169 Photos - Jun 6, 2013
Photo: Coast redwoods are superior to any exotic at condensing water from the fog. They were the first tree discovered that actually does reverse transpiration. The fog enters the stomata, and is drawn down into the tree roots.Photo: These trees were once under the eucalyptus canopy.Photo: The brush could use clearing this summerPhoto: Eucalyptus stumpPhoto: Redwood seedlingPhoto: Another stumpPhoto: Redwood saplingsPhoto: Grass and thistlePhoto: Poison hemlockPhoto: Field of dry bull thistle and grassesPhoto: The redwoodsPhoto: Very weedy, this site could use more volunteersPhoto: In the middle of the afternoon, the sun's been shining for hours, and the ground is still wet under the redwoods from the fog last night.Photo: Redwood understoryPhoto: Eucalyptus branches from when they were cut down a few years ago.Photo: Even though this is a nicely stacked pile of kindling, because it is under the redwoods, the wood is soggyPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Wet path under redwoodPhoto: Native understoryPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: You never see rich diverse growth like this in eucalyptus litter.Photo: Photo: Photo: Eucalyptus stumpPhoto: The trunks make great trail bordersPhoto: Photo: The restoration plan is on site disposal/use of the trees cut down.Photo: Sticky monkey flower. The native Americans used it as an antiseptic ointment for scrapes and burns.Photo: This stump was cut once during an earlier attempt at managing the eucalyptus. Without treating the cambium layer of the stump, eucalyptus are like hydras. They re-sprout many shoots that will grow 6 feet a year. Cut one today, and in 20 years, you can have a dozen or more 100 foot trees in it's place.Photo: All of these stumps were treated treated with herbicide. The herbicide is applied directly to the stump. There is little risk of it getting into the water shed. In areas near creeks, the stumps can be covered with a tarp after being treated.Photo: Logs left for erosion control and habitat.Photo: A redwood seedling where once there was only eucalyptus duff.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Path is still wet under this young redwood from fog drip, in the middle of the day.Photo: Not the best use of the branches and logsPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Wet steps beneath a redwood saplingPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Oak seedlingsPhoto: Photo: The trees are small, the eucalypti have only been gone a few years.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: UC Berkeley would like to do the same for the stunted native understory beneath the eucalypti seen here in the background.Photo: Photo: The eucalyptus forest across the road is targeted for restoration. A small group of fanatics has been fighting this restoration.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: That one is ripe.Photo: TrilliumPhoto: Photo: TrilliumsPhoto: Native blackberriesPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Poison oak berriesPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: The greenery on the right is French broom and eucalyptus.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Looking out over the liberated woodland.Photo: East side of Grizzly Peak. Four eucalyptus stumps from a partial removal.Photo: More recovering natives on Grizzly Peak. The eucalyptus and French broom are to the left.Photo: Eucalypti and French broom.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: