49 Photos - Aug 25, 2013
Photo: Alex and Judi welcome you to visit the new wetlands when you are in the area.Photo: A series of 4-wetlands were restored on the Tulaberry Farm near Castlegar, British Columbia.Photo: Landowners Alex Berland (center) and Judi Morton (right) help survey the new wetlands.Photo: Irene Manley with the BC Ministry of Environment shows a Columbia Spotted Frog.  The wetlands were designed for use by this species.Photo: Irene Manley places the Columbia Spotted Frog in a safe place so construction can take place in the nearby field.Photo: The excavator builds a buried vertical grade control structure at the outlet of the wetland project to prevent a head-cut from advancing into the wetland project area.  The head-cut would cause great erosion and lower the elevation of groundwater if not stopped.Photo: The vertical grade control structure, made from the large logs, was buried in the foreground.  The wetlands will be restored upstream from this structure, in the field on the right.Photo: A 100 Series Excavator is used to restore the wetlands from a field that had been created from draining wetlands years ago.Photo: The children enjoyed playing on the pile of topsoil, that was later spread in the completed wetland.Photo: Irene Manley spreads aquatic seeds she has collected on the soil surrounding the restored wetlands.Photo: Native willows and dogwoods are planted near the restored wetlands by Thor Smestad.Photo: Alex paints the stems of the planted trees to reduce beaver damage.  Sand was mixed with the paint.Photo: Cary Jessup was the skilled excavator operator who built the wetlands.Photo: This wetland was restored only hours earlier.Photo: Small islands were placed in the restored wetlands to promote animal and plant diversity.  The wetland is one-day old in this photo.Photo: Turtles can be expected to bask on the logs placed in the wetlands.Photo: The wetlands were built in different shapes and sizes.Photo: The wetlands were built with gradual slopes to promote plant diversityPhoto: One can imagine an otter using the large log placed in this new wetland.Photo: Care was taken to protect adjoining trees and shrubs from disturbance.Photo: The logs will be used for perches by birds, and as basking sites for turtles.Photo: Clumps of sedge were planted around the restored wetlands.Photo: Some of the wetlands were restored in the forest.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: