124 Photos - Feb 12, 2012
Photo: Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman
Photo: Lois Blumenthal, June 2007.
University College of the Cayman Islands hall has white roof (mid-right).
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=grand+cayman&hl=en&ll=19.280978,-81.381569&spn=0.006613,0.009602&hnear=Grand+Cayman&t=h&vpsrc=6&z=17Photo: Geological map of Grand Cayman showing the Cayman Formation, 
including Ironwood Forest (SW) and Hell (NW).
The Cayman Formation is sharp, pinnacled dolostone rock, pitted and very rugged (phytokarst)Photo: Geologic features of Grand Cayman. Cayman Formation (on the western peninsula it occurs only in Hell in West Bay, and the Ironwood Forest, south of George Town), Ironshore Formation, Pedro Castle Formation (Pedro St. James area only) and Sangamon Terrace (East End only).
Islands from the Sea, Geologic Stories of Cayman by Murray A. Roed, p.53.Photo: Islands from the Sea - Geological Stories of Cayman by Murray A. Roed, 2006 (p.65).
Diagrammatic cross-section from Hell to the centre of George Town (Ironwood Forest area) on Grand Cayman shows the Pedro Castle Formation, the overlying Ironshore Formation, and the underlying Cayman Formation.
http://www.sandhillbooks.com/cgi-bin/sandhillbooks/00028.htmlPhoto: Map of Ironwood Forest (before Dec.2002), 
showing Crown Property, wetlands and proposed road.
Current Google map of Ironwood Forest, SE of George Town, Grand Cayman:
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=grand+cayman&hl=en&ll=19.280978,-81.381569&spn=0.006613,0.009602&hnear=Grand+Cayman&t=h&vpsrc=6&z=17
Community College is now University College of the Cayman IslandsPhoto: Fresh water and salt water plants - Reading the Landscape. 
The fresh water lens sits on top of the heavier salt water.
The plants will tell you where the water is fresh and where it is salty/brackish. 
http://geography.about.com/library/misc/ucghyben.htmPhoto: PHYTOKARST is pinnacle rock of the Cayman Formation dolostone (limestone with magnesium).
Roots of trees and shrubs penetrate through the rocks to get water. The roots secrete acids.
Microbes bore their way into dolostone to produce the sharp, grey-black weathered surface of the jagged pinnacles which contrasts with the white colour of the unaltered host rocks.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, April 1, 2008.Photo: Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, is a living museum. 
Trees of cultural significance, used in traditional house construction and 
ship-building are found in the forest.
Ann Stafford, Jan.24, 2007Photo: Widespread Rockcap Fern - Pecluma dispersa, syn. Polypodium dispersum, Family: POLYPDIACEAE,
growing on rotted branch, lying on limestone rock; Near Threatened. 
http://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=504152
Photo: Ann Stafford, Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, March 25, 2008.
Flora of the Cayman Islands by George R. Proctor 2012, p.50 Fig.10.
http://www.regionalconservation.org/ircs/database/plants/PlantPage.asp?TXCODE=Pecldisp
http://efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=233500867
Usually on limestone outcrops, occasionally epiphytic in hammocks, Florida; Mexico; West Indies; Central America; South America to s Brazil.Photo: 1971 Cayman Islands Ghost Orchid - Dendrophylax fawcettii 
(Critically Endangered Grand Cayman endemic)
on 1/4 cent (one fourth of one cent) stamp. Release date: April 7, 1971.Photo: 1985 Cayman Islands Ghost Orchid - Dendrophylax fawcettii (Critically Endangered Grand Cayman endemic)
on 50 cent stamp. Release date: March 13.Photo: Ghost Orchid - Dendrophylax fawcettii - Grand Cayman endemic, was named after William Fawcett,
who made the earliest known Cayman Islands plant collection in 1888.
It was also collected during the 1938 Oxford University Biological Expedition to the Cayman Islands.
Flora of the Cayman Islands by George R. Proctor, 2012, p.208.Photo: Ghost Orchids - Dendrophylax fawcettii growing at the base of a Wild fig tree - Ficus aurea.
Photo: Ann Stafford April 20, 2003
http://www.doe.ky/nbap/?page_id=390Photo: Cayman Islands Ghost Orchid showing buds. Dendrophylax fawcettii - 
Critically Endangered Grand Cayman endemic, 
grows on trees or on rocks and can propagate vegetatively. 
When the trees lost their leaves during Hurricane Ivan in Sept. 2004, 
orchids growing on the rocks could not survive the lack of shade.
  P. Ann van B. Stafford, Mar. 28, 2004Photo: Ghost Orchids – Dendrophylax fawcettii - Critically Endangered Grand Cayman endemic, grow on trees or on rocks and can propagate vegetatively. They have no pseudobulbs or leaves and photosynthesize through their roots. Ann Stafford, Aug. 8, 2007
Cayman Islands Ghost Orchid listed in 100 Most Threatened Species
http://www.ieyenews.com/2012/09/cayman-islands-ghost-orchid-listed-in-100-most-threatened-species/Photo: Picklewood (Velvetseed) - Guettarda elliptica, Family: RUBIACEAE, Endangered.
OPPOSITE leaves (or sometimes in whorls of 3), shrub or small tree, 
with Grand Cayman's endemic Ghost Orchid - Dendrophylax fawcettii, Critically Endangered, growing on it.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, Feb. 16, 2005, (5 months after Hurricane Ivan hit Grand Cayman).
Proctor's FLORA of the CAYMAN ISLANDS 2012, p.626, Plate 62 and p.208,Fig.75, Plate10.Photo: Ghost Orchid - Dendrophylax fawcettii, showing flowers with ghostly face and long spur,
Critically Endangered Grand Cayman endemic. 
photo: P. Ann van B. Stafford, April 3, 2008
Cayman Islands Ghost Orchid Dendrophylax fawcettii listed in 100 Most Threatened Species
http://www.scribd.com/doc/105589268/Priceless-or-Worthless-ReportPhoto: Ghost Orchid - Dendrophylax fawcettii, showing flower with long spur, 
dead unpollinated flower and pollinated flower, Critically Endangered Grand Cayman endemic. 
The Giant Sphinx Moth - Cocytius antaeus, is the probable pollinator
 because it can reach the nectar at the end of the Ghost Orchid flower's long spur.
Ghost Orchids also reproduce vegetatively. 
July 12, 2009 P. Ann van B. StaffordPhoto: Laura van B. Stafford photographing Ghost Orchids - Dendrophylax fawcettii. 
July 14, 2009Photo: Ghost Orchids, Dendrophylax fawcettii, painted by Laura van B. Stafford, 2009,
Critically Endangered Grand Cayman endemic.
The picture shows flowers with long spur,
dead unpollinated flower and pollinated flower, forming a rare fruit.
The Giant Sphinx Moth - Cocytius antaeus, is the probable pollinator
because it can reach the nectar at the end of the Ghost Orchid flower's long spur.
Florida Ghost Orchid (Dendrophylax lindenii) is visited by a Giant Sphinx Moth (Cocytius antaeus)
in south Florida’s Big Cypress National Preserve – watch the video 
www.youtube.com/watch?v=ca--GgEe2ZgPhoto: West Indian Cedar - Cedrela odorata, Critically Endangered, Family: MELIACEAE and 
(at left) Old George – Hohenbergia caymanensis, Critically Endangered Grand Cayman endemic, Family: BROMELIACEAE. 
Ironwood Forest, photo: Ann Stafford, Nov.18, 2002Photo: 2002 Dr. George R. Proctor (3rd. from right), author of the FLORA of the CAYMAN ISLANDS, with group, in the Ironwood Forest, 
behind the University College of the Cayman Islands (formerly called the Community College of the Cayman Islands)
Nov. 13, 2002Photo: Ironwood Forest Nov.18, 2002Photo: 2002 Ridge cleared for housing, Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, 
(July St, Windsor Park) Dec. 22, 2002
http://www.caymannewsservice.com/science-and-nature/2012/09/11/orchid-100-critical-speciesPhoto: 2002 Ridge cleared for housing, Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman,
(July St, Windsor Park) Dec. 22, 2002Photo: Old George – Hohenbergia caymanensis, Critically Endangered Grand Cayman endemic, Family: BROMELIACEAE 
growing on pinnacle rock. It also grows on trees. 
Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, photo: Ann Stafford Jan. 17, 2003.Photo: Old George – Hohenbergia caymanensis, Critically Endangered Grand Cayman endemic Family: BROMELIACEAE and
the very common strangling shrub/small tree Balsam - Clusia flava, that has dangling aerial roots, Family: CLUSIACEAE 
wrapped around the trunk of another tree. 
Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, photo: Ann Stafford Jan. 17, 2003.Photo: Ironwood Forest explorers Jan. 24, 2003Photo: 2003 Ironwood Forest walkers, Grand Cayman, Feb.2, 2003Photo: 2003 March: BEES attacked a bulldozer driver, who was cutting a trail. 
He jumped off and the rampaging, driverless bulldozer made a bee-line for the College, where it crashed
into the air-conditioners by the hall, (Community College, now University College of the Cayman Islands).
There was a very loud explosion sound when the bulldozer hit and finally came to a stop.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Mar. 25, 2003Photo: 2003 March: track of runaway driverless bulldozer. 
It crashed into the air-conditioners by the Community College of the Cayman Islands hall straight ahead,
after the driver was attacked by bees and jumped off the bulldozer.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Mar. 25, 2003.Photo: 2003 March Runaway driverless bulldozer crashes into air-conditioning units by the Community College of the Cayman Islands multi-purpose hall, 
after the driver was attacked by bees and jumped off the bulldozer.
Caymanian Compass March 26, 2003Photo: 2003 March: Runaway driverless bulldozer crashed into air-conditioning units by the Community College of the Cayman Islands hall,
after the driver was attacked by bees and jumped off the bulldozer.
There was a very loud explosion sound when the bulldozer hit and finally came to a stop.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Mar. 25, 2003.Photo: 2003 Entrance to the very rocky forest behind the College hall
April 25, 2003Photo: 2003 Entrance to the very rocky forest behind the College hall
April 25, 2003Photo: 2003 Entrance to the swamp trail behind the College (library is to the right)  
March 28, 2003Photo: Phytokarst - pinnacle rock, the very rocky swamp trail, Ironwood Forest.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Grand Cayman, April 2003.
Hell in West Bay and the Ironwood Forest are both CAYMAN FORMATION dolostone rock.
http://gsabulletin.gsapubs.org/content/84/7/2351Photo: 2003 on the Ironwood Forest Swamp 'Trail' - pinnacle rock phytokarst: Satu Suominen Troyer, Matti Troyer, Lois Blumenthal, Carla Reid.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Grand Cayman, May 6, 2003Photo: Split on the swamp 'trail', Ironwood Forest.
PHYTOKARST is pinnacle rock of the Cayman Formation dolostone (limestone with magnesium).
Roots of trees and shrubs penetrate through the rocks to get water. The roots secrete acids.
Microbes bore their way into dolostone to produce the sharp, grey-black weathered surface of the jagged pinnacles which contrasts with the white colour of the unaltered host rocks.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Grand Cayman, 2003Photo: swamp at end of the trailPhoto: end of the swamp trail, 
Endangered Bitter Plum tree - Picrodendron baccatum EUPHORBIACEAE on left.
Cayman Islands, Bahamas, Cuba, Hispaniola, Jamaica and the Swan Islands.Photo: end of the swamp trail behind the University College of the Cayman Islands.Photo: 2003 Bitter Plum tree - Picrodendron baccatum, EUPHORBIACEAE, Endangered,
at the edge of the swamp Mar.28, 2003.
Cayman Islands, Bahamas, Cuba, Hispaniola, Jamaica and the Swan Islands.Photo: 2003 Rotten tree trunk in Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, April 4, 2003Photo: 2003 Watching and waiting in the very rocky Ironwood Forest at night, 
to see if any Giant Sphinx moths, probable pollinators, 
visit the fragrant Ghost Orchid flowers - Dendrophylax fawcettii,  
 (we didn't see any). May 1, 2003Photo: 2003 Ghost Orchids - Dendrophylax fawcettii, fragrant at night, grow on rocks or trees in the Ironwood Forest.
The Giant Sphinx moth is the probable pollinator, 
as it has a proboscis long enough to reach the nectar at the end of the long spur.
