152 Photos - Nov 11, 2014
Photo: Ice box lid and counter at start of project.Photo: 12V Alder-Barbour Cold Machine added by previous owner.  We plan to reuse this unit.Photo: Looking down into ice box with lid removed.Photo: The evaporator is mounted on aft wall of ice box and thermostat control nob is on the wall adjacent to the companionway steps.Photo: The coolant line fed through the wall into the engine compartment then around to the condenser unit in the cockpit locker.Photo: bulkhead between cockpit locker and ice box is covered with what appears to be silly string.  I'm unsure if this is an attempt at insulation? Sound dampening?  Both?   The hand pump upper left evacuated the ice box. Lower right is engine raw water filter.  Everything is this image is going to change.Photo: Ahh... a blank canvas on which to begin.Photo: This shelf served as a mount for the Alder-Barbour condenser unit.Photo: Initially I plotted to re-insulate the ice box from the opening at the top.  Limited access from this approach lead me to the realization that job could be more easily and with a better outcome if I cut into the ice box through the bulkhead aft.  I know that this decision is going to alarm some of the residents of the Morgan 38 user group, but stay tuned all will be well...I used a circular saw for the straight cuts and a jig saw for the curve along the hull.Much to my surprise this bulkhead consists of two 1/2" plywood sections separated by 1/2 to 3/4".Photo: Removing the forward 1/2" plywood bulkhead revealed the crispy, open cell insulation around the ice box.Photo: The aft section of  insulation was detached from ice box and fell away cleanly once I cut the perimeter with a razor kinfe.I am seeking to install 4 to 6 inches of insulation.  The original ice box only has 1-1/2 to 2 inches of insulation.Photo: Excavating the ice box... twin 1/2" plywood bulkheads, then 1-1/2 to 2 inches of open cell foam separate the inner wall of the ice box from the cockpit locker.The bulkheads are both tabbed to the hull along their aft faces.  This set up is a fantastic discovery as it will allow me to easily construct a stout 1-1/2" rib along the hull and move the full bulk head aft a few inches to maintain the size of the ice box while increasing the insulation thickness.Photo: Close up of original open cell foam used by Morgan to insulate the ice box.  I'm guessing this was poured into place as a two part expanding foam.Photo: Hose on left is new 1-1/4" bilge pump discharge line, hose on right is original ice box drain.I plan to run an additional bilge pump discharge hose and the propane line through the tunnel on the left.Photo: I want to re-use fiberglass walls of the original ice box and thus attempted to make my cuts as close as possible to the corners of the box.Photo: Aft wall of Ice box removed.Photo: With the aft wall of the ice box removed. I was able to make the remaining cuts from the cockpit locker.Photo: I discovered that bridging the jigsaw base across a corner with the blade centered worked very well for making cuts inside the boxPhoto: A few of the cuts had to be completed by hand.Photo: The original ice box drain consisded of a 90 degree elbow  set in a mixture of foam and epoxy.  Judging by the mold in the surrounding area, I confident the ice box leaked around the drain.Photo: Exterior of ice box drain.Photo: Ice box and insulation removed.  I am dismayed that Morgan Yachts did not tab the wall on the aft side of the galley to the hull.  There is a 3/4" to 1-1/4" gap between the hull and the  wall.Photo: Base of wall that separates ice box from engine compartment. It is surprising to me that Morgan Yachts did not tab this wall to the hull. Adding tabbing here will strengthen the boat and better insulate the ice box from the heat of the engine.Photo: Looking at the inside of the hull under the ice boxPhoto: Looking down through the countertop with the ice box and insulation removed.Photo: filling the void between the two 1/2" plywood bulkheads with expanding foamPhoto: adding additional expanding foam to gaps around the bulkheads and vertical walls.The excess was trimmed away prior to adding tabbing.Photo: cutting 1708 cloth into sections for tabbing around ice boxPhoto: test fitting sections of new tabbing around ice boxPhoto: Double layers of cloth on twin 1/2" bulkheads will serve to tie to two pieces together and to the hull.Photo: new tabbing install in ice boxPhoto: Anne wetting out cloth for tabbingPhoto: tabbing added to ice box areaPhoto: Now that the remaining 5" of the twin bulkheads are bonded together they will serve as a stout rib under the new ice box insulation..Photo: Creating templates for the sides of the conduit to run under the ice box.Creating a water tight conduit for the bilge pump discharge hoses eliminates the possibility of water leaking into the foam under the ice box and thus the need to drill limber holes under the ice box. The conduit will also limit the flow of warm air under the ice box insulation.Photo: Marking out the 3" tall sides the conduit.  Using   1" fiberglass panel with a foam core  for the conduit.  This material will provide both strength and insulation.Photo: Test fitting the sides of the conduit.  Looking forward from the cockpit locker  towards the galley.Photo: Vertical sides of the conduit running under the ice box.  Creating a water tight conduit for the bilge pump discharge hoses eliminates the possibility of water leaking into the foam under the ice box and thus the need to drill limber holes under the ice box.Photo: Fitting 1708 cloth along the conduit walls. Using heavier cloth will add additional strength to hull.Photo: Sides are glassed in place.  