565 Photos - Sep 23, 2012
Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Looking down the centerboard trunk you can see the friction device that holds the centerboard in whatever position you preferPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: The wet outer (left) board fit in place and screwed down.Photo: Boiling water poured over a towel wrapped around the board and left for 10 minutes was enough to give the board enough flexibility to be fit.Photo: The brass bar is shaped to the profile of the board.Photo: The outer floorboard has a twist near its forward end.  To prevent splitting the floorboard I cut a slot for a brass bar to prevent most the twist from happening at the tip and causing a split at the screw.Photo: Drilling the pilot hole for the threaded insert that will hold the floorboards to the floors.Photo: Screwing in the threaded insertPhoto: Test fitting the floorboardsPhoto: Photo: Photo: The first coat of varnish on the gunwhalesPhoto: The gudgeons permanently mounted on the stem.Photo: Gluing the oarlock pads to the gunwhale.Photo: Photo: Photo: Flipping the boat over using some ratchet straps hung from rafters.Photo: Turn dogs for the hatches.Photo: Photo: Photo: Test fitting the completed center board.Photo: Results after sanding to 400 grit and then using micro-mesh wet sanding system which has a 9 step alternate grit scale starting at 1500 through 12000 gritPhoto: You can see the "orange peel" look to the paint at this stage.  I've just layered coat after coat of paint on with a 1/4" foam roller.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: I couldn't resist pulling the boat out of the shop and play with the rigging.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Test fitting the mockup rudder.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: My first attempt at stitching the leather on the mizzen mast.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: The ipe shoe really makes the full length keel look right.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Test fitting the gudgeons on the aft stemPhoto: Chris did the final shaping of the gudgeons during fitting.Photo: Photo: A quick and dirty jig for bending the half oval for the hull rub strips/runners.Photo: Photo: Photo: A temporary screw holds the rub strip in place during fitting.Photo: I made a jig to hold the half-oval brass strip while I ground the end to 45deg.Photo: Photo: After the epoxy cured, I carefully routed out the CB slot.Photo: I epoxied the ipe shoe onto the keel with GFlex.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: The final coat of epoxy is down.  One more light sanding to prep the surface for paint should do it.Photo: This contraption holds a few squares of fiberglass to the inside forward edge of the CB slot until it cures.Photo: Rub strips will protect the bottom strakes when hauled up on a beach.Photo: Photo: The ipe shoe cut to just proud of the scribe lines.Photo: This ipe shoe will protect the bottom of the keel during beach landings and such.Photo: Photo: I sprayed some cheap paint onto the surface of the ipe to show the scribe lines a bit better.Photo: The heel of the mast finally tapered on three sides.Photo: Photo: I removed the bulk of material with a saw and used a jack plane to taper the heel of the mast.Photo: Photo: Testing the Centerboard for fit.Photo: Chris is inspecting the clearance at the aft end of the CB trunkPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Fiberglassing the forward section of the CB trunkPhoto: Lining up several layers of fiberglass before applying to the CB trunk over the CB pinPhoto: Photo: Photo: Several layers of fiberglass are built up and wetted out prior to applying to the inside of the CB trunk to protect the exposed joints between the CB trunk, keelson, planks and keel.Photo: Photo: A shot of the inside of the CB trunk after the left side of is glassed.Photo: Photo: Even pressure is applied to the layers of glass on the inside of the CB trunkPhoto: a gap in the CB trunk is filled with douglas fir before being routed flush on the inside and glassed over.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: bevelling the keel at the transition to the stemPhoto: Photo: Photo: My neighbor Iain stopped by to supervise the flipping of the boatPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: a perfect fit.Photo: A bit of epoxy on the inspection port rabbet.Photo: Shaping the main mast from eight sided to sixteen sided.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: First coat of paint on the bilge and floors.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: I used a mock main mast to double check the mizzen alignment.Photo: Photo: Photo: After leveling the boat - side-to side, I used a plumb bob to align the mizzen partner on center line before marking and gluing.Photo: The glue-up of the thwart gets a thourough inspection by the project engineer.Photo: Cleaning up the squeezed out epoxy on the main mast partners.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: The bench slid further out to reveal the floatation tank inspection port and small drain.Photo: The bench partially slid out.  There will be three french cleats per bench.  Two on each end (bulkhead and thwart) and one near the middle.Photo: Here you can see the two halves of the french cleat holding down the bench at the thwart.Photo: I used carpet tape to properly align the french cleat to the underside of the bench before fastening it down.Photo: First coat of clear epoxy on the forward knees and bulkhead trim.Photo: Test fitting my dummy mast.Photo: Test fitting the mast partners before drilling a pilot hole into the mast box through the deck.Photo: Photo: Photo: Couldn't resist seeing what the benches look like on the boat after the fist coat of epoxy.Photo: Finished putting the second coat of clear epoxy on the bench slats.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Testing the fit.  we'll cut these plastic mockups to fit before cutting the final bronze pieces.Photo: My friend Jim cut these test pintles and gudgeons from plastic on his CNC machine.  Here Chris is testing the fit before sending off final revisions to Jim & crew.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Test fitting the bench tops before I cut the rest of them.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: A keyhole cleat Chris devised for the uphaul on the prototype rudder.  