May 1, 2003Photo: 2003 Survey trail from the west end of the proposed road (Walkers Rd, by Wendy's),
May 8, 2003Photo: 2003 The survey trail for the proposed road 
(from Walkers Rd. south of Coemer Drive) stopped here.
May 9, 2003
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=grand+cayman&hl=en&ll=19.280978,-81.381569&spn=0.006613,0.009602&hnear=Grand+Cayman&t=h&vpsrc=6&z=17Photo: 2003 Survey trail from Outpost Road, Windsor Park (eastern approach) 
stopped at the swamp,
May 25, 2003Photo: 2003 Survey trail from Outpost Road, Windsor Park stopped at the swamp. Liguinea Circle is to the left. 
Fallen endemic Hohenbergia caymanensis (Old George) in centre,
May 25, 2003Photo: 2003 Survey trail for road through the forest from Outpost Road stopped at the swamp, 
(looking westwards towards Walkers Rd).
May 25, 2003Photo: Picklewood - Guettarda elliptica, Endangered, Family: RUBIACEAE, showing mottled bark. 
Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, photo: Ann Stafford July 16, 2003Photo: Cionosicyos pomiformis - Duppy Pumpkin, Wild Pumpkin, CUCURBITACEAE.
Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, July 13, 2003
Range: Grand Cayman and Jamaica only
Photo: P. Ann van B. Stafford.
Flora of the Cayman Islands by George R. Proctor, 2012, p.330 Pl.22.
Flowering Plants of Jamaica by C. D. Adams 1972, p.503.Photo: Duppy Pumpkin, Wild Pumpkin - Cionosicyos pomiformis, CUCURBITACEAE.
Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, July 14, 2003
Range: Grand Cayman and Jamaica only
Photo: P. Ann van B. Stafford.
Flora of the Cayman Islands by George R. Proctor, 2012, p.330 Pl.22.
Flowering Plants of Jamaica by C. D. Adams 1972, p.503.Photo: Cionosicyos pomiformis - Duppy Pumpkin, Wild Pumpkin, CUCURBITACEAE.
Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, Feb.22, 2004
At last we find leaves to go with the fruits on this high climbing vine.
Range: Grand Cayman and Jamaica onlyPhoto: 2004 Ironwood Forest walkers, Grand Cayman, March 7, 2004Photo: West Indian Cedar - Cedrela odorata, Critically Endangered, Family: MELIACEAE, 
with bromeliads. Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, March 28, 2004Photo: Candlewood  / Torchwood - Amyris elemifera, Endangered, Citrus Family: RUTACEAE. Compound leaf with 3 leaflets, very aromatic when crushed. Resinous Candlewood burns even when still green and was used for making torches and  kindling for lighting the  Lime Kiln woods burn coral rocks to make daub for wattle and daub houses.
 It is one of the larval food plants of the Cayman Swallowtail, a Grand Cayman endemic butterfly.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Mar.4, 2012Photo: Ironwood Forest clamberers negotiating the pinnacle rock
 (behind the University College of the Cayman Islands).
April 23, 2004Photo: Cow Tongue, Long Strap Fern - Campyloneurum phyllitidis (= Polypodium phyllitidis)  
and Resurection Fern - Polypodium polypodioides, Family: POLYPODIACEAE, both Near Threatened. 
Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, photo: Ann Stafford, May 23, 2004Photo: 2004 Ironwood Forest walkers, 
3 months before Hurricane Ivan, June 5, 2004Photo: 2004 Ironwood Forest walkers, 
3 months before Hurricane Ivan. 
Photo: Denise Bodden June 5, 2004Photo: 2004 Ironwood Forest, behind the University College of the Cayman Islands hall, a few days after Hurricane Ivan hit.
The trees and shrubs, including the Critically Endangered in this self-sustainable forest, 
lost their leaves and some branches, but they recovered.
Sept.19, 2004Photo: 2004 Ironwood Forest a few days after Hurricane Ivan hit.
University College of the Cayman Islands was used as a hurricane shelter.
The trees and shrubs, including the Critically Endangered in this self-sustainable forest, 
lost their leaves and some branches, but they recovered.
Sept.19, 2004Photo: Old George – Hohenbergia caymanensis, BROMELIACEAE, a Critically Endangered Grand Cayman endemic giant bromeliad,
growing on pinnacle Dolostone limestone. 
