95 Photos - Oct 14, 2014
Photo: Starting point on Pilgrim's RudderPhoto: Using 1/8" plywood and hot glue to crate a template for the rudder additionPhoto: the upper section of the forward arc of the rudder addition is defined by the curve of the hull with the rudder straightPhoto: Looking into the locker below Pilgrim's helm seat.  Prior to beginning any work in the areaPhoto: due to the curvature of the hull the lower forward section of the rudder addition is defined when the rudder is turned approx 25 degressPhoto: transffering the original mock up to a piece of 1/8" plywoodPhoto: close up of rudder addition with rudder centeredPhoto: close up of rudder addition with rudder turned approx. 25 degrees to starboardPhoto: test fitting the rudder addition with the rudder centeredPhoto: Debating size of addition to rudder.  Red area represents possible increase in area over existing template.Photo: Creating larger template off of initial templatePhoto: two rudder modification templated juxtaposedPhoto: Larger tempalte in line with keel and viewed from starboardPhoto: top of larger template centered on keel and viewed from starboardPhoto: top of larger template turned to port and viewed from starboardPhoto: larger template turned to port and viewed from starboardPhoto: 1/4" FRP to be used as a core for the rudder modification (right).  Luan template for modification (left).Photo: Two sections of 1/4" FRP core joined together with light weight mat.Photo: Pilgrim's bronze rudder gudgeon and three mounting screwsPhoto: interior face of Pilgrim's rudder gudgeonPhoto: Looking into the locker below Pilgrim's helm seat.  Prior to beginning any work in the areaPhoto: Pilgrim's Edson D-21 aluminum quadrantPhoto: Profile of the two halves of Edson D-21 quadrantPhoto: Underside of the Edson D-21 quardantPhoto: Close up of rudder stock bore and keyPhoto: Locker below helm seat with steering quadrant removed.  Note repair on port (right) support leg.  I'm guessing that a grounding or heavy weather pushed the quadrant stop into the support.Photo: Rudder post & packing gland.  Unable to find any wrench to fit packing nut and fit in area.  Based on chips missing and gouges cut into packing nut I'm guessing previous owners used a hammer and cold chisel to  tighten nut.Photo: Creating a plywood template for rudder packing nut wrenchPhoto: transffering initial wench template to new piece of 1/8" plywoodPhoto: test fitting template to be used by manchine shop to fabricate a M382 rudder packing gland wrenchPhoto: Photo: Test fitting custom wrench for rudder shaft packing glandPhoto: The rudder packing nut removed. Happiness is having the right tools for the job.Photo: Using picks and small, flat screw driver to excavate decayed flax packing out of the packing nut.Photo: Pilgrim's packing nut after a visit with bench grinder's wire wheel. The deep gouges along the top are from past owner using a hammer and cold chisel to tighten the nut.  Despite the damage, I believe the packing nut is serviceable.Photo: Tied the rudder to the boat so it will elevate and allow me to kick ot the support blocks as the boat is lifted.Photo: Rudder removed and resting on pallet alongside the engine.Photo: aft side of the lower skeg with gudgeon and rudder removedPhoto: Port side of rudder blocked out and ready to begin repairs & modifications.Photo: Starboard side of rudder blocked out and ready to begin repairs & modificationsPhoto: Damage along aft, lower edge of rudder appears to be from grounding or collisionPhoto: cut out for gudgeon on leading edge of rudderPhoto: Crack along forward edge above gudgeonPhoto: Crack on forward edge just below gudeonPhoto: Tempate representing the shape of the leading edge of the rudder.Photo: forward, rudder edge below gudgeon ground down to core material and strutural mat to repair crack in area.Photo: forward, rudder edge above gudgeon ground down to core material and strutural mat to repair crack in area.Photo: Area around gudgeon ground down for repairs.Photo: Two layers of 1708 coth applied along forward edge above and below the rudder gudgeon cut out.Photo: grinding out damaged areas on port side aft, lower rudderPhoto: previous damage likely due to past grounding discovered along lower, aft edge of rudder.Photo: Material removal complete.  Time to begin rebuilding the rudder.Photo: laying out the area to recieve new 1708 clothPhoto: Creative clamping required to hold FRP core in position while adding the intial round of epoxy & tabbingPhoto: Stacking wood wedges to center the FRP core on the original rudderPhoto: The initial round of epoxy and light weight cloth is intended fill voids between the FRP core and the original rudder and fix the position of the FRP core on the original rudder in preparation for the next round heavy, structual cloth.Photo: Cutting 1708 cloth in preparation for round two of laying up the rudder modifications.Photo: The tools for laying out and cutting sections of  fiberglass cloth:  Tape measure, razor knife, marker, long straight edge, and framing square.Photo: Anne wetting out cloth for round two of laying up the rudder modifications.Photo: Filler then five layers of 1708 cloth applied to repair the damage to the aft, lower port of the rudder.Photo: Lower port, aft repair after grinding down second round cloth.Photo: Upper port rudder after grinding down round two of cloth.Photo: Grinding down cloth added during round two.Photo: cutting out sections of 1-1/2" structual foam for building up upper section of rudder.Photo: fitting structual foam blocks to fill upper section of rudder modifications.Photo: Fitting aft section of 3/4" thick foamPhoto: Strutural foam clamped to top of rudder while epoxy cures.Photo: shaping foam using a 8 inch disc grinderPhoto: Foam strips for filling on rudder modifications laid out for installtionPhoto: Thickened epoxy applied with notched spreaderPhoto: starboard foam strips applied.Photo: Starboard side outer layer 1708 cloth on rudder modificationsPhoto: Port side outer layer of 1708 cloth on rudder modificationsPhoto: upper, port side rudder modifications with outer layer of 1708 cloth applied Photo: upper port side outer layer 1708 sandedPhoto: port side outer layer 1708 cloth sanded downPhoto: starboard side upper layer 1708 cloth sanded Photo: Adding additional light cloth to upper rudder modificationPhoto: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: applying barrier coating to finished rudder modificationsPhoto: epoxy additive for filling pitting in stainless steel rudder stockPhoto: using graphite thickened epoxy to fill pitting in rudder stockPhoto: Rudder repairs and modifications completePhoto: rudder repairs and modifications completePhoto: graphite thickened epoxy filler in rudder stock pitting after sanding down with 600 grit