29 Photos - Apr 24, 2015
Photo: Newseum's gigantic HD screen in the Great Hall of News, awaiting the start of NASA's televised Press Conference.Photo: NASA Administrator Charles Bolden reviews his remarks prior to the start of the Hubble 25th Anniversary Image Unveiling press conference at the Newseum.Photo: Display items at NASA's televised press conference held at the Newseum on April 23, 2015.Photo: NASA Social participants await the start of the Hubble 25th Anniversary Image Unveiling press conference.Photo: NASA Administrator Charles Bolden addresses attendees of the Hubble 25th Anniversary Image Unveiling.Photo: NASA Astronaut John Grunsfeld, who flew service missions to the Hubble Space Telescope, addresses attendees of the Hubble 25th Anniversary Image Unveiling at the Newseum.Photo: Jennifer Wiseman, Senior Project Scientist for the Hubble Space Telescope, addresses attendees of the NASA televised press conference.Photo: NASA Administrator Charles Bolden fields questions following the Official Hubble 25th Anniversary Image Unveiling held at the Newseum in downtown Washington, DC.Photo: Dr. Jennifer Wiseman visited with me and other NASA Social participants following the Hubble 25th Anniversary Image Unveiling.Photo: Hanging out in a room overlooking the High Bay Clean Room during NASA's #Hubble25 Social.Photo: Mirrors for the James Webb Space Telescope are stored in metal canisters along a terrace in NASA Goddard's High Bay Clean Room.Photo: James Webb Space Telescope components are visible in the High Bay Clean Room at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.Photo: NASA Goddard's High-Capacity Centrifuge can subject space equipment to up to 30 Gs.Photo: Ed Packard, Associate Head for the Environmental Test Engineering and Integration Branch, discusses tests done to make sure spacecraft can withstand the stress of launch.Photo: The Space Environment Simulator has enabled NASA to test components of the James Webb Space Telescope in the high vacuum and extreme cold it will experience after launch.Photo: The back end of a decommissioned weather satellite sits in the Satellite Servicing Capabilities Office at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. To the right are prototype robotic controllers that may assist in future refueling missions.Photo: Three generations of space tools, showing a trend from big and heavy to small and light. The center tool was used to repair Hubble Space Telescope.Photo: Hubble Space Telescope was originally launched with three of these reel-to-reel Engineering and Science Tape Recorders. During subsequent servicing missions, two were replaced by Solid State Recorders.Photo: NASA Social attendees handle Hubble Space Telescope components returned to Earth after a servicing mission.Photo: Following the NASA Social held at Goddard Space Flight Center, I took a stroll on the Mall in Washington DC.Photo: The Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center is part of the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, and houses the Space Shuttle Discovery among many famous aerospace vehicles.Photo: Air France's Concorde, supersonic commercial airliner, is on display at the National Air and Space Museum facility in Chantilly, VA.Photo: The Canadarm, built by the Canadian Space Agency, rests next to Discovery.Photo: The Space Shuttle Discovery's crew compartment and nose cap.Photo: Heat shield tiles affixed to the belly of the Space Shuttle Discovery.Photo: This image includes a half century of space vehicles from the Gemini and Apollo space programs all the way to more recent vehicles like Orbital Science's Pegasus, seen at right.Photo: The Canadarm, a space crane, rests next to the Space Shuttle Discovery.Photo: The belly of Space Shuttle DiscoveryPhoto: NASA's Space Shuttle Discovery on display in Chantilly, VA.