29 Photos - Jun 30, 2010
Photo: A Nanostation M5 and Nanostation M2 Loco hung on a mast fashioned from 1/2" EMT conduit, with improvised shielding.Photo: A Nanostation M5 and Nanostation M2 Loco hung on a mast fashioned from 1/2" EMT conduit, with improvised shielding.  Note the hose clamps holding the radios to the mast.Photo: Homemade "RF Armor" for Nanostation fashioned out of a piece of metal 2x6" stud with cutouts for status LEDs and mounting arms.Photo: Homemade "RF Armor" for Nanostation fashioned out of a piece of metal 2x6" stud.Photo: Homemade shield on Nanostation Loco, with pole mount fashioned from u-bolt, angle bracket, short length of 1/2" EMT conduit, and conduit clipsPhoto: Temporary 10foot tripod for Nanostation M5 made from aluminum light stand.  The roof hatch is resting on the stand's legs since it was gusty.Photo: Temporary installation with UBNT Bullet M5 for backhaul and Nanostation 2 for the AP, using a salvaged camera tripodPhoto: The cardboard tube from rolls of paper towels or toilet paper makes your patch-cable-filled life much much easier.Photo: 20foot mast with Ubiquiti Nanostation M5 at the topPhoto: Another temorary roof mount using a camera tripod, a 10foot piece of conduit, and bricks lashed on to keep it from blowing away.Photo: A Nanostation M5 and EOC-1650 (powered by the NSM5), strapped to the top of a homemade tripod.Photo: Base of tripod made from three 1" electrical conduits bent into shape, also showing the 4x4's that form the base and the tension straps for stiffening the legs.Photo: The joint for the homemade conduit tripod, awaiting drill holes for the bolts to hold it all together.Photo: A home-made cat5 patch cable to connect a 2.4GHz access point to the secondary LAN port of a Ubiquiti Nanostation M5.  Note the shielded RJ45 plug and ground wire on one end.Photo: 10foot mast with Ubiquiti Bullet2HP access point with 15.5dB panel antenna.  The mast is constructed from 0.5" electrical conduit inserted into an old mount for a TV antenna.Photo: Homemade mounting arrangement for a Ubiquiti Bullet2HP access point with 15.5dB panel antenna and a 0.5" mast.  Everything is held to the mast using electrical conduit clips, with the horizontal strips placed to prevent the panel from swiveling in the wind.Photo: 10foot mast with Ubiquiti Bullet2HP access point with a homemade cantenna.  The mast is constructed from 0.5" electrical conduit inserted into an old mount for a TV antenna.Photo: A closeup of how we fashioned a pole-mount for an old 15dB panel antenna using conduit clips and mending plates (the horizontal strips).  The plates are actually not fixed to the back of panel; they're just bent slightly to provide tension and prevent the panel from swiveling around the mast.Photo: This is a Ubiquiti Bullet2HP access point (attached just 2feet below the dipole, tho not visible), a 12dB omni dipole antenna, and roof tripod anchored with cinderblocks.Photo: Wiring up a roof-top antenna mast.  Note that the mast tripod is not bolted to the roof, just anchored with cinderblocks.Photo: Wiring up the mast for WasabiNet-bolita, a Ubiquiti Bullet2HP access point with a 12dB dipole.Photo: This is a scavenged tripod base we used for a 10foot+ rooftop mast.  The wood is just spare, treated lumber that was sitting around handy, fastened with 1/4in bolts. As evident in the photo, the hen approves of this construction.Photo: This is temporary roof tripod fashioned from a salvaged camera tripod, bricks, lots of cable ties, and electrical conduit.  This is testing out an Ubiquiti Bullet2HP access point with 12dB dipole antenna.Photo: An installation of Open Mesh OM1P in outdoor enclosure.  The unshielded cat5 line is fed through the (grounded) metal mast to help protect against static charge buildup.  Likewise, the RJ45 plug inside the enclosure has a small ground wire running to a screw-terminal on the mast.Photo: Example outdoor mount for Open-Mesh OM1P enclosure.  Note the shielded RJ45 connector with foil and ground wire, the screw terminal on the mast (to attach the ground wire), and the cat5 fed inside the mast for additional shielding.Photo: An Engenius EOC-1650, strapped to a grounded metal mast, with a small ground wire running from the RJ45 plug to a pipe clamp on the mast.  Since the cat5 is unshielded, it is fed through the interior of the metal mast to help protect against static charge buildup.Photo: A ground wire crimped with unshielded cat5 into a shielded RJ45 plug.  Not visible in the photo is a small bit of aluminum foil which I wrapped around the cat5 sheath before inserting it into the plug to be crimped.Photo: A metal antenna mast grounded with 12awg copper wire and a screw clamp.Photo: Temporary cantenna for All Along Press.