167 Photos - Jul 25, 2013
Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: A large rock monument bearing a sign in Chinese that reads 'The Home Town of Rare Earths Welcomes You' is seen amongst a field of wind turbines near the town of Damao, located in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. China supplies 97 percent of rare earths used worldwide, and they go into magnets, bearings and high-tech components that go into computers, vehicles and, increasingly, clean energy technology such as wind turbines and hybrid cars. Picture taken October 31, 2010. TO MATCH STORY CHINA-RAREEARTHS/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: On June 16, 2011, workers at Portage Casting and Mold Inc. in Portage, Wis., use an overhead crane to position and assemble parts a five-section-mold before pouring more than 7,000 pounds of molten aluminum into a cast that will form one of two nine-meter-diameter hemispheres needed for the main vacuum vessel of the Plasma Dynamo Facility being installed at Sterling Hall at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Using $2.4 million in stimulus funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the experiment is a continuation of research studying the origin of magnetic fields in the universe and exploring the self-generation of magnetic fields in a plasma dynamo as a potential energy source. The Plasma Dynamo Facility is co-led by UW-Madison physics professor Cary Forest and astronomy professor Ellen Zweibel. (Photo by Jeff Miller/UW-Madison)Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: On June 16, 2011, workers at Portage Casting and Mold Inc. in Portage, Wis., use an overhead crane to position and assemble parts a five-section-mold before pouring more than 7,000 pounds of molten aluminum into a cast that will form one of two nine-meter-diameter hemispheres needed for the main vacuum vessel of the Plasma Dynamo Facility being installed at Sterling Hall at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Using $2.4 million in stimulus funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the experiment is a continuation of research studying the origin of magnetic fields in the universe and exploring the self-generation of magnetic fields in a plasma dynamo as a potential energy source. The Plasma Dynamo Facility is co-led by UW-Madison physics professor Cary Forest and astronomy professor Ellen Zweibel. (Photo by Jeff Miller/UW-Madison)Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Doha, 27 luglio 2009. Le Zig-Zag towers, complesso residenziale nella zona nord della capitale. Gli edifici dalla caratteristica forma non sono ancora pronti e forse dovranno essere abbattuti per difetti di costruzione.Photo: Photo: Photo: Land Rover 110 Defender, low enviromental impact expedition vehicle. SEMA 2009 in Las Vegas Nevada.Photo: Photo: The Helically Symmetric eXperiment, or HSX, is pictured in Engineering Hall at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on Dec. 7, 2010. HSX is a fusion-energy experiment that uses powerful magnetic fields to both confine and drive plasma -- a conductive state of matter similar to gas but containing ionized particles -- through a stellarator, a spherical device shaped like a twisted doughnut with a three-dimensional magnetic field. The experiment has received from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a grant totaling $5.1 million over three years to expand research of fusion-energy processes.©UW-Madison University Communications 608/262-0067Photo by: Jeff MillerDate:  12/10    File#:  NIKON D3 digital frame 3166Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Modulare Spulen (blau) und Plasma (gelb) des Wendelstein 7-XPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: DCF 1.0Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: