35 Photos - Jun 7, 2014
Photo: These keys will _not_ come off "accidentally." Not only are they sunken in to the keyboard, note the little tabs on the upper right and bottom left of each keycap which apparently lock each cap in place. I believe the _only_ way to pop these keys off is to purposefully break the tabs.Photo: These keys will _not_ come off "accidentally." Not only are they sunken in to the keyboard, note the little tabs on the upper right and bottom left of each keycap which apparently lock each cap in place. I believe the _only_ way to pop these keys off is to purposefully break the tabs.Photo: Keyboards: Thinkpad 11e on top, x131e on bottom.

I don't have a postal scale, but the keyboard assembly for the 11e feels almost twice as heavy as that on the x131e, even though the later has the Trackpoint with buttons. The entire keyboard is significantly stiffer, with a thicker metal frame all around the sides.Photo: Keyboards (bottom view): Thinkpad 11e on top, x131e (with Trackpoint) on bottom.

Both keyboards have a metal place, but the 11e is definitely thicker. It feels almost twice as heavy as the keyboard assembly for the x131e, and it is significantly stiffer. No keyboard flex on the 11e!Photo: Underneath the keyboard is a thin aluminum (my guess) plate protecting the mainboard.Photo: This is the bottom view of the keyboard bezel, with the SD card reader at lower right and the bottom of the trackpad in the lower middle. Note the metal plates beneath the trackpad.Photo: Close-up of the metal plate that the trackpad is attached to and the separate metal strip that supports the trackpad buttons.

These aren't just thin metal sheets; they are solid, rigid plates. You can see the thickness of the metal where it is bent up at the sides of the trackpad.Photo: What the bottom of the device looks like with the battery removed. Removal involves just four screws and a (tight) connector. While not an external battery pack, defective or failed batteries will still be *easily replaceable*, which is *good* news for the longevity of the device.Photo: View of the top of the mainboard with the keyboard bezel removed. Note that the copper colored material is *plastic*, not actual metal.Photo: Close-up of the "dustless" CPU fan, which vents to the rear of the device. A copper heatpipe attaches to the Celeron N2930 CPU itself, located on the opposite side of the metal bracket on the right.Photo: The other four memory SKhynix chips making up the 4GB of memory, hard soldered to the mainboard.Photo: Mainboard removed. This is the side directly beneath the keyboard.Photo: Bottom side of the mainboard, showing the heatpipe and heat sink for the CPU and the other four memory chips. A black film covered the other components.Photo: One thing that baffled me was where the SSD was. I finally located it hiding under the black film.

Unfortunately, like the memory, it is hard soldered to the mainboard. 

*Sandisk SDIN8DE4 - 16G chip* which is a MLC chip according to this source: http://www.techinsights.com/reports-and-subscriptions/open-market-reports/Report-Profile/?ReportKey=9833

Going price: $17.61 each at last check. ;)Photo: The next series of images shows the LCD hinges for the device. I wanted to focus on these since the hinges were a point of failure for the previous generation x131e.

View of the left hinge, with the power connector just beside it. Note the grey metal bracket that holds the power connector down; extra reinforcement for when kids jam the power adapter in.Photo: Right side hinge; the dark black piece that is the fulcrum for the hinge is actually *hard steel*, _not_ plastic!Photo: Close-up of how the LCD panel assembly attaches to the base of the device. The attachment is *metal to metal* with two screws driven down and one screw coming up holding the two metal to each other.Photo: View of the left metal attachment bracket on the base for the LCD assembly. I count ~6 rivets~ holding the metal bracket to the bottom base. This looks to be ~significantly~ stronger than the attachment for the x131e, with many more contact points between bracket and base to spread the force from opening and closing the LCD lid.

I don't think we would have to do this repair much on the 11e:  https://plus.google.com/113153290506656312204/posts/9xoSRw8ftqKPhoto: View of the right metal attachment bracket on the base for the LCD assembly with 4 rivets holding the metal bracket to the bottom base and no less than ~5~ screws holding this to the metal mount of the LCD assembly.

That's a total of *9 attachment points* (screws or rivets) distributed evenly in a spread out area holding ~each~ hinge tight against the base.

I don't think we would have to do this repair much on the 11e:  https://plus.google.com/113153290506656312204/posts/9xoSRw8ftqKPhoto: Complete LCD assembly, minus the plastic bezel. For those of you who are considering doing in house LCD panel swaps, that plastic bezel was ~very~ difficult to get off without damage. A good pry tool will certainly be required.Photo: Close-up of the left metal hinge. Yes, that dark black, rounded hinge is ~all metal~. As far as I can tell, *every single part* that makes up the hinge of this device is ~entirely metal~, up to the point where the hinge attaches to the plastic body of the device.Photo: Close-up of the right hinge. If you didn't see my picture and caption for the left hinge, let me state again that the dark black, rounded hinge is ~all metal~. As far as I can tell, *every single part* that makes up the hinge of this device is ~entirely metal~, up to the point where the hinge attaches to the plastic body of the device.Photo: The metal attachment bracket for the hinge extends up as a metal bar along both sides of the LCD panel, thus providing rigidity and support when opening and closing the LCD.Photo: Tag for the LCD panel itself.
INNOLUX N116BGE -EA2
Brightness is 220 cd/m^2 (source: http://www.panelook.com/N116BGE-EA2_Innolux_11.6_LCM_overview_21066.html)Photo: This is the inside of the top LCD lid.
Dual wifi antennas extend up to just above the copper film at the top of the LCD.Photo: Most of the screws and brackets that I removed during the course of the teardown. Not shown, the 6 screws holding the bottom panel and the 4 screws holding the battery.

This model is a little harder to disassemble than the x131e.Photo: Main components laid out.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Bottom of trackpad and the SD card reader under different lighting. Again, note the solid steel plates underneath the trackpad and buttons.Photo: Photo: Photo: WebcamPhoto: The stereo speakers, which are attached to the top of the keyboard bezel, thus piping sound out from the top of the keyboard.