839 Photos - Jun 22, 2013
Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
This moth only stayed on the lamp while it was lit so the ‘flash’ was only partially successful in showing the marks: a distinctive outline should make identification easy, but an still unsure – I suspect a Common Wave.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
The drizzle adds sparkle to these forget-me-knots: the precise identification eludes me as the habitat suggests Water Forget-me-not but the absence of teeth on the calyx suggests Wood Forget-me-not (see: I have invested in a proper Flora and have become intelligently confused!)
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Don’t get me started on grasses ...
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
... but they do look attractive with a patina of water droplets
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
As for this umbellifer: hmmm. All the flowers in the heads have 5 well-separated petals whereas most species show denser clustering at the centre of the head. Also the heads that are yet to open fully are quite pink-toned .... 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
I showed this fly before: but ... 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
 ... this gives a different perspective. Does not make it easier to identify! ... 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
 nor does this!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
The closest I could get early on: dad (?) on the left, arrives with a fish for one or more juveniles riding on mum’s (?) back on the right. But how many? 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Plume moths are hard: they have modified wings with a spar and bristles that fold up and provide a distinct shape and leave very little clue as to their identity. This is, I think, Triangle Plume (Platyptilia gonodactyl) 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Another nightmare group – grass moths. With the clear lateral stripe and the marks at the trailing edge of the wing it seems to be Hook-streaked Grass-veneer (Crambus lathoniellus)
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Avenue:
At least a bird! Strange behaviour when a family party of Nuthatches flew across Priorslee Avenue and one of the juveniles chose to pause on a TV antenna! Cannot recall anything like this before – usually just trees – or bird-tables! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Flash:
Anyone got a biology degree? why can different parts of a spider thread support different-sized water droplets?
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Flash:
A Greylag Goose gets down to breakfast on one of the iris leaves!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Flash:
No good begging for food from me: juveniles now with weird-looking feet but at least they are not while like their parents’ feet
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Flash:
A Common Wave moth – can be identified as a male by the feathered antenna. The amount of feathering varies from species to species but is always more pronounced in males as they use them to scent the pheromones given off by females
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Avenue tunnel:
This Common Marbled Carpet moth was resting on the roof of the Priorslee Avenue tunnel. A very variable species with several confusion species possible but not in this rather infrequent brown form
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
When there was more light it was no easier to see ‘under the covers’
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
A caddis fly: to positively identify needs examination of the legs to count the spurs but on size would seem to be a Phryanea grandis and with the strength of the wing markings the larger female of the species.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
This was one a number of apparently newly-emerged damselflies resting / drying out on the railings around the sluice on the dam
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Also on the railings were several of these, I assume, green egg-clusters. No idea! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
When I saw these in the same area I assumed they were stoneflies, but looking at the photos they have very large eyes and would seem to be emergent damselflies yet to ‘pump-up’
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
The micro moth Common Marble (Celypha lacunana) 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
What progress on the Giant Hogweed!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
 this: but ... 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
 A buttercup that is quite different in form from
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
This is intermediate and suggests that the first will gradually open 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
This Coot is either very heavy or the buoy has a puncture! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Trench Lock Pool:
This Coot is taking advantage of the rubbish thrown in to Trench Lock Pool: but I must discourage placing shopping trolleys as potential ‘nesting boxes’! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Trench Lock Pool:
One of the Swans at Trench: come in ‘00C’ 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Trench Lock Pool:
Adult Canada Geese with 4 well-grown goslings at Trench Lock: still unfledged and had eluded me on previous visits
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jun 13
Priorslee Flash:
The duck Mallard leads 4 of her off-spring on a formation fly-by (the other 6 were also in the air)
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Two Black-headed Gulls over the lake: despite having black heads (well chocolate hoods actually) the dark tail tip shows these are 1st summer birds. Note on both birds at least the 2 inner primaries on each wing have been dropped. New adult feathers will soon replace them.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
A rather lethargic bee sp. inside one of the Yellow Flag Irises (Iris pseudacorus) this morning: seemed to be just feeling the cold rather than unwell (me too!). The long antenna suggests a male bee. Despite its size and shape I am not entirely convinced it is a bumble bee as the head seems well-separated from the body and the wings seem larger than usual and extend well beyond the body. Perhaps the ‘tail’ is curled under and giving a false impression.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
The leaf mines here were probably made by the larvae of the Golden Pigmy (Stigmella aurella) moth, though they are usually seen on Brambles (Rubus sp.) – not entirely sure what this is a leaf of: it looked like an umbellifer leaf, but I could find no stem for any ‘umbels’. And I wonder whether the blotchy area is caused by a different larva sp.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
The weather almost looked promising ...
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
The weather almost looked promising ...
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
... and was in the water for no more than 30 seconds ....
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
... and back ‘on-board’ and snuggled in the warm.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
A different Giant Hogweed flower: for years there were 3 plants at the lake: 2 on the E edge of the SW small copse; and 1 in the Wesley Brook near the footbridge. Perhaps because the Severn-Trent contractors cleared out the brook and opened it up to more light this area now has at least 9 of the monsters.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
About 48 hours too late for the ‘supermoon’, but certainly impressive if slight lop-sided as it starts to wane
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
A calm, hazy and red start to the day
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Here are the 13 Cormorants over at 04:30 from ? to? 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Cinnabar moth on one of the lamps: perhaps the spiders know these are poisonous.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Close-up snail: probably a Yellow-lipped Snail but did not look!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Common Marbled Carpet on one of the lamps. Compare with the one photographed in the tunnel last Thursday (20th): this is a more typical example.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
This is the micro moth Pammene regiana (Regal Piercer) that feeds on Sycamore trees.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Priorslee Flash:
This drake Tufted Duck is showing just 2 darker feathers in its flanks as it start to moult in to eclipse plumage: whereas. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Priorslee Flash:
This drake is well into eclipse plumage and lost most of its tuft. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Priorslee Flash:
All 8 cygnets present and correct.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Priorslee Flash:
More red trousers: a male Great Spotted Woodpecker – the red on the nape just visible.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Woodhouse Lane:
Woodhouse Lane in mid-summer.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Woodhouse Lane:
Foxgloves (Digitalis purpurea) in the lane.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Woodhouse Lane:
Greater Stitchwort (Stellaria holostea) in close-up just past its prime. Main ID feature is that each of the 5 petals is split to halfway making it seem 10-petalled at a glance.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Woodhouse Lane:
And in close-up.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Woodhouse Lane:
And from the perspective of a bee about to go after the nectar (though I suspect bees would see it rather differently as they almost certainly have eyes with sensitivity to a different spectrum from our. Whatever, it works!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Woodhouse Lane:
Bee nectaring at a vetch sp. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Woodhouse Lane:
And bees were very active at these flowers: my reading of the literature identifies the plant as Tuberous Comfrey (Symphytum tuberosum) and probably originally a ‘garden-escape’, so likely from the frequent fly-tipping in the lane.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Woodhouse Lane:
Once again a bees-eye view.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Woodhouse Lane:
A busy bee: just look at that pollen sac! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Woodhouse Lane:
A female Bullfinch thinks about falling / flying off!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Woodhouse Lane:
A Common Whitethroat fresh from the shower!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Woodhouse Lane:
Certainly rather soggy!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Woodhouse Lane:
Fearsome close up and glad I am not a small fly: a female Common Blue(!) Damselfly.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Woodhouse Lane:
In all its glory.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Woodhouse Lane:
A Buzzard in full cry atop the pylon. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Woodhouse Lane:
Another fearsome looking fly: it is probably a Flesh-fly (Sarcophaga carnaria). Even the scientific name is evil! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Woodhouse Lane:
No excuse for another Common Spotted Orchid: this near the sluice exit.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Woodhouse Lane:
To complete the quartet of bees feasting here is an ox-eye bee!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Woodhouse Lane:
And for a change a hoverfly doing the same at a rose flower: note the small green aphid: one that isn’t on your garden roses!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Aren't bees wonderful in close-up. All furry and you want to stroke them. You don’t? No soul.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
A rare site at the moment: a Song Thrush with its mouth closed.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Are you looking at me? a juvenile Blue Tit. It will take some weeks to lose its yellow tones and rather ‘blurred’ plumage.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
If you look hard there are three juveniles in there!(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
And 2 after a meal from Dad while a third looks on.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
A pristine Speckled Wood butterfly.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Its waning......
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
A different species of grass moth: this is Garden Grass-veneer (Chrysoteuchia culmella) and just to make things hard it is the dark form which hides some of the usual ID features!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
A particularly fine specimen of Common White Wave on one of the lamps.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
A particularly fine specimen of White Ermine moth on the same lamp ...
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Joined a few minutes later by a caterpillar. Green caterpillars are a nightmare: looks like one of the ‘white’ butterflies, but ... Presumably climbing to pupate.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
A rather less-fine specimen, also a Common White Wave: a rather ragged male and rather faded making separation from Common Wave harder, but the shape of the faint cross-lines is diagnostic.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Early cloud cleared to leave a rather angry-looking sky.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jun 13
Priorslee Avenue tunnel:
This moth was resting on one of the few functioning lights in the Priorslee Avenue tunnel: it is the rather unusual dark form of Clouded-bordered Brindle (Apamea crenata) which is a new moth for me.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
One of the drake Tufted Ducks leaving the lake: it, or another, returned later.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
From this angle this looks a benign bug: but ...
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
 ... less so from the business end. I think it is a Common Green Capsid (Lygocoris pabulinus) which is, like most capsid and myrid bugs, a herbivore. A nagging doubt that it seemed rather larger than the illustration in the Collins guide to the Insects of Britain and Western Europe – a guide with a generally well-chosen selection of what are most likely to be seen by the casual observer.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Not the sharpest photo I have ever taken but this shows the yellow-tones of juvenile Chiffchaff. Here the feet are clearly pink – while most Chiffchaffs have dark legs the feet are usually pale. A juvenile Willow Warbler would be a brighter yellow and the supercilium more defined. What you can’t see in the photo was the tail being characteristically dipped as it worked through the foliage.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Not a bee! Holding the wings out at rest provided the clue. It is in fact a hover-fly, Volucella bombylans. You can just see that the left antenna is characteristically quite hairy (the right-hand antenna is at the wrong angle). It is a very variable species of bumble bee mimic and has no sting.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
The older family of Great Crested Grebes: the juvenile is now quite large but still begs noisily from pre-dawn.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
It is not obvious what these are doing. No: let’s clarify that. It is very obvious what these are doing and no wildlife programme would be complete without a mating sequence! It is just that they are rather more hidden in the vegetation than I would have liked.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 27 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Sunrise ... 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 27 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
... progresses ... 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 27 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
... “red sky in the morning ...” 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 27 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
You can see the moult progression on this (near?) adult Lesser Black-backed Gull. The outer 4 primaries are old – indeed P4 seems about to drop. The next few primaries are missing but the next 6 feathers are all new, not yet fully grown. Then there is at least one secondary missing [primaries moult in succession towards the wing-tip: secondaries in succession towards the body. The inner primary and outer secondary are lost first, usually together].
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 27 Jun 13
Priorslee Flash:
The Swans at the lake decided to explore dry land in Derwent Drive! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 27 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
This Lesser Black-backed Gull shows why the moult is needed: just look at the state of those wing feathers, all ragged and worn. It has just started the moult with the inner primary, at least, lost. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 27 Jun 13
Priorslee Flash:
All birds moult: this Sparrowhawk is re-growing primary P4 (care: P1 is very short).
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 27 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Mallard too are in moult. Ducks typically lose all their flight feathers at once and hence even the drakes get ‘sombre’ plumage while they are essentially flightless. Here are 3 such Mallard drakes – you can tell they are drakes, whatever the plumage, by their wholly green/yellow bill. A duck has a brown bill with brighter edging. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 27 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Another splendid little moth: Yellow-barred Longhorn (Nemophora degeerella).
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 27 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Another scorpion fly: with fewer spots on the wings this may be Panorpa germanica (rather than Panorpa communis), but examination of the genitalia is required to confirm!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 27 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
 In real close-up! Bugs really are quite fascinating when you can examine them closely from afar! This is a very long-winged specimen whose colour reminded me of a dung-fly and I was surprised to find that is exactly what it is - Yellow Dung Fly (Scathophaga stercoraria) – even though there are no cattle or horses nearby to produce dung. The males are carnivorous and also drink nectar. It is the females that seek cow-pats to lay their eggs.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 27 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Another view of a different specimen.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 27 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Was pleased to find this flower: it is Yellow Rattle (Rhinanthus minor) which takes its name from the hard seeds that will form inside a papery brown calyx and rattle in the breeze. It is it is hemi-parasitic, gaining some of its nutrients from the roots of grasses and becoming scarce on farmland where it would typically be cut before the seeds have set.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 27 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Two youngsters nearly fall off the female Great Crested Grebe to grab the food brought by the male! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 27 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
While two Coots still dispute territory.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 27 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
This is another Volucella bombylans hoverfly, but this individual shows a white tail.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 27 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
I wondered about these ‘red spots’ on this Sycamore leaf. Eggs? Galls? The interweb tells me they are red pustule galls and caused by the mite Aceria macrorhynchus so it must be true. It leaves me little the wiser! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 27 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
A closer view.....
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 29 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
A red sky before it clouded over completely.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 29 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
The 14 Cormorants pass over.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 29 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
What are you going to do with that fish ...
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 29 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Let the youngsters fight over it .. but its is bigger than they are and they drop it ...