It works REALLY well.Photo: Test fitting the foredeckPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Before putting on the decks, I put four coats of Bilgekote below.Photo: Photo: Photo: Chris built a mockup rudder for fitting and sorting out the hardware detailsPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Adding a cross brace on the floatation tank to support the slatted bench tops near the thwart positionPhoto: Photo: Photo: Hatch stop laminated and glued in placePhoto: Cutting out the center to make a spacer between the bulkhead and the hatch "stop".Photo: Photo: I needed four ovals with the same outside diameter for the hatch spacers and stops.  I shaped the first one by hand and used it as a template for the other three.Photo: Finally got around to gluing in the aft king plank.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: The interior of the mast box before gluing on the final side.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Chirs, laminating up the main mastPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: My Dad took on the job of building the oars.  Here he's laminating the stock.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Test fitting the aft deckPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Chris' mock-ups of the rudder hardwarePhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Alternate version of mast partners.  This version preserves the lines of the kingplank.Photo: Photo: Planing the tapers on the mizzen mastPhoto: Photo: Testing a possible option for the mizzen mast partnerPhoto: Photo: Photo: The blank for the mizzen stepPhoto: Photo: Determining the angles for the mizzen mast with a few pieces of scrap.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Epoxy gluing the blank for one of the breasthooksPhoto: Photo: Laminating the boom.Photo: Laying out some patterns for the forward bench topPhoto: I glued in a 5/8" by 2" backing in the forward floatation tank to accomodate pad eyes in the cockpit to secure cargo etc.Photo: Photo: Chris'  jig for scarfing the spar stockPhoto: Inspection port for the top of the floatation tank as well as a drain to channel water to the bilge.Photo: Planing the sitka spruce stock before laminating the spars.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Test fitting the floatation tank sidePhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Testing a friction device on a mockup centerboardPhoto: Photo: First draft for a pattern for the under-bench floatation tank.Photo: Photo: Testing a centerboard mockupPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: After the epoxy cured, I put a fillet on the aft seam and filled the front seam.Photo: The template for the forward bulkhead.  I used hot-melt glue to attach some card stock to conform to the shape of the laps.Photo: I stapled a few tape covered MDF pads to help hold the bulkhead in place during glue-upPhoto: The hatch was cut out and I epoxied the bulkhead in placePhoto: Photo: Test fitting the aft bulkheadPhoto: Fitting the template for the aft bulkhead.Photo: Template for the aft bulkhead.Photo: Attaching the last starboard inwale.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: The finished taper.Photo: I used a power planer to taper the inner inwales from 5/8ths down to 3/8ths at either end and finished up with a hand plane.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Finished bevel.Photo: Cutting a bevel on one of the in-wales.Photo: The inner in-wale requires the bevelling of one side.  This is a jig that does that nicely on the thickness planer.Photo: Milling the inwales to the proper thickness.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Testing the fit of the rubstrip joint.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Finally!  Freeing the boat from the building frame.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: After scraping and sanding the hull, I laid on a couple of coats of CPES penetrating epoxy as a sealer.Photo: The keel is on the boat an cured.  I need to do some shaping on the side bevels of the keel yet.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Attaching the stems, skeg, keel and keel rub strakes all in one fell swoop.Photo: Final test fit and masking off the keel.Photo: Masking off in preparation for attaching the "outbone"Photo: Looking aft showing the taper of the keel rub strakes.  The screws are to temporarily fasten the rub strakes to the skeg while shaping and fitting.Photo: Looking forward along the keel.Photo: Ultimately a 3/16ths thick brass sole will be attached to the keel and the edges of the rub strakes bevelled to a pleasing shape.Photo: One of the keel rub strakes cut.  This photo shows the fine taper to the strake.Photo: I removed the bulk of the waste material for the taper with the bandsaw and finished to the line with a plane.Photo: I laid out the taper to the keel rub strakes with a long cedar batten.Photo: Detail of the keel rub strakes at the center board trunk slot.Photo: Planing the tops of the keel rub strakes to match the keel and skeg.Photo: The aft stem temporarily screwed on to the boat with the bevel cut.Photo: I opted for a longer design for the keel rub strakes.  Here the roughed out rub strakes are being test fitted to the keel.Photo: The keel rub strakes will be much longer and tapered more than what is called for on the plans.Photo: Cutting the bevel on the bow stem.Photo: Photo: Photo: The design for the center board trunk changed so the CB trunk slot need to be widened a bit.  A router bit with the following bearing on the top, a scrap of 1/8" plywood tacked 3/16ths outboard and some wedges did the trick.Photo: Test fitting the skegPhoto: Test fitting the aft stem and skeg.Photo: Spiling the hull shape onto the skeg.Photo: The planking is completed!Photo: The final plank on.  It's starting to look like a boat!Photo: Photo: Photo: Another shot of the test fit of the final strake.  I decided to completely cover the shear strakes with tape to protect them as they will be finished bright.Photo: The first shear strake.  The blue tape protected the plank from epoxy drips during the glue-up and subsequent clean-up.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Test fitting the next plank.Photo: This method makes quick and accurate patterns for the planks.  The plank I made from this pattern fit perfectly and needed no further tweaking.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: