20 Photos - Jun 27, 2008
Photo: Nanopore chips after RIE processPhoto: Happy Halloween Day!!!Photo: The biologically inspired silica nanotubes (SiNTs) are fabricated by utilizing bacterial flagella as bio-templates. Due to the polymorphic transformation property of flagella, the SiNTs have unique circle shapes. The image was taken on a SEM (Zeiss Supra 50VP) operated at 2 kV by Wonjin Jo.Photo: The image shows the metalized silica nanotubes (SiNTs) by gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The decoration of AuNPs renders electrical conductivity into densely packed 3D dielectric SiNTs network structures. It was taken on a SEM (Zeiss Supra 50VP) at 2 kV by Wonjin Jo.Photo: The biologically inspired silica nanotubes (SiNTs) were significantly improved by coating metal nanoparticles (NPs) inclduing gold, palladium, and iron oxide. The metalized SiNTs have the potential to be developed as electronic materials for future nanoelectronics. The images were taken on a JEOL JEM 2100 operated at 200 kV by Wonjin Jo and Kevin Freedman.Photo: 5 nm diameter solid-state nanopore drilled by transmission electron microscope (TEM)Photo: 2 nm diameter solid-state nanopore drilled by transmission electron microscope (TEM)Photo: Gold nanorodsPhoto: Nanowire arrays for photovoltaicsPhoto: Synthesized nano particles for one step DNA extractionPhoto: Nanoscale architectures within a nanochannel for LDL apheresisPhoto: Thin film assisted by siliconPhoto: This image depicts a ~200 nm nanopore drilled in a free standing membrane (100 nm Au +20 nm Ti+250 nm Si3n4) drilled with a focused ion beam using 30 kV accelerating voltage and 30 pA aperture with the gold side facing the beam. The pore was subsequently closed from the silicon nitride side by shrinking under the electron beam of an SEM accelerated at 1 kV. For this figure, the pore is imaged from the gold side. Because of differences in sputtering rates during FIB milling, more gold is sputtered than silicon nitride resulting in some nitride being exposed around the circumference of the pore. The image has been colorized to reveal the different layers. The inside walls of the shrunk pore are slightly visible. The image was taken at 82.5 kX and 2 kV by Anmiv Prabhu.Photo: Shown here is film of copper ions deposited onto a silicon nitride chip. The chip comprised of a 50 nm thick free standing silicon nitride membrane, seen broken in the center of the image, supported within a silicon structure, seen as the side walls in this image.  The membrane had a nanopore drilled in it and was used to perform single channel patch clamp experiments. However under the effect of a relatively high voltage, it is presumed that copper ions from the electrodes got deposited on to chip. The image was taken at 253X at 1 kV by Anmiv Prabhu.Photo: Two gold nanoparticles with an average diameter of 10 nm were prepared by adding a drop of the gold solution onto a holey carbon film and allowed to evaporate.  The crystal structure of the gold is easily observed in each nanoparticle.  Bright filed images were taken on a JEM 2100 operated at 200kV by Kevin Freedman & Rosemary Bastian.Photo: An oval-shaped cluster of gold nanoparticles with an average diameter of 25 nm prepared by adding a drop of the gold solution onto a holey carbon film and allowed to evaporate.  Bright filed images were taken on a JEM 2100 operated at 200kV by Kevin Freedman & Rosemary Bastian.Photo: Gold nanoparticles and nanorods prepared by adding a drop of the gold solution onto a holey carbon film and allowed to evaporate.  Bright filed images were taken on a JEM 2100 operated at 200kV (scale bar=200 nm) by Kevin Freedman and Wonjin Jo.Photo: A circular aggregation of gold nanoparticles with an average diameter of 10 nm.  The sample was prepared by adding a drop of the gold solution onto a holey carbon film and allowed to evaporate.  Bright filed images were taken on a JEM 2100 operated at 200kV (Kevin Freedman & Rosemary Bastian).Photo: Gold nanoparticles with an average diameter of 25 nm were prepared by adding a drop of the gold solution onto a holey carbon film and allowed to evaporate.  Bright filed images were taken on a JEM 2100 operated at 200kV (Kevin Freedman & Rosemary Bastian).Photo: A HIV pseudo-virus (non-infectious) generated in vitro and stained with uranyl acetate on a carbon film.  Images were taken with a TEM (JEM 2100) operated at 200 kV (Kevin Freedman & Rosemary Bastian).