Photo: 25. Transonic shock buffet on large transport aircraft.

Dr Fulvio Sartor, University of Liverpool School of Engineering.

Transonic flow field around a wing-body configuration representative of a large transport aircraft at flight conditions. The image is a snapshot of an unsteady computational fluid dynamics simulation run on ARCHER.
The aircraft surface is coloured by the air pressure. The slices on the wings indicate the velocity field in the supersonic zone of the flow. The slices in the wake represent the turbulent air generated by the separated flow due to the shock wave interacting with the boundary layer. Streamlines coloured by the velocity magnitude give an idea of the flow direction around the aircraft.
Photo: 26. Streamlines illustrating the temperature distribution and spontaneous emergence of counter-rotating vortices within the flow of an irregular 3D liquid droplet undergoing phase change.

Dr Pedro J. Sáenz,  University of Edinburgh Institute for Materials and Processes.

This image illustrates the flow and temperature distribution within an evaporating liquid droplet with irregular contact area.  For the first time, deformed drops have been simulated in three-dimensions, investigation which has elucidated the spontaneous emergence of previously-unknown vortices playing an essential role on the drop’s flow and heat transfer mechanism. Understanding the dynamics of an evaporating droplet is a fundamental problem with a broad range of application, such as the development of new techniques for early diagnosis of several life-threatening diseases based on the pattern formation from drying drops of blood. The data depicted in the figure is the result of seven coupled nonlinear equations simultaneously solved at more than 8 million points, herculean task which would have required years to complete without ARCHER.
Photo: * * *  COMPETITION WINNING ENTRY  * * *

27. Streamlines illustrating the temperature distribution and emergence of azimuthal currents within the flow of an irregular 3D liquid droplet undergoing phase change.

Dr Pedro J. Sáenz,  University of Edinburgh Institute for Materials and Processes.

This image illustrates the flow and temperature distribution within an evaporating liquid droplet with elliptical contact area.  For the first time, deformed drops have been simulated in three-dimensions, investigation which has elucidated the spontaneous emergence of previously-unknown azimuthal currents playing an essential role on the drop’s flow and heat transfer mechanism. Understanding the dynamics of an evaporating droplet is a fundamental problem with a broad range of application, such as the development of new techniques for early diagnosis of several life-threatening diseases based on the pattern formation from drying drops of blood. The data depicted in the figure is the result of seven coupled nonlinear equations simultaneously solved at more than 8 million points, herculean task which would have required years to complete without ARCHER.
Photo: 28. Exploring the Activation Mechanisms of an Insect Neuroreceptor.

Mr Federico Comitani, King's College London, Department of Physics.

Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) are important neuroreceptors that mediate the fast communication between neurons by allowing ions to pass across the cell membrane in response to the binding of a small molecule, the neurotransmitter. Their malfunction is linked to serious neuronal disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and they are major drug target; in insects they are involved in insecticide resistance. Using a novel computational technique for accelerating rare events, “funnel metadynamics”, we simulated binding and unbinding events of the neurotransmitter GABA to the fruit fly RDL receptor: the part of this system containing the binding site is shown in blue. The orange funnel represents a restraining potential that restricts the exploration of GABA in the solvent outside the protein, allowing for accurate estimations of the energy of binding. Sequential snapshots  of GABA, coloured from red to violet, suggest a possible unbinding path. The image was generated with VMD v1.9.2.
Photo: 29. Primary hairpin vortex structure in a turbulent-to-turbulent transition of flow in a channel with a 3-D roughness.

Dr Mehdi Seddighi, University of Sheffield Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Unsteady flows, in which the bulk velocity of a wall-bounded flow or the free-stream velocity of a boundary-layer flow vary with time, are encountered in many engineering applications. DNS has been used to investigate the transient behaviour of turbulence following a rapid flow acceleration from an initially turbulent flow in a channel with a smooth top wall and a roughened bottom wall made of close-packed pyramids. The image shows the shape of the head-up hairpin structures (in red colour) observed during the early transient stages which is similar to that of the primary hairpin structures observed for steady smooth wall flow, contrasting with the U-shape head-down vortices observed for steady fully-rough channel flows with similar pyramid roughness. The vortex is visualised using Q-criterion. The blue structures exhibit the iso-surface of the pressure.
Loading...
ARCHER High Performance Computing Service
Public
* * * COMPETITION WINNING ENTRY * * *

27. Streamlines illustrating the temperature distribution and emergence of azimuthal currents within the flow of an irregular 3D liquid droplet undergoing phase change.

Dr Pedro J. Sáenz, University of Edinburgh Institute for Materials and Processes.

This image illustrates the flow and temperature distribution within an evaporating liquid droplet with elliptical contact area. For the first time, deformed drops have been simulated in three-dimensions, investigation which has elucidated the spontaneous emergence of previously-unknown azimuthal currents playing an essential role on the drop’s flow and heat transfer mechanism. Understanding the dynamics of an evaporating droplet is a fundamental problem with a broad range of application, such as the development of new techniques for early diagnosis of several life-threatening diseases based on the pattern formation from drying drops of blood. The data depicted in the figure is the result of seven coupled nonlinear equations simultaneously solved at more than 8 million points, herculean task which would have required years to complete without ARCHER.
+1