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 29 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
And dad has to retrieve it!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 29 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
The tail seems to be sticking out of one of the juveniles here!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 29 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Here dad seems to be retrieving it from a choking juvenile. Not sure what happened next!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 29 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Two juvenile Wood Pigeons centre-stage: note no neck pattern and rather palter plumage. Does not show here but they have strikingly pale feet!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 29 Jun 13
Priorslee Flash:
Been after one of these for a while: the very pale form of Blue Flag Iris. At The Flash the previous flower was where I could not get an angle for a photo: but another flower in this delicate colour has emerged
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 29 Jun 13
Priorslee Flash:
On the left a juvenile Moorhen: on the right I assume its parent but it shows no red shield even though otherwise in adult plumage.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 29 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Juvenile Pied Wagtail on the dam: just a hint of the yellow gape even though this bird was fully independent. In the photo seems to have a deformed leg, but was not obvious as it moved around.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 29 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
A rather scruffy juvenile Chiffchaff: note the pale tips to the primaries. The legs are dark at this stage, not black. But the supercilium is rather indistinct and the plumage too olive for Willow Warbler: juveniles of this species can be startlingly yellow!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 30 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
A Buff Ermine moth on one of the lamps at the lake.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 30 Jun 13
Priorslee Flash:
Doves on the left; pigeon on the right. Generally doves (represented here by Collared Doves) are smaller and neater than pigeons (here a Wood Pigeon). Stock Dove is an exception or misnamed as it is almost Wood Pigeon-sized.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 30 Jun 13
Priorslee Flash:
A splendid Peppered Moth on one of the lamps at The Flash: seems it is too large for the spiders that seem to have had a field day with all the midges!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 30 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
A head of Self Heal (Prunella vulgaris) on the dam. Named for its supposed properties as both an antibiotic as well as in healing cuts. But no guarantees from me!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 30 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
A so-called mating wheel of Common Blue Damselflies – the male is blue! Claspers on his ‘tail’ grip the female’s neck just like Lord Saatchi is alleged to have done. Here the female responds positively!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 30 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
This is the very small and inconspicuous flower of Cleavers (Galium aparine), that ‘sticky’ creeping plant that gets everywhere. You can see the hooked ‘hairs’ on the stem that enables it to attach itself to anything passing and even small bits of the plant are able to root and develop. Apparently edible and it is closely related to “goosegrass” which goose do indeed like to eat.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 30 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Here is a head of Ragwort (Senecio jacobaea, formerly Jacobaea vulgaris) flowers about to open. It is poisonous to horses (causes liver failure) and won’t do you much good either. Will soon be invaded by Cinnabar caterpillars with their yellow and black rugby-shirt hoops – these are able to break down the toxins but in so doing become distasteful to birds and other potential predators.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 30 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
These flowers are all around the lake, especially on the dam. Herb-Robert (Geranium robertianum) and ...
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 30 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
... these are the seed heads that give it one of its other many vernacular names of Storksbill. Its name is apparently derived from folklore’s “Robin Goodfellow” (aka Puck!) who was a protector of the flowers for their healing properties.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 30 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
This different pair have yet to ‘get it together’.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 30 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
The Giant Hogweed lives up to its name – HUGE
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 30 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
I have shown photos of the attractive micro moth Common Marble (Celypha lacunana), but this view shows just what an attractive moth it is in close-up.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 30 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
I have also shown a photo of this micro moth Timothy Tortrix (Aphelia paleana) before but again this fresh specimen reveals some spotting and shading. Both these moths are freely disturbed from grassy areas but are small (wingspan c.20 mm)
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 30 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Hoverfly Leucozona lucorum, which is new for me at the lake. Supposedly an indication that Spring has arrived as they usually appear on the first warm days in May and are found in the vicinity of Greater Stitchwort (Stellaria holostea) and Red Campion (Silene dioica). Both of these are still in flower. This attractive hoverfly is not often seen on flowers – it normally is seen hovering just above head-height.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 30 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
See!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 30 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
A Smooth sow-thistle or milk-thistle (Sonchus oleraceus) head: a very common weed.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A promising start.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A slug sp. tucks in to breakfast of a Bramble (Rubus sp.) flower head. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Meanwhile a Yellow-lipped Snail goes its own way. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
 “get off my car”!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Neatly wrapped by a spider but still identifiable as a the humuli (yellow) form of Ghost Moth (so Hepialus humuli humuli). 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
 A close-up of the flowers of Hedge Woundwort (Stachys sylvatica).
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
Here is the head showing it is rather similar to Red Deadnettle but the flowers of that species lack the large lip.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Two Swifts over the lake.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
One Swift and two House Martins: don’t ask me to do this again! Note difference in size as well as structure. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A pair of Tufted Duck fly through. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Two Buzzards act as ‘bookends’ on the middle cross-bar of the pylon. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A party of 5 Rooks: note the heavy wing-moult shown well by plan view of the last bird.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
This is Meadowsweet (Filipepedula ulmaria) with dense clusters of creamy-white flowers. Strangely this is in the Rose family. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
A weevil sp. (you can tell by the prominent snout). Probably a Polydrusus sp.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
Amazing in close-up! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
I told you that Foxglove (Digitalis purpurea) was attractive to bees: probably a White-tailed Bumble-bee (Bombus lucorum). 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
A hoverfly sp.: rather strangely it seemed to ignore the flowering heads of this umbellifer and went straight to the developing seeds. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
The first Honeysuckle, also known as Woodbine, (Lonicera periclymenum) flower about to open.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
And my first Rosebay Willowherb (Chamerion angustifolium), also known as Fireweed due to swathes appearing on railway embankments in the days these were subjected to controlled burning to avoid the stream trains causing uncontrolled fires.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
This is Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium). It is used to alleviate migraine. Here it almost certainly a naturalised garden escape. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
 I have always called this flower ‘Alkanet’ and indeed it may be Green Alkanet (Pentaglottis sempervirens) but the unopened flowers of that species are usually pink.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
The male Great Crested Grebe is retrieving the part of the proffered fish that was too large for the juvenile who is busy swallowing the piece it managed to bite off! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
And heading straight back to join its two siblings in the safety of mum’s back. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 1 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Clambering back.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 2 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Street-lights still on, but the sky is colouring ...
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 2 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
“Shepherd’s warning”! at full strength. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 2 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
So a dramatic start to the day but you had to be up at 04:40!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 2 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
Biting Stonecrop or Wallpepper (Sedum acre): common in rocky places and here growing in the gaps in the wall along Derwent Drive at The Flash. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 2 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A Common Green Capsid (Lygocoris pabulinus).
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 2 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
From this angle easier to see the structure.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 2 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
An opposition pass that the Red Arrows would be proud of! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 2 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
The best of this morning’s attempt at photographing flying Swifts.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 2 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
It also is possible to photo flying House Martins!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 2 Jul 13
Trench Pool:
Hobby.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 2 Jul 13
Trench Pool:
 One of the Great Crested Grebes nest-building. Note how far back the legs are, making it hard for them to move around on land. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 2 Jul 13
Trench Pool:
 A bit of necking here.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 2 Jul 13
Middle Pool:
Legs (and crap) everywhere from these 7 Canada goslings. Just a hint of the white chinstrap as they begin to moult out of yellow down. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 2 Jul 13
Middle Pool:
 None of the 6 ducks in the foreground can be counted: as for the drake Mallard at the back ... we could debate its provenance.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 2 Jul 13
Middle Pool:
The Poplar Kitten on a lamp at Middle Pool: hard to separate from Sallow Kitten but generally larger. The strength and width of the dark band at the rear of the grey bar is the best clue.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 2 Jul 13
Trench Pool:
The Canada Goose in the middle looks rather small: but does not have the obvious small bill shown by the Cackling Goose-type at The Flash. The races of Canada Geese are a nightmare even in wild populations where location provided some clues. These feral birds: no chance. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 2 Jul 13
Trench Pool:
Isn’t love wonderful: these Great Crested Grebes think so (this is the other pair at Trench Lock).