Now to test fit the cap for conduit under ice box.Photo: Top of conduit glassed in place with 1708 cloth.Photo: Completed conduit under ice box.Photo: Tempating the curve of the hull for new bulkhead in cockpit locker.Photo: Transferring hull pattern to plywood for bulkhead mock up.Photo: test fitting bulkhead mock upPhoto: 1/4" thick Reflectix insulation installed on the outer perimeter of the ice box.Photo: The ingredients for the initial round of ice box insulation.  The 3M Super77 spray glue worked well with the Reflectix insulation.  I used 3M aluminum tape to seal the joints.Photo: Looking into the ice box from the galley at the Reflectix insulation installed on the outer perimeter of the ice box.Photo: Collection of foam board insulation at the ready in Pilgrim's salon.Photo: First round of foam board insulation goes down on the hull.  We hope to re-use the original, curved ice box floor.  To maintain the curve of the hull to match the original piece, I am insulating along the hull with narrow sections of foam.  Once in place, I will use foil tape to seal the seams.Photo: First layer on the side walls.Photo: Plotting out the curve of the hull on the foam board using a grid of measurments.Photo: connecting the dots to re-create the shape of the hull in the ice box.Photo: hope it fits well...Photo: The curve piece in place.  The curve was accurate, but the piece was too narrow overall.  I wedged 3/8" thick strips in along the outboard edge to fill the gap.Photo: First layer of foam board iinstalled on the forward wall.Photo: Time to lay out another section to fit the curve of the hull.Photo: Transferring measurements from the boat to the board and connecting the dots.Photo: two layers on 1" foam board on walls.Photo: one layer of reflectix and two layers of foam board brings the insulation nearly in-line with lip of original box.Photo: to build out the insulation flush with the lip of the original box I added a layer of 3/8" reflectix atop the foam.Photo: foil tape across the butt joint where the new insulation meets up the with lip of the original ice box.Photo: Looking down into the ice box with the insulation nearly completePhoto: 4" on the top, 4.5" on the sides and 6" on the bottom.Photo: It took me awhile to get my hands on a half sheet of 1/8" thick FRP for creating new ice box interior walls.  The material can be ordered from McMaster-Carr, but the cost of shipping a half sheet cost nearly as much as the material.  I finally discovered a piece on site that was available for purchase.Photo: using the outer most layer of 1" insulation as a template for the floor panel of the ice boxPhoto: Floor (top) and port (bottom) interior walls of ice box cut from 1/8" FRPPhoto: The upper FRP panels on interior of ice box will serve as anchors for the lower wall sections.  I epoxied these pieces to a 3/4" strip of wood that ran the perimeter of the opening under the level of the counter top. Unable to clamp the port side piece, I used screws to hold it in position.  These will be removed and the holes filled.Photo: Test fitting the forward and mid ship ice box walls. The cream colored, forward wall is from the original ice box construction. The green, mid ship wall is new FRP.Photo: The Alder-Barbour evaporator unit will be attached to the mid ship ice box wall. Laminating 1/4" plywood to the back of the 1/8" FRP will provide a more substantial surface for mounting the evaporator box.Photo: using cement blocks as weight while the epoxy between the FRP & plywood cures.Photo: Drilling out existing holes and abrading the surface on the two original ice box panels in preparation for filling existing holes. The backside of the newly laminated mid ship wall is on the left.Photo: Sealing the back side of the panels with duct tape prior to filling the holes.Photo: Mid-ship ice box wall with 1/4 plywood laminated on back (top) and foreward ice box wall with fairing on all patched holes (bottom)Photo: Aft ice box wall laminated atop 1/2" plywood panel (left) and fore ice box wall (right) with all the screw holes filled and faired.Photo: Adding an 18" long X 1/8" thick fiberglass angle to the front panel of the ice box.This piece will be part of a system of dividers in the box. It also serves to stiffen and straighten the fore panel. The clamps were necessary to remove the curve from the fiberglass panel.The screws securing the anlge to the panel are temporary and will be removed once the epoxy is cured.Photo: Photo: glueing in the mid-ship panel into the ice box.Photo: Dry fitting floor of ice box.  The floor is 1/8" FRP.  My hope was the floor could be installed as a single piece, but it would not fit.  I had to cut it into two pieces.Photo: Ice box floor clamped in place and ready for epoxy.Photo: Floor ready for epoxy and cloth.Improvised clamps screwed to rib hold floor in place. Horizontal, clamped wood holds forward wall in place.Photo: "Clamps" for holding ice box floor in position fabricated from scrap 2X2 lumberPhoto: Fillets of thickened epxoy with a 3" wide strip of fiberglass cloth at the corners. 3" cloth with thickened epoxy at the floor and front panel butt joints.Photo: Clamping ice box ceiling panels in placePhoto: Installing ceiling panels in ice boxPhoto: round one fairing filler in ice boxPhoto: round one fairing filler in ice boxPhoto: round one fairing filler post sandingPhoto: Various spreaders used for fillets and fairingPhoto: After Three rounds of fairing the ice box is ready for primer.Photo: After Three rounds of fairing the ice box is ready for primer.Photo: fillets along the lower, mid-ship side of the box.Photo: fillets and seams along the upper, port side of the box.Photo: Using screws and wooden blocks to temporarily hold aft panel in place while I trace the inside dimensions on the forward face.Photo: dimensions traced onto aft wall of ice box.Photo: Aft wall of ice box cut to shape with jigsaw, then fine tuned with grinder. It took 4 trips between the ice box and grinder to achieve a precise fit.Photo: Cockpilt locker view of aft, interior wall of ice box.Photo: Aft wall of ice box fits snugly in place.Photo: creating template for acrylic dividerPhoto: prepped and ready to apply primer to the inside of the ice box.This is my first time using Alexseal products.  In the past Interlux has been my go to paint manufacturer.Photo: three coats of primer on the aft ice box panel.Very pleased with the Alexseal primer.Photo: Aft panel with painting completed... three coats primer and three top coats.The Alexseal primer really impressed me.  The first coat of Alexseal top coat I nailed the proper amount of reducer and it went one very nicely. The second coat I used too little reducer and had some brush marks from tipping.  The final coat I used too much reducer and discovered a couple runs.  Practice makes perfect.Over all I am pleased with the Alexseal products.Photo: three coats of primer on the interior of the ice box.Very pleased with the Alexseal primer.Photo: Ice box with painting completed.  Three coats of primer and three top coats.The Alexseal primer really impressed me.  The first coat of Alexseal top coat I nailed the proper amount of reducer and it went one very nicely. The second coat I used too little reducer and had some brush marks from tipping.  The final coat I used too much reducer and discovered a couple runs.  Practice makes perfect.Over all I am pleased with the Alexseal products.Photo: masking aft ice box panel in preparation for installationPhoto: masking freshly painted ice box in preparation for installing aft panelPhoto: masking freshly painted ice box in preparation for installing aft panelPhoto: ready to add fairing along perimeter of aft ice box panelPhoto: duct tape and plastic bottle mold completePhoto: test fitting 1708 cloth on on moldPhoto: wetted out cloth curing atop mold.Photo: Cured conduit freed easily from moldPhoto: marking out location and length of conduit.Photo: Marking out areas along the interior of he hull the recieve tabbing.  Next step is to use the grinder to expose the fiberglass hullPhoto: Solid fiberglass of hull exposed to allow proper tabbing of new bulkhead.Photo: conduit epoxied and tabbing into place.Photo: Aft panel of the new ice box is in place.  Ready to begin build out of new bulkhead and cockpit locker cabinetry.Photo: Reflectix insulation applied to aft wall.Photo: Nearly finished insulating aft wall of ice box.Photo: test fitting 1/8" Luan Plywood template of new bulkhead.Photo: tracing out template for bulkhead on marine grade 1/2" plywood.Photo: 1/2" Marine Plywood to be used for new bulkheadPhoto: new bulkhead set in place with epoxy along hull and screws along side and top.Photo: looking thru cockpit locker at new bulkhead assemblyPhoto: 1708 coth cut for tabbing on new cockpit locker bulkheadPhoto: test fitting coth sections on new cockpit locker bulkheadPhoto: Anne preparing to add tabbing to new bulkhead in cockpit locker aft of ice boxPhoto: ready to cut out the new ice box dividerPhoto: 2 to 3 layers of fresh tabbing on the new bulkhead in the cockpit lockerPhoto: Fresh paint on forward bulkhead and lower section of cockpit locker.The ice box insulation pushed the new bulkhead is 5" further aft than the original.Photo: painting completed in ice box.Photo: test fitting plywood template of vertical ice box dividerPhoto: transferring template to plexiglassPhoto: Photo: I plan to add two additional inches of insulation to the underside of the lids.  Using the original lids as templated for additional insulation.Photo: Fitting new lid insulationPhoto: Ice box lid on left is original construction.  I used a table saw to square up the interior wood flange on the right lidPhoto: Designing modifications to ice box lidsPhoto: The plywood face on which the lid hinge was attached was in poor condition with the screw holes  failing.I removed approx 3/16" on both lids from the  plywood face on which the hinge mounts.  I then epoxied a new piece of teak along the face.To provide a good surface for using the flush cut bit on the router to clean up the edge of new trim on the ice box lids I set up jig on work bench behind PilgrimPhoto: Using a router and flush trim bit  to remove excess teak off the ice box lidsPhoto: beforePhoto: afterPhoto: Next I altered the jig to allow for removing excess teak from the vertical face of the trim.Photo: Once I achieved a snug fit with the two lids.  I installed a new piano hinge on the port (larger lid).Photo: Installing the hinge on the smaller (starboard) lid.By Inserting a couple spare sections of identical piano hinge between the two lids I got the correct spacing to allow for the spline of the hinge.Photo: Test fitting the two lids with the newly installed hinge.Photo: Lid open with paneling cut away.Photo: cut away portion of paneling over port lid of ice box to allow for better accessPhoto: installing pull on port side of ice box lidPhoto: new pull installed on port side of ice box lidPhoto: Photo: