30 Photos - Jul 16, 2012
Photo: Photo: Photo: Key Marco wet site materials.  Part of a net system.Photo: Remains of prehistoric weir elements on a finger of Puegot Sound.  Qwugues site, Washington.  At very low tide the weir elements are exposed.Photo: Akira Matsui. a Japanese archaeologist, looking at stake elements from a wet site in Washington (low tide exposes the weir remains). More on the northwest coast - follow this link http://wsm.wsu.edu/s/we.php?id=192Photo: If you are near water, there are fish.  Fish are on the table in most prehistoric socieites.  The question is 'How to harvest them most effeciently?'    This guys was released a few minutes later.  Fishing pressure and environmental change, changes in water use and demand have to be factored in when looking at archaeological subsistence reconstructions.   How could you more effectively/effeciently harvest from these waters to feed your family?Photo: Florida fish weir/trap as illustrated in early historic documents.   There are fewer than ten weirs identified in the Florida record.  Surely there are hundreds more out there.  We just have not identified or recorded them.  Where there are fish, there are generally weirs.Photo: Not too small to eat.  But, hardly effective for feeding the family.  About  size 18 bead headed nymph for the serious fisher folks.  Note:  this was on a catch-and-release stream in New York and he was dutifully released.Photo: Florida has so much water, both coastal and fresh, that fishing was a major subsistence activity in our state.  It clearly shows up in the archaeologicl record.Photo: St. Johns River provided lots of resources to the folks living along its shores.  Headwater in Brevard County.Photo: Upstate New York - again a perfect setting for a rock weir for harvest massive quantities of fish with a minimum of effort.  Where there are fish that move upstream to spawn the productivity of weirs increases dramatically.Photo: Fishing also includes shellfishing. Shellfish really appear to come into the diet about 6,000 years ago.  Photo courtesy of Amanda Evans.  Prehistoric oysters from a Gulf site.Photo: Florida prehistoric shell midden with lots of fish remains in it (Pine Island, Florida).Photo: Prehistoric weir remains (Japan). Courtesy of Akira Matsui. Matsui is a specialist in faunal analysis and has studied salmon fishing in Japan http://www.anthro.fsu.edu/pdf/matsui1996.pdf  Momijiyama No.49 site at Ishikari city, Hokkaido. The Middle Jomon, about 4000 BP.  Photo courtesy of Akira Matsui and Board of Education, Ishikari City, which funded the project.Photo: Weir elements in Japan. Wet site with large dewatering system to allow excavations.  Photo courtesy of Akira Matsui and Board of Education, Ishikari City, which funded the project.  Another section of Momijiyama No. 49.Photo: Hurdles or matting for fish weirs in abandoned river channel (Japan).  Photo courtesy of Akira Matsui and Board of Education, Ishikari City, which funded the project.  Another section of Momijiyama No. 49.Photo: Stakes from the weir (Japan).Photo courtesy of Akira Matsui and Board of Education, Ishikari City, which funded the project.  Another section of Momijiyama No. 49.Photo: Details of ties on weir elements.  Photo courtesy of Akira Matsui and Board of Education, Ishikari City, which funded the project. Momijiyama No. 49.  Japan has many world-class archaeology and anthropology museums http://www.nbz.or.jp/eng/Photo: Material from the Momijiyama area excavations.  Item similar to a ritual salmon stick used by the Ainu.  Photo courtesy of Akira Matsui and Board of Education, Ishikari City, which funded the project. Momijiyama No. 49.Photo: Humpback salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) being caught after spawning by a weir at Tokoro town in Hokkaido, Japan.  Photo courtesy of Akira Matsui.Photo: The weir at Tokoro Town.  Such traps are very efficient.  Photo courtesy of Akira Matsui.Photo: Net fishing for dog salmon (Oncorhynchus keta)  at the Tokachi River In Hokkaido.  Photo courtesy of Akira Matsui.  Netting is highly productive as well.Photo: Netted dog salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) at the Tokachi River in Hokkaido.  Photo courtesy of Akira Matsui.Photo: The modern salt dried salmon of Murakami city, Niigata Prefecture. Their traditional method for storage during winter.  Photo courtesy of Akira Matsui.Photo: Whole north Circum-Pacific had a strong salmon orientation and a long fishing tradition stretching back thousands of years http://www.anthro.fsu.edu/pdf/Erlandson_2008.pdf
  Dog salmon illustrated  at Niigata Prefecture, AD 1840 during the Edo Period.Photo: Modern recreation of net, baskets and other fiber items that people all over the world would have had (and which seldom survive in the archaeological record).Photo: Old Posey Bar oyster midden.  An archaeological site of the recent past which will last for thousands of years.  St. Marks River, Florida.Photo: Mullet.  Both the bones and the scales sometimes survive in the right kind of archaeological sites.Photo: Deer bone (?) harpoons.  The one in the center still has some glue from the hafting.  About 7,000 years old from Windover, a Florida wet site (Brevard County).Photo: Turtles are also 'fished' for and netted.  Obviously,  they have lots of parts that preserve.