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 2 Jul 13
Trench Pool:
Stupid haircuts! The Coot looks on, amazed.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 2 Jul 13
Trench Pool:
The Hobby appeared at high speed and there was no time to set the exposure and zoom it too far: just fire away and see what happened. The edited shot here shows the long narrow wings and the facial contrast.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 2 Jul 13
Trench Pool:
Shows the outline and I fancy I can just about make out the ‘red trousers’ though these are always hard to see when the bird is speeding past.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 3 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Nothing special about this: just a portrait of an adult Dunnock.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 3 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
A Buff Ermine moth on a lamp at The Flash.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 3 Jul 13
Priorslee Avenue tunnel:
Another variant of Common Marbled Carpet: this also on the roof of the Priorslee Avenue pedestrian tunnel.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 3 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
One of the new juvenile Great Crested Grebes declares UDI.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 3 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Had high hopes for this as the leaves were unspotted so what was it? Apparently just a Common Spotted Orchid (Dactylorhiza fuchsii) without spots!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 3 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Another I had hopes for but seems to be just a worn Timothy Tortrix (Aphelia paleana) which flush freely from the grass at the moment. It looks darker but seems that the scales are mostly worn off: you can see the hint of yellow around the shoulder.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 3 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Despite the cloudy weather there seemed to be a hatch of damselflies: the specimen in the middle seems to be a male Common Blue Damselfly – you can just see the blue developing at the ‘joins’ in the body segments. The blurred foreground individual is still to fully emerge.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 3 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
This shows a very freshly (partly?) emerged specimen and two exuviae. Probably the specimen has emerged from the adjacent exuvia. These were all on the frame of the sluice which yesterday held a second (at least) very large hatch of the Caddis-fly (Mystacides longicornis).
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 3 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A black beetle that seems closest to Spondylis buprestoides or Black Longicorn Beetle. But that has perhaps longer antenna and is mainly a conifer specialist. So ...?
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 3 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A ‘hairy’ snail!? No: just a very small snail. All young snails are apparently hairy!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 3 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A bit gory but this male Common Blue Damselfly has fallen foul of a web: but it enables the full detail of the venation on the wings to be appreciated (damselflies always rest with wings folded over their backs). The question arises: how on earth, and why, did evolution produce such complexity?
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 3 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
The Cormorant leaves the lake.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 3 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Real close up on this startling small fly: the interweb suggests it is a Lauxaniid, and possibly Sapromyza sp. not that I am any the wiser!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 3 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
This plant has been lurking in the shade for several weeks and shows little sign of opening it flowers further. It is clearly a Willowherb and obviously not the very familiar Rosebay Willowherb (Chamerion angustifolium). But which? I would vote for Hoary Willowherb (Epilobium parviflorum) even though it does not look especially “hoary”.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 3 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
This small insect sp. provides little clues to its ID in this view, but ...
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 3 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
As it takes off it looks ‘wasp-waisted’ and may be an ichneumon fly. Or not!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 3 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A black snail! research on the web has failed to provide any information on this rather unusual colour – the whorls on the shell are rather unusual as well.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 7 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Two vapour-trails greet the sunrise: the aircraft are inbound Europe from the USA. The trails indicate settled weather.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 7 Jul 13
Castle Farm Way:
A mangled Wood Pigeon carcass. The breast has been well-excavated which suggests Peregrine as responsible but the body was on the ground alongside Castle Farm Way and I would not expect a Peregrine (or anything else come to that) to devour prey there.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 7 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
More or less first wasp sp. of the year. A much maligned insect, very important in pest control. Often inquisitive but will only sting if provoked or nest is threatened.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 7 Jul 13
Priorslee Avenue:
Mistle Thrush on a lamp in Priorslee Avenue. The uneven spotting, more blotching, and rather small head help distinguish from small Song Thrush.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 7 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A Greenfinch: the flammulations on the breast suggest this is a juvenile. Note the neat V notch in the closed tail.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 7 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Daddy Greenfich is quite a handsome beast and the dark eye and large pale bill give a rather fierce demenour.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 7 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
These a challenge to photo: a party of Swallows were using some bare branches above the path around The Flash, the adults feeding these juveniles. From any other angle I was looking straight in to the sun! Juveniles have no tail-streamers and the throat-patch is rather browny-orange.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 7 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
3 Black-headed Gulls over The Flash: the uppermost bird shows a brown neck-collar and dark spotting on the wing coverts: this indicates a juvenile (a Lesser Black-backed Gull approaches from the opposite direction).
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 7 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
At the lake a party of Swallows was skimming the surface and dropping in to the water: whether they were feeding or bathing (they certainly weren’t drinking) I am unsure and this shot, the best of the bunch, doesn't help much!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 7 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Speckled Wood catches the sun!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 7 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A Long-tailed Tit after a wash and brush-up. The red eye is normal and does not indicate a debauched Saturday night!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 7 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
The only surviving juvenile from the latest brood of Great Crested Grebes rips a fish out of the parent’s bill (the father I think, but the plumage of both sexes is identical).
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 7 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
 A Garden Grass-veneer (Chrysoteuchia culmella). One of the common and confusing grass moths. The clue here is the gold fringe to the wing (though it is abraded to look more silver here): the angled cross-line too is almost worn away. I do find the eyes of these species rather strange-looking.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 8 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
The hazy start this morning: the growth of the weed is only too evident here.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 8 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Well: it is nearly in the middle! Must try harder. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 8 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
This attractive micro-moth is my first-ever record of Meadow Case-bearer (Coleophora mayrella). This species feeds on clover and amazingly occurs in the USA as well as much of Europe.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 8 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
This seems to be a Caddis-fly and not a moth: despite being a well-marked species does not appear in my literature! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 8 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Another pigeon ends as a meal: the plucked feathers and absence of carcass suggests Sparrowhawk – a species that has been unusually scarce of late around the lake, where it normally breeds.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 8 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
Pleasing portrait of a Greylag Goose: the strength of the neck-marking is very dependent on the angle of the light. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 8 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
From above a fresh Ringlet butterfly fails to show the ‘rings’ ... 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 8 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
... that are very evident from below!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 8 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
You thought you were troubled by pests! there are, thankfully, rather few larvae that gather like this. They look very like Small Tortoiseshell butterfly caterpillars that usually are found on nettle (Urtica sp.), though in truth it is rather hard to see exactly what is / was underneath.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 8 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
A country landscape alongside Woodhouse Lane. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 8 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
The thistles are just about opening: this is likely a Spear Thistle (Cirsium vulgare) and very painful to sit on! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 8 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
Compare with a Meadow Brown at rest. When flying the species are more easily confused but the slightly larger Meadow Brown has a more erratic flight, once learned is easily recognised. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 8 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A Coot still nest-building while one of its earlier brood sits-in! This will likely be a casualty of the weed clearance this week. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 8 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
This dragonfly refused to settle where I could see the body, but even hiding like this there is little problem identifying it as a Four-spotted Chaser. (Libellula quadrimaculata). The 2 spots on each wing (4 a side) and the dark at the base of the hind wing are both diagnostic. I have limited historic data of insects at the lake, but this appears to be my first at this site. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 9 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
The mist rolls in.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 9 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A Barred Yellow moth on one of the lamps.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 9 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
This is probably a boring grass moth: just as I pressed the shutter the moth took off showing the white underwing which makes them look so pale in flight. But it completely obscured the upper wing pattern essential to specific identification.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 9 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
The first Willow Beauty moth: note the feathered antenna of this specimen making it a male.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 9 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
One of the small Common Frogs (Rana temporaria).
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 9 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Soldier beetles preparing the next battalion while cavorting on ragwort.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 9 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Another one of those “don’t try this at home” photos: as the sun started to clear the mist and low cloud it was possible to make out the recent sun-spot activity with some dark blotches just above the 3 o’clock axis. You have to be VERY careful about ever looking directly at the sun.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 9 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
The older juvenile Great Crested Grebe is just about to lose its facial stripes and is starting to gain some of the cinnamon on the ear coverts.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 9 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
The Red Valerian (Centranthus ruber) on the dam is just past its prime.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 9 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
These blister galls are on Rosebay Willowherb leaves. Many insects and some fungi cause galls of this nature. I can find nothing specific to this plant on the web.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 9 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
‘Just like Mummy!’ the newest surviving juvenile Great Crested Grebe learns how to preen!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 9 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
But still looks revoltingly bug-eyed to me!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 9 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
The silver (in some lights, gold) wing tip on this grass moth identifies it as Garden Grass-veneer (Chrysoteuchia culmella).
