131 Photos - Dec 6, 2010
Photo: Flood waters brought down power lines and buildings alike.Photo: Photo: A Winsted Water Rescue vehicle prepares for work.Photo: Water up to 10 feet high in some places smashed mercilessly against buildings, such as the Gilbert Clock Building Two shown here.Photo: Water raged through the Gilbert Clock Company in Winsted.Photo: Roads suffered heavy damage as well, such as this one near the dam at the Gilbert Clock Company.Photo: Citizens watch waters pouring through the streets by the Gilbert Clock Company Building Four.Photo: An entire corner of this Gilbert Clock Company building collapsed.Photo: Church Street bridge in TorringtonPhoto: Many factories in the area suffered massive damage.Photo: Mud and filth covered machines everywhere.Photo: Factory damagePhoto: Factory damagePhoto: Businesses along Main Street in Torrington suffered substantial water damage.Photo: Buildings at the corner of Main and Water Streets partially collapsed when the Naugatuck River raged through.Photo: Rapid Dairy Transport provides nourishment for flood victims.Photo: Debris lines the outer edges of this parking lot.Photo: Emergency workers worked around the clock.Photo: Debris piled up in many areas of Torrington and Winsted.Photo: These businesses once stood where the Torrington Plaza now exists, along South Main Street by the river.Photo: Flood waters exposed sewage pipes when roads collapsed.Photo: Exposed sewage pipesPhoto: Workers stand in a flood-damaged building.Photo: The Mad River tore through Winsted's Main Street, leaving nothing but rubble in its wake.Photo: Lumber from the Hotchkiss Lumber Company in Torrington came to rest next to the Naugatuck River.Photo: Flood survivors had to drink from canvas bags due to water contamination.Photo: Flood waters in Winsted were at one point higher than utility poles, as evidenced by the remains of a car left hanging on power lines.Photo: A young survivor receives a new dress after her home was destroyed by the flood.Photo: Shoes are given to a young survivor.Photo: Cars outside a service station in Winsted are buried in rubble up to their roofs.Photo: Cars are piled with debris along the banks of the Mad River.Photo: Lower Main Street in WinstedPhoto: In the center of this photo is where a taxi stand was once located, before flood waters caused the building to collapse.Photo: This concrete abutment was not enough to hold back the Mad River.Photo: National Guard members patrolled Winsted streets after martial law was declared.Photo: Officials plan the best routes to deliver military aid to Winsted.Photo: The remains of a collapsed Winsted homePhoto: Main Street in Winsted was literally torn apart by flood waters.Photo: A collapsed garage roofPhoto: Typhoid shots were given at Winsted's emergency headquarters, which were set up at Central School (now Pearson Middle School).Photo: This car was parked in downtown Winsted when the flood waters came through.Photo: This car was a brand-new car in a showroom before the river washed it out into the street.Photo: A collapsed home in TorringtonPhoto: The third floor is all that was left of the Bannon Block in Winsted.Photo: A National Guard member stands guard in the early days following the flood.Photo: Photo: Then Governor Abraham Ribicoff speaks with President Dwight D. Eisenhower.Photo: An aid helicopter takes off from a makeshift airport at Central School.Photo: President Dwight D. Eisenhower arrives to survey the damage.Photo: Press Chief James Hagerty arrives with the President.Photo: Residents relaxed as much as was possible at the emergency headquarters at Central School.Photo: Food was given out in an open-air kitchen.Photo: A National Guard member stands guard at the corner of Main Street.Photo: Newly-homeless residents are given food at the emergency shelter.Photo: Residents eat at the emergency headquarters at Central School.Photo: A National Guardsman keeps an eye out for looters.Photo: Debris clutters the street.Photo: Hotel Winchester was among the buildings damaged by the flood.Photo: Connecticut Light and Power's Winsted headquarters suffered damage.Photo: One of Winsted's largest new car dealers once stood on this empty lot. The only remains of the business were the steel supports.Photo: The owner of the business on the right was one of Winsted's flood victims.Photo: This area of Main Street was among the hardest hit.Photo: The Unionville Bridge suffered massive damage in the floods.Photo: This was a three-story building before the flood.Photo: A meal is distributed at Central School.Photo: Soldiers leave Hartford with a "duck" - an amphibious tank - to bring supplies to Winsted.Photo: U.S. Army Engineers Chief S. D. Sturgis estimated damage in the Northeast at $1.6 billion, the equivalent of about $13 billion today.Photo: All that remained of the businesses along the Main Street bridge in Torrington were the rooftops.Photo: The remains of a new 1955 carPhoto: Typhoid shots were given to prevent disease.Photo: An Army "duck" brings supplies to flood-ravaged Torrington.Photo: Wrecked cars lie smashed against a house.Photo: Vehicles and debris fill the parking lot of Stanley's Live Bait in West Torrington.Photo: Workers remove dirt and debris during cleanup efforts.Photo: Debris piled up everywhere.Photo: Photo: Water rushes under the roofs of what were once businesses on the Main Street bridge.Photo: Residents pick their way through debris.Photo: Devastation on South Main StreetPhoto: Buildings were ruined as pieces were collapsed or torn away by flood waters.Photo: The factory at Nutmeg Hardware was hard-hit.Photo: Nutmeg HardwarePhoto: The view down northern Main Street from the parking lot of what was then Fitzgeralds.Photo: Torrington's Center Square one year after the flood.Photo: A car is buried under what was once a road.Photo: Mud fills the sheet metal department at the American Brass Company in Torrington.Photo: The Palmer Street bridge was washed down to where Iffland Lumber now exists.Photo: The Palmer Street bridge was swept away in the flood.Photo: The Church Street Bridge one year later.Photo: Water pours over the edge of a washed-away street.Photo: Flood waters several feet deep swallowed homes and businesses.Photo: A victim of the flood was found under this pile of debris.Photo: The view down Main Street in Winsted.Photo: A collapsed building at the corner of Bridge and Main Streets.Photo: Residents look out over the pile of debris that is Main Street.Photo: Debris was piled several feet high in some locations.Photo: An aerial shot of Torrington several years later shows damage from the flood that still lingered.Photo: Senator Prescott Bush, grandfather of President George W. Bush, surveys the damage.Photo: These businesses, located on South Main Street, suffered damage from the flood.Photo: Cars after the flood. Photo courtesy of Edward Adams Jr.Photo: Debris from the flood. Photo courtesy of Edward Adams Jr.Photo: The street in front of this Gulf station in Winsted was torn up by the waters. Photo courtesy of Edward Adams Jr.Photo: This was the view just south of Carnell Company on Willow Street. Photo courtesy of Edward Adams Jr.Photo: Photo: Photo: Main Street. Photo courtesy of Edward Adams Jr.Photo: The remains of the Adams family car. Photo courtesy of Edward Adams Jr.Photo: St. Joseph's Church in Winsted. Photo courtesy of Edward Adams Jr.Photo: A wrecked storefront. Photo courtesy of Edward Adams Jr.Photo: Bolomey's in Torrington. Photo courtesy of Edward Adams Jr.Photo: Street view of the destruction. Photo courtesy of Edward Adams Jr.Photo: View looking south down Torrington's Main Street. Photo taken by John William McElhone, submitted by Jack Sheedy.Photo: The intersection of Main and East Main Streets. Photo taken by John William McElhone, submitted by Jack Sheedy.Photo: The corner of Main and Water Streets, looking toward Franklin Street. Photo taken by John William McElhone, submitted by Jack Sheedy.Photo: View of the corner of Main and Water Streets. Photo taken by John William McElhone, submitted by Jack Sheedy.Photo: The view north up Main Street, taken from the corner of Main and Water Streets. Photo taken by John William McElhone, submitted by Jack Sheedy.Photo: Debris piled up by the East Albert Street bridge. Photo taken by John William McElhone, submitted by Jack Sheedy.Photo: Looking east down Main Street. Photo taken by John William McElhone, submitted by Jack Sheedy.Photo: Flood waters rage by the American Brass Company. Photo taken by John William McElhone, submitted by Jack Sheedy.Photo: Looking west on Franklin Street. Photo taken by John William McElhone, submitted by Jack Sheedy.Photo: A house is left leaning following the flood. Photo taken by John William McElhone, submitted by Jack Sheedy.Photo: Flooding in East Litchfield. Photo taken by John William McElhone, submitted by Jack Sheedy.Photo: Flooding in East Litchfield. Photo taken by John William McElhone, submitted by Jack Sheedy.Photo: Flooding at the Torrington Gas Company. Photo taken by John William McElhone, submitted by Jack Sheedy.Photo: Devastation in West Torrington. Photo taken by John William McElhone, submitted by Jack Sheedy.Photo: A taxi is destroyed by flood debris. Photo taken by John William McElhone, submitted by Jack Sheedy.Photo: George Hough stands by the remains of his house. Photo taken by John P. Sheedy, submitted by Jack Sheedy.Photo: The back of the Sheedys' house. The garage was swept away by flood waters. Photo taken by John P. Sheedy, submitted by Jack Sheedy.Photo: The Farmington River returns to its banks in New Hartford. Photo taken by John P. Sheedy, submitted by Jack Sheedy.Photo: Flood damage at the Sheedy house in New Hartford. Photo taken by John P. Sheedy, submitted by Jack Sheedy.Photo: Flood damage. Photo taken by Marion M. Sheedy, submitted by Jack Sheedy.