146 Photos - Oct 19, 2014
Photo: Ready to roll - loaded these up Tuesday evening and then took off Wednesday afternoon to take care of the shuttle (5 boats, 7 people).Photo: Our canoe trip started at Coal Banks (70 miles NE of Great Falls), and ended at Judith Landing. We started on the river at 9:20 Thursday morning and got off the river at about 2 pm Saturday.  We spent the first night at Eagle Creek and the second at Slaughter River. Both places have nice pit toilets. The trip was 47 river miles.Photo: Starting point - Coal Banks is 70 miles NE of Great Falls (nearest town is Big Sandy)Photo: We pushed off from Judith Landing at 9:20 Thursday morning. Kelli, Lamph, Barnes, Tim, Sam, KaceyPhoto: Photo by Tim. (TRB)Photo: The photos in this album are in chronological order.Photo: This is Kelli in her 12-ft kayak. She put some of her gear in the larger vessels used by others in the group.Photo: Lamp and Barnes.Photo: Photo by TRBPhoto: The start of the cliffs - a few miles into our trip.Photo: Tim in his 14-ft canoe.Photo: Kacey and his son, SamPhoto: Lunch stop on Thursday.Photo: View up river from lunch spotPhoto: War Eagle (Tim), Barnes, LamphPhoto: A little hike after lunch.Photo: Hike to bluff above our lunch spotPhoto: Photo by TRBPhoto: and then back downPhoto: Headed back to the river - that bluff is in backgroundPhoto: About 100 yards downriver from our lunch spot.Photo: Photo by TRBPhoto: Photo: Yours truly - Photo by TRBPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Approaching the Eagle Creek CampgroundPhoto: My kinda beach - Arrival at Eagle Creek CampgroundPhoto: Setting up camp before we go hikingPhoto: After setting up camp, we hiked up through Neat Coulee and explored the box canyon.Photo: Start of one of the coolest hikes in the state.Photo: Photo: Photo: Box Canyon in Neat CouleePhoto: Photo: Photo by KaceyPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo by TRB - Between a rock and a hard place.Photo: Photo: War Eagle above the box canyon we just hiked throughPhoto: We came up through the canyon to Kelli's right and went back through the canyon on her left.  The river can be seen in the background.Photo: Neat Coulee is pretty darn neat!Photo: Photo: Photo by TRB - Heading up to the arch.Photo: Photo: Camel Arch - Can you see the camel's head?Photo: Photo: Fearsome FoursomePhoto: Photo: War EaglePhoto: BarnesPhoto: Concretion . . . 
There are several places in and along the white cliffs where you can see great examples of concretions. A concretion (like the one shown in this photos) is roughly spherical mass sandstone embedded in less durable sandstone. Concretions form within layers of sandstone that have already been deposited, usually before the rest of the sand has hardened into rock. The "concretionary cement" often makes the concretion harder and more resistant to weathering than the rock it is embedded in.

They form when a mineral precipitates and cements sediment around a nucleus, which is often organic, such as a leaf, tooth, piece of shell or fossil. For this reason, fossil collectors commonly break open concretions in their search for fossil animal and plant specimens.Photo: Photo: Heading back from the canyons Thursday afternoon - Next up: Eagle Creek drainagePhoto: Photo by TRB - Thursday around 4 pm, Snack time between afternoon hikes.Photo: Photo by TRB - Off to explore the Eagle Creek drainagePhoto: Exploring the Eagle Creek Drainage before dinner Thursday. That little stream on the left side of the photo is Eagle Creek, which starts in the Bears Paw Mountains south of Havre. The darker spherical rocks embedded in the lighter sandstone are called "concretions".Photo: Above Eagle CreekPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo by TRB - Concretions everywherePhoto: Photo: Back down to Eagle Creek and the campgroundPhoto: Photo: Photo: That's me - photo by TRBPhoto: Campfire topics included the space station, celebrity sitings, aliens, and the movie "Deliverance"Photo: Saturday morning I hiked up above the valley to give Mardi a call - got this nice view of the Bear Paws (Bear Paw Baldy is the highest - near right side of range)Photo: Saturday morning breakfast club at Eagle Creek CampgroundPhoto: Photo by TRB - Breakfast Friday morningPhoto: I decided to sleep under the stars Thursday night - bad idea (see next photo).Photo: Frost on my kayakPhoto: Photo: Kelli on Friday morning - just downriver from Eagle CreekPhoto: Citadel RockPhoto: Getting ready for the race to see who had the fastest boatPhoto: Photo: Approaching The Hole in the Wall - photo by KaceyPhoto: Photo by TRBPhoto: On the way up to the Hole in the Wall - about noon on FridayPhoto: Photo: Slot canyon on way up to Hole in the WallPhoto: Photo by TRB - Above the holePhoto: Photo by TRB - Looking downriver from the holePhoto: Exploring the area below the HolePhoto: On ledge above the Hole - photo by KaceyPhoto: Photo: Photo by TRB - You can see the hole below and left of me.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo of me taking the previous photo - by TRBPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo by TRBPhoto: Hole in the Wall GangPhoto: Ascending from the Hole in the wallPhoto: Side trip near Hole in the WallPhoto: Photo by TRBPhoto: Lunch after climb to the Hole (in background)Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Approaching the Archangel and Dark ButtePhoto: Photo: Photo by TRBPhoto: Photo: Takin a break and goin with the flow.Photo: Short climb late Friday afternoon just before arriving at our campsite - Can you see the two canoes approaching (tiny specks)?Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Kacey and Sam opted to explore the ranch - Barnes and Lamph decided to follow me.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Next stop - Just around the bend at Slaughter River CampsitePhoto: 21miles on the river today - arrival at Slaughter River Campground (photo by Kacey)Photo: Setting up my tent at the Slaughter River Campground on Friday evening - Photo by TRBPhoto: Photo by TRBPhoto: Friday evening - Tim, Kelli, Lamph, Barnes, Sam, KaceyPhoto: Sunrise Saturday morningPhoto: Coffee and breakfast before our hike on Saturday morningPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Some beachPhoto: Taking down camp on Saturday morningPhoto: Photo: Photo: Lunch spotPhoto: Photo: End of a great trip - To read the blog post about this trip, go to . . . 
https://bigskywalker.com/Photo: Seven Sisters - because it looks like a bunch of nuns standing around. We hiked up there in October of 2015, but not on this trip in 2014.Photo: The red line marks the 47-mile stretch of the Missouri River that we canoed. Coal Banks is a 165-mile drive from Helena. The headwaters of the Missouri River are about 60 miles south of Helena, near the town of Three Forks.