Ann Stafford Sept. 11, 2005.
It grows on rocks and also on tree trunks and is found in abundance in the Ironwood Forest,
behind the University College of the Cayman Islands.
http://www.doe.ky/nbap/?page_id=371Photo: Ironwood Forest, a living museum, 
SE of George Town, Grand Cayman, 
behind the University College of the Cayman Islands.Photo: Ironwood Forest wetland from Dolostone limestone ridge. 
Ironwood trees and Hohenbergia - a giant Bromeliad, both Cayman endemics, Sept. 11, 2005.Photo: Old George - Hohenbergia caymanensis, BROMELIACEAE, Critically Endangered Grand Cayman endemic, 
only occurs naturally in a small area of rocky woodland SE of George Town. 
It grows on rocks and also on tree trunks and is found in abundance in the Ironwood Forest, 
behind the University College of the Cayman Islands.
http://www.doe.ky/nbap/?page_id=371Photo: Mushrooms on dead Red Birch - Bursera simaruba in Ironwood Forest,
one year after Hurricane Ivan hit Grand Cayman.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Oct. 9, 2005.Photo: 2006 Orchid rescue from already felled trees, between Newport Avenue and Windsor Park, Feb. 1, 2006Photo: Ironwood - Chionanthus caymanensis, Endangered Cayman Islands endemic tree, 
Family: OLEACEAE, showing the trunk and leaves. 
Ironwood is the predominant tree in the Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman. 
Photo: Ann Stafford June 4, 2006
FLORA of the CAYMAN ISLANDS by George R. Proctor, p.595, Fig.221, Pl.58Photo: 2006 Young Fustic tree - Maclura tinctoria, Family: MORACEAE, Critically Endangered,
in the Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Nov. 13, 2006.
Flora of the Cayman Islands, Proctor 2012 p.241, Fig.84.Photo: Wild Fig - Ficus citrifolia, MORACEAE, Endangered, at the edge of the wetland.
Florida, West Indies and parts of Central America.
Ann Stafford Aug. 8, 2007Photo: Large wetland on Crown land, NE of University College of the Cayman Islands.
Swamp Fern, Giant Leather Fern - Acrostichum danaeifolium, POLYPODIACEAE 
Aug. 8, 2007Photo: Swamp Fern, Giant Leather Fern - Acrostichum danaeifolium, POLYPODIACEAE, 
fertile fronds with sporangia on all the pinnae. 
Data deficient suspected to be at risk. Photo: Ann Stafford, Aug. 8, 2007. 
Western Hemisphere tropics, in same habitats as Mangrove Fern - Acrostichum aureum, but much less common.
Fertile fronds of the very common A. aureum bear sporangia on the upper pinnae only.
http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu/Hort/GardenPubsAZ/Giant_Leather_fern_Acrostichum_danaeifolum.pdfPhoto: Large wetland on Crown land, NE of University College of the Cayman Islands,
forest ridge in the background.
Aug. 8, 2007Photo: 2008 Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman
Aerial photo: Lois Blumenthal Jan.27, 2008
The two tracks that were cleared, both from 
Walkers Road to the west and 
Outpost Road to the east (which ran into a wetland), can clearly be seen.
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=grand+cayman&hl=en&ll=19.280978,-81.381569&spn=0.006613,0.009602&hnear=Grand+Cayman&t=h&vpsrc=6&z=17Photo: Ironwood Forest, SE of George Town, Grand Cayman,
a list of some of the species growing there.Photo: Bees in the rock - Cayman Formation Dolostone (phytokarst), Ironwood Forest, Mar. 25, 2008Photo: Plants on the pinnacle rocks of Cayman Formation Dolostone (phytokarst): 
Old George - Hohenbergia caymanensis (Critically Endangered Grand Cayman endemic) and 
Chascotheca neopeltandra (Grand Cayman, Cuba and Hispaniola)
April 1, 2008Photo: Ghost Orchids - Dendrophylax fawcettii and Old George - Hohenbergia caymanensis,
two Critically Endangered Grand Cayman endemics.
Both grow on the rocks - Cayman Formation Dolostone (phytokarst) and on trees. 