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
The street-light competes with the flash to give a warm glow to this splendid Poplar Hawkmoth. No apologies for a repeat showing of this readily identifiable shape – the only large moth where the underwings are pushed forward to show from above.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Pre-dawn.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
The flight of 8 Cormorants approaches.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Now some colour in the sky.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
 A Harvestman on the lamps: probably Leiobunum sp. and perhaps Leiobunum rotundum.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A Light Emerald moth on one of the lamps: new for the year.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
 A Mottled Beauty moth: very similar to the Willow Beauty seen last week, best separated by the cross-lines staying separate whereas on Willow Beauty two of the lines come together to form a dark area close to the body. Also new for the year.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
This micro moth seems to be Celypha striana (Barred Marble): another one new for the year: even more interesting I now note is the Large Red Damselfly already in the web. This it turns out is my first confirmed sighting for this very common damselfly at the lake – but I have only been recording dragonflies etc. for c.2 years.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Rather unusual: a lone Feral Pigeon came to drink and is now about to depart. On this rather over-blown shot you can see a green ring on its left leg, so almost certainly a ‘lost’ racing pigeon.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Taken later here is an alternative view: a juicy fat body for some predator!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
 A Buff Ermine moth lurking in a lamp along Teece Drive.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
The first Riband Wave moth of the year. The ‘band’ is most often absent in specimens in this area, as it is here: just the lines at each side of where the band would be.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
This adult Black-headed Gull has started to moult: only the 6 or 7 outermost primaries remain with the inner primaries and outer secondaries having been dropped and replacements yet to be obvious.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
14 of the 39 Tufted Duck at The Flash.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
The Common Sandpiper on the island is dwarfed by the sleeping Mallard and especially the Canada Geese! The neat fringes on the feathers just discernable suggest this is a juvenile.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A juvenile Reed Bunting.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
This is a juvenile Common Whitethroat. At this age harder to separate Lesser and Common Whitethroats, but (not showing from this angle) this bird had extensive brown in the wings clinching its ID (it did not call, another easy way to separate them). Still just the merest trace of yellow in the gape.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
 Here you can see the brown wings.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Wing-moult progresses: on this immature Lesser Black-backed gull there are new adult-looking inner primaries and old and browner outer primaries with a few missing / re-growing.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
The clean yellow-green bill identifies this Mallard as a drake! It is in so-called eclipse plumage and you can see that it lacks primary feathers and therefore probably cannot fly at present.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
The adult Great Crested Grebe treats itself to breakfast: the juvenile will have to wait!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Another parent and juvenile study: the older brood.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 5 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
On this 1st year bird (the band on the tail identifies) there are 4 new inner primaries and 4 old outer primaries: 3 are missing or too short to show. Note that this bird acquired a full black-head even in its first summer: not all 1st year birds do.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Black-headed Gull
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Quite a surprise this: I thought I would take a shot of this moulting corvid and only when I had done so did I realise it was a Raven and not a Crow. Just look at that bill and head profile! My first at the lake this year!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Black-headed Gulls dispute who should stand on the buoy: Coots just dispute!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A pristine Comma butterfly: certainly from a new generation.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
 A Small Skipper: my first of the year. Separated only with difficulty from Essex Skipper: on that species the tips of the antenna are jet black. Easy to see on a photo – hard when its flying.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
 Meadow Brown at rest: note the dark circle on the underside of the forewing with a single white dot. Soon the slightly smaller Gatekeeper will be flying and this shows two white dots. But ...
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
This a male with the dark streak across the wing: these are “scent scales” apparently used to produce pheremones (I say ‘apparently’ as with many moths, at least, it is the male that responds to the pheremones given off by the female and they have more well-developed antennae to help them detect these pheremones.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
... they don’t always sit with the wings at the correct angle!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Even with the wings mostly closed this can be identified as a Small Tortoiseshell easily – by the blue dots in the training edge of the upper-wings.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Trench Middle Pool:
Yet another “parents with juveniles”: the new Great Crested Grebe brood at Middle Pool, Trench.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Trench Middle Pool:
This moth is either a Dark Dagger or, most likely, a Grey Dagger: these species are only separable by examination of the genitalia.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 15 Jul 13
Trench Lock Pool:
There is a small amount of dark on this Lesser Black-backed Gull’s bill but otherwise it looks just about a full adult. But look at the wear and bleaching in the wing!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
 A Small Rivulet moth under flash: it had gone later so not available in natural light. Hard to separate from Rivulet except on size. No points of reference here! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
 A promising start.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
But soon clouded at high level, and later at lower level as well for a while.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A Barred Fruit-tree Tortrix (Pandemis cerasana): annual here, presumably feeding on the cherry trees.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
This small moth is reminiscent of White-shouldered House Moth but that should not be 20’ up a lamp post!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
I retrieved this from 15’ up a lamp: seems that a spider has wrapped a Cinnabar moth. I know the caterpillars are distasteful and often thought poisonous because they eat Common Ragwort (which is supposed to kill horses – and humans if you were to eat 14lbs of it!). Whether spiders find the moths distasteful does not seem to be known!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
Not a very photogenic angle I am afraid: a Lesser Swallow Prominent moth up a lamp at The Flash. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
Here is a distant shot of 28 Tufted Duck at The Flash. 37 this morning in total.  
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Underside of a crane fly (Tipula sp.): a less-often seen view!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A few plants alongside the lake were infested with 100s of small flies. None elsewhere.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Snails really are well-marked and quite attractive if you look closely. No? oh all right! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
This Whitethroat looks almost threatening! The brown on the head means it is a female or juvenile (males are grey): the apparent dark iris suggests a juvenile.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
See it is quite possible, with strategy, to photograph hoverflies in flight. All you do is lie on the ground so they are against the sky; force the ‘flash’ on; and hey presto!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
 Remarkably similar silhouette! a rather scruffy immature Lesser Black-backed Gull about to get some new feathers (it hopes!)
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
All gulls moulting at the moment: this Herring Gull has adult-looking mantle and 3 inner primaries (the 4th is re-growing). But the strength of the band on the tail suggests it has another year to go before it really is a full adult.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Two Lesser Black-backs at about the same stage: note at this age they have pink legs.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Yesterday one would not open its wings: today the Small Tortoiseshell in all its glory!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Lurking deep in long grass and hard to get a clear shot: a Shaded Broad-bar moth. A day-flying species that can be easily disturbed but usually flies to hide in cover and can be hard to see well.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
 A quite splendid male Emperor Dragonfly: usually to be seen hawking endlessly. When you do find one at rest it is usually when you flush it! The overcast conditions kept activity lower this morning and I lucked upon one in the grass and managed to manoeuvre to get a clear shot without flushing it!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
The ‘business’ part.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Convolvulus flower here probably Great Bindweed (Calystegia silvatica). 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Elsewhere:
Cheating: this was taken elsewhere later today!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake
A hazy start.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake
And another opportunity to look at a sun-spot: here just below the 9 o’clock axis.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake
This micro moth seems to be a well-marked example of Little Grey (Dippleurina lacustrata).
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake
More on wing-moult: on this gull the inner primaries are new: the outer primaries are old: between are feathers dropped and re-growing: and it has also dropped some secondaries giving the wing a strange shape.
M(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake
One of the reasons there are so few moths on the lamps: too many spiders! Cannot immediately find this on the internet. Apart from what it is currently eating there seem to be many green-fly in the ‘web’.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake
The lack of neck-mark and the rather dull bill-colour suggest this is a juvenile Wood Pigeon but was rather surprised to see that it had dropped a primary feather in each wing as if it were in moult. I assumed that once fledged juveniles kept their wing-feathers until the annual moult the following summer.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake
Rather ‘beaky’ under those red-eyes! Possibly the fly Empis tessellata that predates other flies as well as taking nectar from umbellifers.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake
Cherries anyone? not sure that wild cherry produces edible fruit ... 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
Goldfinches are usually too busy to pose and allow photos to be taken! The shape of the red mask is supposed to differ slightly between males and females (most male finches have different plumage from females – sexual dimorphism). But in practice it seems impossible to sex a lone Goldfinch.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
For some reason I find separation between Small and Large White butterflies very hard. Males and females have different numbers of black spots which confuses. This, I think, is a female Large White, more from the size of the body than anything else.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
Here we are: my first Gatekeeper butterfly of the year. Smaller than Meadow Brown and two white dots in the black circle. But like the Meadow Brown .... 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
... can cover them up! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
Male Yellowhammer in full song! Sings later than almost all other birds – I reckon August 20th as last date for song. Against the sky and even with exposure compensation some feather detail is lost.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
A change of angle gives a rather ‘fussy’ background but the plumage is better seen.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
The usual close-up of ‘the works’! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
A Black-tailed Skimmer; often resting on bare ground before flying a short distance to catch prey seen with those amazing eyes.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
This Buzzard appears to have one longer primary! I assume it is loose and about to drop. It looks as if the next feather inboard is missing.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
This longhorn beetle is easy: it is Strangalia maculata, very common on umbellifers, as here.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
 “long horns” indeed.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Woodhouse Lane:
While this is a male whatever it is.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake
Determined to prove me a liar! Last winter I observed that large gulls on / attacking the buoys were almost always Herring Gulls. Well here is a Lesser Black-back sitting on one. In my defence all I can say is that there were no Herring Gulls around to claim their rights! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake
Interesting small red-eyed hoverfly feeding avidly in the Common Ragwort. My expert tells me it is a female Sphaerophoria sp. (Female Sphaerophoria can't be identified in most cases).
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake
Rather ‘blown-out’ by the strong sun (not complaining: just observing!) this is a Pale Straw Pearl (Udea lutealis) moth. Easily flushed during the day, but hard to get a good look at.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake
Help: he’s taking dung pictures now! Well this was on the hand-rail of the Wesley Brook footbridge. Is it an otter spraint? Much too dried out and (rock) hard to take a smell, but ... what else? Sadly I think Mink is more likely due to the twist in the spraint? 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake
The photo reveals rather more red-colour around the base of the wings but without the all-black legs shown by Ruddy Darter this has to be a Common Darter as I first thought. Neither species is shown as ‘common’ in Shropshire.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 17 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake
This is a Large Skipper (29 – 36 mm wingspan). Scarcely larger than Small Skipper (27 – 34 mm wingspan)! Small Skipper has plain wings (apart from the single diagonal scent gland on the male): Large Skipper has well-marked wings (other skippers mainly have brown or grey wings).
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Another hazy start.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Not great light (it was 05:00) but a record shot of 2 (of the 5 / 6) Common Terns leaving.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Strange cloud-effect makes it look as if the rising sun is tilted on its axis: since it is circular this cannot be so! Passing gull accidentally silhouetted!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A fine Mottled Beauty moth.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A very fuzzy moth (the photo is fine!): it is a Yellow-tail. They often rest with the tail curved up and sticking up between the wings which makes separation from the very similar Brown-tail easy! But here the dark spot on the back, present only in the male, confirms the ID
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
This seems to be a Chequered Fruit-tree Tortrix (Pandemis corylana). Tortrix moths can be confusing!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Been trying to count the legs! Is this a female spider eating her mate? (many species do!). Or with a prey-item? I think the latter as it seems to have eyes like a fly rather than the row of eyes that most spiders show.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
What a beauty! Well a Marbled Beauty moth actually. Well-named.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
This close-up of the hybrid goose at The Flash shows how pale the legs are: much paler than any species of wild goose as far as I can see. Some Canada Goose genes are obvious; the bill looks Greylag. But the rest?
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Good views like this make separation of eclipse drake Mallard (on the left with the almost plain greeny bill) from the duck (which always has a dark bill shading to orange at the edges) straightforward. Not always this close!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
You can just about make out the ‘zip’ up the front!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A Nuthatch peering in the knot-hole for food. Rather ‘dull’ markings on the head: not sure whether this is an adult ‘worn out’ after the breeding season or a juvenile yet to acquire smart new plumage.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
This adult Black-headed Gull is starting to lose the chocolate ‘hood’ quite quickly. Here you can see a gap in the folded wing feathers as these moult.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Reed Warblers have been very hard to get good views of this year: and this isn’t one of them! Probably because there are rather few birds here this year – only 3 singing males stayed: usually 6 – 9 pairs breed.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
About time we renewed these feathers: they do look rather worn!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
One of the so-called Soldier Beetles and colloquially ‘bloodsucker’ (from its colour), this very common and harmless insect is Ragonycha fulva.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
And the underside of the same species sharing a Ragwort with a Cinnabar caterpillar.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
The working end of the Cinnabar caterpillar: seems to be contemplating the petal whereas I thought they are the foliage.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A new flower today: this is (Amphibious) Bistort / Water Knotweed etc. (Persicaria amphibia). It will soon be abundant all along the south side of the lake (unless it gets mown down!).
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Its such a strain standing up in this hot weather!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Today’s juvenile Common Whitethroat: he is clearly a teenager going through his ‘punk’ phase! (actually he is much younger than that with quite extensive yellow on the gape still).
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A flying barn-door! This Grey Heron thought better of landing in the Wesley Brook when it noticed me standing on the bridge.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Herons normally fly with their neck tucked back but only after they have ‘got it all together’: this one was still recovering from the shock of seeing me.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 18 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
I photographed the upper wings of a Comma butterfly earlier this week. Ever wondered how it got its name? Wonder no more.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
This moth is probably Common Grey (Scoparia ambigualis) but there are several possible confusion species. Measurement and examination of genitalia is the only reliable way for full determination!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
One of the myriad of what were probably Mystacides longicornis caddis flies: this one avoided the webs, so far (no idea about the small fly!)
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
This is one of the more distinctive of the grass moths both in ground colour and markings: a Hook-marked Straw Moth (Agapeta hamana) on the lamps.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Avenue tunnel:
This female Ghost Moth was found resting on the roof of the Priorslee Avenue foot tunnel.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Not exactly the world’s best photo of a flying tern, but in the dull conditions and at extreme range it still shows the diagnostic dark marks on the underside of the primaries. An Arctic Tern would also show a really red bill rather than the orangey bill here.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 21 Jun 13
Priorslee Lake:
Scarcely better when at rest, but this emphasises the bill colour (and an Artcic Tern would appear almost leg-less due to its very short legs).
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 22 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
This micro moth appears to be a Grey Tortrix (Cnephasia stephensiana): I think it looks more brown than ‘grey’ because of the colour temperature of the flash. But genitalia examination would be required to confirm!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 22 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
 I cannot dictate where the moths choose to rest: jammed in the edge of the light here is a Common Footman moth
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 22 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:

(Ed Wilson)Photo: 22 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
The progress of the Swan family at the lake: all growing well and feeding for themselves.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 22 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
The extent of the Canadian Pond Weed problem is evident here! Unchecked it will choke the whole lake.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 22 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
And here!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 22 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
Here is another juvenile Black-headed Gull, somewhat longer out of the nest and with more 1st winter feathers. By the end of August most of the juvenile feathers will have been replaced.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 22 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
and the other side! It was a very confiding bird. It could be that this was more or less its first encounter with humans and had not learned to be afraid!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 22 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
Like a duck to water!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 22 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
Here is another juvenile Black-headed Gull, somewhat longer out of the nest and with more 1st winter feathers. By the end of August most of the juvenile feathers will have been replaced.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Interesting sky to start.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Note how much Canadian Pond weed has been removed – but how much remains!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
This is a shield bug: the combination of the green colour and the ‘power shoulders’ seems to rule out most of the common shield bug sps. and I am at a loss to ID it!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
The male Great Crested Grebe brings food.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
Seems to give it to the female who feeds one juvenile, just about visible on her back.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
Father then admires his off-spring!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jul 13
Priorslee Avenue tunnel:
A quite splendid Swallow-tailed Moth on the roof of the foot tunnel under Priorslee Avenue.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Hopefully work in progress: the cut Canadian Pond Weed here piled up on the surface and a platform for the Moorhen to run around on.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
being a dull morning some of the ‘brown’ butterflies were resting with wings open to get additional warmth: here a Gatekeeper. The mark across the forewing are scent scales and identify it as a male.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
This is a ‘plan view’ of a Silver Y moth. This is a migrant moth that reaches the UK in good numbers most years.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
More of a side elevation here reveals the characteristically ‘lumpy’ shape. The name comes, of course, from the inverted rather stylised silver ‘Y’.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Ringlet butterflies have been flying for some weeks now and some are looking rather the worse for wear!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A fine Episyrphus balteatus hoverfly on a hawkweed flower.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
This is another shot of a small Sphaerophoria sp hoverfly which has the same yellow / black “warning” marking. The gap between the eyes shows it is a female and specific identification is not possible without DNA analysis.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Some flies just look evil! I’ve done this one before – Sarcophaga carnia or Flesh Fly – but is worth repeating.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
A much better shot of a Pale Straw Pearl moth (Udea lutealis) than I took earlier when the delicate marks were rather blown out.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
This is a great-looking micro moth though with a name like Red Piercer (Lathronympha strigana) perhaps the St John’s Wort (its food plant) would not agree! New for me.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 24 Jul 13
Trench Lock Pool:
I’m inclined to think this is a very recently emerged female Emerald Damselfly (Lestes sponsa) but has yet to get its full adult colouration.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake
This small moth is well-marked but does not seem to have any clear pattern! It is probably a Hoary Bell (Eucosma cana). Not new for me at the lake.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
My: what big feet you have! Two juvenile Moorhens and a parent clamber over the ‘bund’ of cut Canadian Pondweed alongside the N shore of the lake.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
The long dagger-like bill on this warbler help identify this Reed Warbler clambering through the vegetation. The whiteness of the throat is partly from the angle of view combined with the bird’s posture.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Yes well: it had to be cut but did anyone expect it to be left there?
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Or indeed piled up there ...
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Or there?
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash
Possible Roach and a large one at that!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 25 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
Juvenile and spotty Robin in squirrel alley at The Flash. Don’t really like ‘flashing’ birds but in this dark location there was no alternative. But in fact most birds don’t seem to care at all.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
It’s that time of the month again: here is July’s waning moon over the lake.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Dawn’s early light.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Birds are very adaptable: the Coots have already found that the floating weed is a safe roost (while mist rises over the water). 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Not a bad sunrise.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
After the poor effort three days ago: this is what a Common Footman moth should look like!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
This micro moth is probably a Common Cloaked Shoot (Gypsonoma dealbana).
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
The furry head helps identify this as moth with the name ‘The Clay’.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
For us this is the more unusual form of the Riband Wave moth in which the area between the two cross-lines is filled to form a ‘solid’ band. This form becomes more common the further south you travel in England.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
This is another micro moth (some are larger than some so-called macro moths): it is a Dusky Pearl (Udea prunalis).
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Is this a spider tucking in to a wasp? or is the wasp biting the spider after perhaps having stung it to subdue it? It is a vicious world out there! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Mum Mallard and her 8 ducklings at the lake. They don’t seem to have grown much in the last 5 days: could be another brood, co-incidentally of 8? 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
I know I have done a Small Tortoiseshell before but when they pose like this it is hard to resist.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
‘just’ a Large White but on this fresh specimen look how dusted with yellow it is. Often possible to find Green-veined White or female Orange-tips by how white, as opposed to cream, they look in flight.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Small Copper
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
My last new ‘common’ butterfly for this year: a Small Copper. Some new species are possible but unlikely around the lake (I missed Brimstone in the Spring).
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
With some persistence managed better Reed Warbler photos this morning: an adult with food.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
... and without food! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
Looking for daddy Great Crested Grebe?
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake:
New feathers please.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
A rather strange shaped spider.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
Was pleased with this flying Black-headed Gull: nothing special about it.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Flash:
... and on the down stroke highlighting the white leading edge of the outer part of the wing.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Jul 13
Priorslee Avenue tunnel:
This moth is called The Herald and it is easy to see why. Also found in the tunnel under Priorslee Avenue. My first for several years though it is quite a common moth.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 4 Aug 13
Trench Lock Pool:
A family of 4 Common Terns
(Dave Tromans)Photo: 11 Aug 13
Trench Lock Pool:
A Common Tern
(Martin Grant)Photo: 11 Aug 13
Trench Lock Pool:
A Common Tern
(Martin Grant)Photo: 12 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
Very little colour in the sunrise this morning.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 12 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
but an interesting sky for a while.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 12 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
Harvestman sp. on the lamps.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 12 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
Autumn approaches ....: a group of fungus: species? 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 12 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
Extensive areas of weed are still present on the lake.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 12 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
A fine Episyrphus balteatus (or Marmalade) hoverfly.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 12 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
Here is another deep in a Convolvulus sp. flower.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 12 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
Another fine hoverfly: this is Eristalis pertinax which, though common, seems to have previously eluded me at this site.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 12 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
And another hoverfly: this is Helophilus pendulus.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 12 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
Although the legs looked rather pale detailed examination of this photos suggests ‘just’ a female Blue-tailed Damselfly rather than the hoped-for White-legged Damselfly.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 12 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
This cluster of pink flowers belongs to Water Mint (Mentha aquatica).
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 12 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
A juvenile Blackbird lifts a wing about to fly away. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 12 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
The Rose-bay Willowherb flowers are mostly over and the seed pods are starting to acquire the downy-look that precedes the masses of feathery seeds emerging when the pods dry and split.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 12 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
A fine Meadow Brown butterfly. The wings are spread here as the sun was rather weak: in full sun this species usually rests with its wings closed.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 12 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
A female Common Darter at rest: the lines along the side indicate a mature specimen.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 12 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
A  rather worn example of a Udea lutealis (Pale Straw Pearl) here feeding on the nectar of Knapweed (Centaurea sp.). Many species of moth do not feed in the imago phase. Note also the two very small beetles crawling in between the petals.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 12 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
Convolvulus flowers attract insects other than hoverflies. This appears to be a rather scruffy and worn Bombus pascuorum with liberal amount of pollen all over the fur (from this angle it is not possible to see whether there is a pollen basket and so it could be a Cuckoo Bee sp.)
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 12 Aug 13
Priorslee Flash:
A real mix over the wooded area S of The Flash: 2nd down with the big diamond tail is a Raven; below it is one of the local Crows showing extensive white areas in the wings (this feature is almost never seen in Rooks, Jackdaws or Ravens); at the bottom a Buzzard.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 13 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
 “red sky in the morning” 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 13 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
and again
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 13 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
Cluster of fungus sp. on the football field.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 13 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
This appears to be a puff-ball sp. though it looks as much like a Field Mushroom without a stalk as any puff-ball sp.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 13 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
Two of the juvenile Herons have a small dispute.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 13 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
Berries are beginning to appear: another herald of Autumn. This seems to be a Viburnum sp. and I suspect a planted shrub rather than wild.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 13 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
This shield-bug sp. is certainly well-camouflaged. Not sure about the black feet though.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 13 Aug 13
Priorslee Flash:
 Large-flowered Evening-primrose (Oenothera glazioviana) at The Flash: probably a garden escape [you live and learn: I had always called this California Poppy until I checked before ‘publishing’ this!] 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 13 Aug 13
Priorslee Flash:
This bumble bee sp. was almost moribund: perhaps the cold clear night; perhaps just the end for this specimen.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 13 Aug 13
Priorslee Flash:
A fine duck Tufted Duck.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 13 Aug 13
Priorslee Flash:
Moorhens get very secretive when breeding: I take it they have finished!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 13 Aug 13
Priorslee Avenue tunnel:
This Red Underwing moth was on the roof of the Priorslee Avenue foot-tunnel. I see one here most years.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 13 Aug 13
Trench Lock Pool:
Common Tern at Trench Lock Pool.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 13 Aug 13
Trench Lock Pool:
Everything spread in the hover.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 13 Aug 13
Trench Lock Pool:
Watch out fish! note the darker ‘wedge’ in the primaries which would not be shown by an Arctic Tern.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 13 Aug 13
Trench Lock Pool:
Family of 5 small Great Crested Grebes clamber aboard at Trench Lock. I only noted four, but this photo revealed the true number.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 13 Aug 13
Trench Lock Pool:
Dad with food.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 13 Aug 13
Middle Pool:
Lesser Swallow Prominent moth on lamp near Trench Middle Pool.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 13 Aug 13
Middle Pool:
Amazingly another specimen on the same lamp! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 14 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake
The sunrise ‘the other way around’ was more interesting with some mist evident on a morning with a distinct Autumn feel 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 14 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake
2 of the three Ravens over the lake.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 14 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
This wasp (Vesper sp.) seems to be examining an insect / larval case of some sort – food?
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 14 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
Two days ago a female Common Darter: here is the red-bodied adult male.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 14 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
From directly behind look at the proportion of those eyes.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 14 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
Yes: these eyes!
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 14 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake:
While this one seems to be doing press-ups! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 14 Aug 13
Wood Lane:
At first glance this Peacock butterfly looks very smart: but just look at the ragged trailing edge of the wings. Seen better days / been in a fight? 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 14 Aug 13
Wood Lane:
This is what they should look like! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 14 Aug 13
Wood Lane:
This is a Mother of Pearl moth though either through wear or because of the rather strange angle I was forced to shoot from it shows no pearl lustre.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 14 Aug 13
Wood Lane:
This Large White moth shows two oval-shaped brown marks on the wing: something I have never noticed before and cannot find any reference to in any literature.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 14 Aug 13
Wood Lane:
A still-fluffy juvenile Grey Wagtail.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 14 Aug 13
Wood Lane:
Sideways-on the long tail, continually pumped, was too fast for the camera to freeze in the available light. It is doing the foot-stomp too! But this shows the yellow on the rump and undertail. Wagtails are named after the back colour, hence this is a Grey Wagtail and not a Yellow Wagtail.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 14 Aug 13
Wood Lane:
Three for the price of one: Peacock and rather scruffy Large White on Ragwort.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 14 Aug 13
Wood Lane:
Another unidentified bumble bee sp.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 9 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake
Five-spot Burnet moths
(Jason Garton)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake
Common Blue Damselflies
(Jason Garton)Photo: 16 Jul 13
Priorslee Lake
Longhorn Beetle - Rutpela maculata
(Jason Garton)Photo: 22 Aug 13
Priorslee Flash
Grey Heron and Terrapin
(Phil Nock)Photo: 22 Aug 13
Priorslee Flash
Grey Heron and Terrapin
(Phil Nock)Photo: 22 Aug 13
Priorslee Flash
Grey Heron and Terrapin
(Phil Nock)Photo: 22 Aug 13
Priorslee Flash
Grey Heron and Terrapin
(Phil Nock)Photo: 22 Aug 13
Priorslee Flash
Grey Heron and Terrapin
(Phil Nock)Photo: 22 Aug 13
Priorslee Flash
Grey Heron
(Phil Nock)Photo: 22 Aug 13
Priorslee Flash
Coot
(Phil Nock)Photo: Canada Goose (Phil Nock)Photo: 22 Aug 13
Priorslee Flash
Canada Goose and juvenile Great Crested Grebe (Phil Nock)Photo: 22 Aug 13
Priorslee Flash
Canada Goose
(Phil Nock)Photo: 22 Aug 13
Priorslee Flash
Black-headed Gull
(Phil Nock)Photo: 22 Aug 13
Priorslee Flash
Black-headed Gull
(Phil Nock)Photo: 22 Aug 13
Priorslee Flash
Black-headed Gull
(Phil Nock)Photo: 22 Aug 13
Priorslee Flash
Black-headed Gull
(Phil Nock)Photo: 22 Aug 13
Priorslee Flash
Black-headed Gull
(Phil Nock)Photo: 26 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake
A nice clear moon above ... 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake
A misty start.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake
The sun soon cutting through .
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake
A sign of Autumn: a new species of fungus on the football field.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake
And another sign: the spiders busy with their webs. 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake
Could almost use this as a maze.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake
This motley collection of 17 Black-headed Gulls includes no fewer than 15 immatures, 14 of which seem to be moulting from their ‘ginger’ juveniles garb in to first-winter plumage. So where were all the adults?
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake
A juvenile Lesser Black-backed Gull on the weed. the very dark greater coverts help separate this from a juvenile Herring Gull that would also show a somewhat less dark on the face.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake
And much less ‘patterned’ underwing.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake
Part of a family of Moorhens with 4 juveniles ... 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake
With three of them being gently herded away from me.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake
The camera reveals 3 of these 4 Cormorants are immatures with white / pale areas on the body. Not quite sure what gives the wings of some of them the white patches: a trick of the light?
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake
How the might have fallen – well are falling anyway. A once proud Giant Hogweed plant collapsing under the weight of its own ripe seeds in the umbels.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Aug 13
Woodhouse Lane
The fruits of Autumn: but don’t look for the ripe Blackberries as they were in my stomach with a minute of the photo! 
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Aug 13
Priorslee Lake
But these Sloes, the fruits of Blackthorn, will certainly not find their way into my stomach: an acquired taste even in Mother’s Ruin – Gin.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Aug 13
Woodhouse Lane
All will soon be gathered in ... a view from Woodhouse Lane.
(Ed Wilson)Photo: 26 Aug 13
Woodhouse Lane
White Dead-Nettle is common in the lane.
(Ed Wilson)