo: Thinning has allowed this bay and oak a chance to grow. The soil is alive under the bay and oak. The native microbes are dead unfer the eucalyptus.
Eradicating the eucalyptus will allow this to be a thriving woodland ecosystem.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: See the stunted natives under the eucalypti?
Don't believe the lie that removing the invasives is clear cutting. It is what we gardeners call weeding!Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Poison oak thrives under eucalyptus. Sometimes, it completely takes over when the tall trees are gone.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: In five years those trees will be 30 feet taller and dropping bark and leaves on the natives below.Photo: Photo: Photo: