52 Photos - Nov 11, 2011
Photo: Cape buffalo at Motswedi waterholePhoto: Crimson-breasted Shrike (Afrikaans: Rooiborslaksman) nesting at the Haak en Steek rest camp in the Mokala National Park of South AfricaPhoto: Cape Wagtail (Motacilla capensis) (Afrikaans: Gewone Kwikkie)Photo: The seed pods of the Camel Thorn tree. The park name, Mokala, is the Tswana name for this tree, Acacia erioloba. The tree grow up to 17m high and the seed pods are up to 10 cm in length. The seeds are very hard and brown and will only germinate after  being soaked in hot water for some time. Apparently the seed can be roasted as substitute for coffee beans.Photo: Acacia tortilis or  Umbrella Thorn Acacia tree. The Afrikaans name of Haak en Steek means hook and stab, As can be seen on the photo,  there are often hooked thorns that can hook you, as well as long spines that can stab you. This photo was taken at the Haak en Steek rest camp.Photo: Crimson-breasted Shrike (Afrikaans: Rooiborslaksman) perching in a Haak en Steek tree ("Hook" and "Stab" tree - look at the thorns)Photo: Crimson-breasted Shrike (Afrikaans: Rooiborslaksman) perching in a Haak en Steek tree ("Hook" and "Stab" tree - look at the thorns)Photo: Crimson-breasted Shrike (Afrikaans: Rooiborslaksman)Photo: Southern Yellow-billed Hornbill (Afrikaans: Geelbekneushoringvoêl)Photo: Mud throwing. A Tsesebe at the Haak en Steek waterhole.Photo: Mud bath. A Tsesebe at the Haak en Steek waterhole.Photo: Tsesebe after a mud bath.Photo: Finished with my mud bath. Now for my beauty sleep! A Tsesebe in the Mokala National Park.Photo: White rhino at Mokala National Park. They obviously had a mud bath!Photo: Leopard Tortoise (Afrikaans: Bergskilpad) at the waterhole at Haak en Steek camp site, Mokala National Park.Photo: A red sun sets on a young Kudu bull and a Kudu cow at the Motswedi Camp Site in the Mokala National ParkPhoto: Sunset at Motswedi Camp Site in the Mokala National ParkPhoto: Giraffe carcass, Mokala National Park. We saw only two Giraffe the whole weekend - this was one of them. It apparently died of old age.Photo: African Red-eyed Bulbul (Afrikaans: Rooioogtiptol) at the bird hide at Stofdam in the Mokala National Park.Photo: Top: Green-winged Pytilla (Afrikaans: Gewone Melba), bottom: Black-faced Waxbill (Afrikaans: Swartwangsysie) at the bird hide at Stofdam in the Mokala National ParkPhoto: Southern Masked Weaver (Afrikaans: Swartkeelgeelvink) at the bird hide at Stofdam in the Mokala National ParkPhoto: A Barn Swallow (Afrikaans: Europese Swael) scoops water at the bird hide at Stofdam in the Mokala National Park.Photo: Greater Striped Swallow (Afrikaans: Grootstreepswael) scoops water at the bird hide at Stofdam in the Mokala National Park.Photo: Greater Striped Swallow (Afrikaans: Grootstreepswael) at the bird hide at Stofdam in the Mokala National Park.Photo: Greater Striped Swallow (Afrikaans: Grootstreepswael) at the bird hide at Stofdam in the Mokala National Park.Photo: A friend with his D700 and 600mm f4 at Haak en Steek Rest Camp in the Mokala National Park. Note the buffalo warning in front of his knees.Photo: What are you looking at? Warthog in the Mokala National Park.Photo: Warthog mom with kids in the Mokala National ParkPhoto: A Warthog at the Haak en Steek waterhole in the Mokala National Park.Photo: "En garde" Two Red Hartebeest ready to engage in a mock fight.Photo: Two Red Hartebeest in a sparring contest in the Mokala National Park.Photo: African Hoopoe (Afrikaans: Hoephoep) at the Motswedi Camp Site in the Mokala National ParkPhoto: What happened to my head? A Kudu cow in the Mokala National ParkPhoto: Zebras at the Haak en Steek waterhole in the Mokala National ParkPhoto: Zebra in the Mokala National ParkPhoto: An Oryx (Afrikaans: Gemsbok) in the Mokala National ParkPhoto: Bull's eye! A Waterbuck (Afrikaans: Waterbok) in the Mokala National Park. This species is not endemic to this region and was introduced when this area was a game farm. It is planned to relocate them to another park.Photo: A Nyala at at the bird hide at Stofdam in the Mokala National Park. This species is not endemic to this region and was introduced when this area was a game farm. It is planned to relocate them to another park.Photo: Camping at Motswedi Camp Site in the Mokala National Park.Photo: Camping at Motswedi Camp Site in the Mokala National Park. A 4x4 caravan, unfortunately not mine!Photo: I'm itching... Buffalo, Mokala National park, South AfricaPhoto: Sunset, Mokala National Park, South AfricaPhoto: Sunset, Mokala National Park, South AfricaPhoto: A Cape Wagtail (Afrikaans: Gewone Kwikkie) directly after it's first flight. Motswedi Camp Site, Mokala National Park, South Africa.Photo: Young kudus at the Motswedi Camp Site, Mokala National Park, South Africa.Photo: A female Cape Wagtail (Afrikaans: Gewone Kwikkie) and her chicks nesting on top of a 100mm square mild steel tube used as part of the kitchen/bathroom building at our campsite at Motswedi, Mokala National Park, South Africa.Photo: On our way home from Mokala National Park - Lesser  Flamingos in the salt pans at the small town of Dealesville.Photo: On our way home from Mokala National Park - a lonely Grey-headed Gull (Afrikaans: Gryskopmeu) above the salt pans at the small town of Dealesville.Photo: And a final goodbye to the weekend at the Mokala National Park from a flaming sunset.Photo: A male ostrich drinking water at the Haak en Steek waterhole in the Mokala National Park in South AfricaPhoto: Photo: