909 Photos - Sep 14, 2010
Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: A jet airliner is lined up on one of the World Trade Center towers in New York Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. In the most devastating terrorist onslaughts ever waged against the United States, knife-wielding hijackers crashed two airliners into the World Trade Center on Tuesday, toppling its twin 110-story towers. (AP Photo/Carmen Taylor)Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: TO GO WITH AFP STORY
Cuban Ivonne Molina works on her old Singer sewing machine at her house in Havana on September 13, 2010. Cuba will eliminate more than half a million state jobs over the next six months as part of a push to raise productivity in the communist-ruled island, the country's main labor organization said Monday. Workers laid off from government jobs will no longer be sent home with partial pay, but will have to find other means to make a living, the Cuban Worker's Central, or CTC by its Spanish acronym, said.  AFP PHOTO/STR (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)Photo: A watchmaker reads the newspaper in Havana on September 24, 2010. Cuba is to allow some houses to be rented in US dollars for the first time in 50 years as well as the opening up of small businesses as it seeks to shed 500,000 public jobs, state media said Friday. AFP PHOTO/STR (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)Photo: A man transports a mattress in Havana on September 24, 2010. Cuba is to allow some houses to be rented in US dollars for the first time in 50 years as well as the opening up of small businesses as it seeks to shed 500,000 public jobs, state media said Friday. AFP PHOTO/STR (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Police handcuff and arrest street entertainer 'Omar' in Havana October 6, 2010. After 20 years of making his living unlawfully by dressing up like a Cuban revolutionary and posing for tips for tourist photos in Old Havana, 64-year-old Omar is now hoping he can make a legal career of it. He wants to get one of 250,000 licenses for small businesses the Cuban government plans to start issuing this month so he can work without fear of official reprisals.  REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (CUBA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT CRIME LAW)Photo: Police handcuff and arrest street entertainer 'Omar' in Havana October 6, 2010. After 20 years of making his living unlawfully by dressing up like a Cuban revolutionary and posing for tips for tourist photos in Old Havana, 64-year-old Omar is now hoping he can make a legal career of it. He wants to get one of 250,000 licenses for small businesses the Cuban government plans to start issuing this month so he can work without fear of official reprisals.  REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (CUBA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT CRIME LAW)Photo: Street entertainer 'Omar' is driven away in a police car after being arrested in Havana October 6, 2010. After 20 years of making his living unlawfully by dressing up like a Cuban revolutionary and posing for tips for tourist photos in Old Havana, 64-year-old Omar is now hoping he can make a legal career of it. He wants to get one of 250,000 licenses for small businesses the Cuban government plans to start issuing this month so he can work without fear of official reprisals.  REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (CUBA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT CRIME LAW)Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo:                                Photo:                                Photo:                                Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: 391754 02: Chairperson Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL), left, smiles at actor Isaac Hayes July 11, 2001 prior to a hearing before the House of Representatives International Operations and Human Rights Subcommittee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)⮖Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Wikileaks founder Julian Assange looks on during a press conference at the Geneva Press Club on November 4, 2010 in Geneva. Assange called on the United States to open up "instead of covering up" following the website's release of secret US documents allegedly showing abuse in the Iraq war.  WikiLeaks, which portrays itself as a whistle-blowing media outlet, released last week an unprecedented 400,000 classified US documents on the Iraq war, and in July posted 77,000 secret US files on the Afghan conflict.  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