Water trapped in the leaves of the giant Bromeliads provides moisture for the leafless Ghost Orchids.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, March 13, 2008.Photo: Ghost Orchids - Dendrophylax fawcettii and Old George, 
two Grand Cayman endemics,
March 25, 2008
https://sites.google.com/site/kristandgodbeer/ironwood-forestPhoto: Wild Fig - Ficus aurea and fallen tree
March 25, 2008Photo: Shake Hand Tree, Xylosma bahamense, dioecious, Endangered, Family: SALICACEAE.
Grand Cayman and northern Bahamas only.
Shake Hand trees have sharp spines on the trunk as well as the branches.
 P. Ann van B. Stafford, Grand Cayman, Nov. 23, 2006Photo: University College of the Cayman Islands students in the Ironwood Forest, 
immediately behind the College, Grand Cayman.
Photo: Ann Stafford, May 26, 2009Photo: Lilian Hayball, Ironwood Forest, behind University College of the Cayman Islands, Grand Cayman.
Photo: Ann Stafford, May 26, 2009Photo: 2009 Green Travel Guides TV videoing Cayman Islands Ghost Orchid - Dendrophylax fawcettii,
in bloom, June 3, 2009Photo: 2009 United Kingdom Overseas Territories Conservation Forum (UKOTCF) in Cayman for conference, June 5, 2009.
http://www.ukotcf.org/confs/grandCayman2009.htmPhoto: 2009 The Cayman Islands hosted an international environmental conference from 30th May to 5th June 2009, 
with a focus on UK Overseas Territories, Crown Dependencies and other small islands.
http://www.ukotcf.org/confs/grandCayman2009.htmPhoto: 2009 Ironwood Forest hikers, Rotary Central, Grand Cayman Aug. 8, 2009.
Following the talk by Lois Blumenthal on the Ironwood Forest, members of the club were invited to visit the site 
with a view to establishing how Rotary Central could become involved in this important environmental project. Pictured here are some that ventured forth! 
http://portal.clubrunner.ca/1533/Stories/ironwood-forestPhoto: 2009 Ironwood Forest hikers, 
including Rotary Central members,
Grand Cayman Aug. 15, 2009.
http://portal.clubrunner.ca/1533/Stories/ironwood-forestPhoto: 2010 Ironwood Forest - marking the short, proposed Rotary Boardwalk to showcase some of Cayman's native trees,
Jeremy Olynik (DoE cartographer), Heidi Stafford, Kristan Godbeer (DoE Terrestrial Unit) 
Photo: Ann Stafford, June 22, 2010Photo: Candlewood  / Torchwood - Amyris elemifera, Endangered, Citrus Family: RUTACEAE. Compound leaf with 3 leaflets, very aromatic when crushed. Resinous Candlewood burns even when still green and was used for making torches and  kindling for lighting the  Lime Kiln woods burn coral rocks to make daub for wattle and daub houses.
 It is one of the larval food plants of the Cayman Swallowtail, a Grand Cayman endemic butterfly.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Mar.4, 2012Photo: Bunchosia - Bunchosia media, MALPIGHIACEAE,
shrub that grows in dry rocky woodlands.
Grand Cayman, Little Cayman, Cuba, Jamaica and Hispaniola
Photo: Ann Stafford, June 9, 2002
Proctor's Flora of the Cayman Islands 2012 p.507Photo: Bunchosia - Bunchosia media, MALPIGHIACEAE,
shrub with that grows in dry rocky woodlands.
Grand Cayman, Little Cayman, Cuba, Jamaica and Hispaniola
Photo: Ann Stafford, June 5, 2002
Proctor's Flora of the Cayman Islands 2012 p.507Photo: Pepper Cinnamon - Canella winterana, CANELLACEAE
Critically Endangered
Florida and the West Indies south to Barbados
P. Ann van B. Stafford June 6, 2003
http://regionalconservation.org/beta/nfyn/plantdetail.asp?tx=CanewintPhoto: Casearia hirsuta - Wild Coffee, SALICACEAE. Vulnerable.
Shrub, ALTERNATE leaves with numerous pellucid dots but scarcely any lines, 
finely puberulous on the upper side, velvety brownish-pubescent beneath.
Grand Cayman, Cayman Brac, Cuba, Hispaniola, Jamaica and northern South America, in rocky thickets and woodlands.
Flora of the Cayman Islands by George R. Proctor, 2012 p.317, Pl.20.
Image: Ann Stafford, Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, June 6, 2004.Photo: West Indian Cedar - Cedrela odorata, Critically Endangered, Family: MELIACEAE.
Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, Aug.9, 2009Photo: Chascotheca - Chascotheca neopeltandra, Family: EUPHORBIACEAE / PHYLLANTHACEAE.
Synonym: Chascotheca domingensis.
Dioecious shrub - fruiting. Grand Cayman, Cuba and Hispaniola.
Leaves 3 or 5 veined from the base p.437.
The Plant List Kew  http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl/record/kew-38438
Photo: P. Ann van B. Stafford, Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, March 25, 2008.
Flora of the Cayman Islands by George R. Proctor, 2012, p.440, Plate 37.
http://caymannature.blogspot.com/Photo: Broadleaf (Scarlet Cordia) -  Cordia sebestena var. caymanensis, BORAGINACEAE, 
one of Cayman’s 28 endemic plant species. It grows everywhere – 
in dry rocky woodlands, on the beach, on cliff rock, in swampy areas, in parks and gardens.
Photo: Ann Stafford, April 7, 2010Photo: Burn Nose, Daphnopsis americana, Family: THYMELAEACEAE. 
Dioecious - male and female flowers on separate trees. 
Critically Endangered in the Cayman Islands (Grand Cayman only). The fruits are a favorite of birds.
 Photo: P. Ann van B. Stafford, Oct. 26, 2009.
Flora of the Cayman Islands by George R. Proctor, 2012, p.403.Photo: Bastard Cherry - Ehretia tinifolia, Critically Endangered, BORAGINACEAE.
Ironwood Forest edge, behind University College of the Cayman Islands. 
Greater Antilles (except Puerto Rico), Swan Islands, Mexico and Honduras.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Aug. 9, 2009.
Flora of the Cayman Islands by George R. Proctor, 2012, p.563.Photo: Bastard Ironwood, Yellow Ironwood, Caribbean Princewood - Exostema caribaeum, RUBIACEAE
Shrub or slender tree that grows in dry rocky woodland; Endangered.
The showy flowers stay white only briefly.
Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, P. Ann van B. Stafford, July 24, 2005.
FLORA of the CAYMAN ISLANDS by George R. Proctor 2012 p.616, Fig,231, Plate 60.
http://www.regionalconservation.org/ircs/database/plants/PlantPageFK.asp?TXCODE=ExoscariPhoto: Narrow-leaf Ironwood, Crab Bush - Gymnanthes lucida, Critically Endangered, EUPHORBIACEAE.
Shrub/small tree, Florida and West Indies.
Photo: P. Ann van B. Stafford, April 25, 2010
Flora of the Cayman Islands by George R. Proctor, 2012, p.460.Photo: Hamelia cuprea - Antillean Firebush, RUBIACEAE, Vulnerable.
Shrub. Leaves in whorls of 3, long petioles
Showy, bright yellow trumpet-shaped flowers, streaked with orange.
Berries ovoid, ripening reddish black.
Cayman Islands, Cuba, Jamaica and Hispaniola, in rocky woodlands.
Hohenbergia caymanensis - Old George, BROMELIACEAE, Critically Endangered Grand Cayman endemic.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, June 15, 2005.
http://caymannature.wordpress.com/ironwood-forest/Photo: Hamelia cuprea - Antillean Firebush, RUBIACEAE, Vulnerable.
Shrub. Leaves in whorls of 3, long petioles
Showy, bright yellow trumpet-shaped flowers, streaked with orange.
Berries ovoid, ripening reddish black.
Cayman Islands, Cuba, Jamaica and Hispaniola, in rocky woodlands.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, June 16, 2005.
Proctor's FLORA of the CAYMAN ISLANDS 2012, p.626, Plate 62.
The common name Bahama Firebush is a misnomer because it doesn’t occur in the Bahamas.
http://www.floridanativenurseries.org/info/plants/the-hamelia-messPhoto: Peperomia glabella, Family: PIPERACEAE, Critically Endangered.
Creeping or sometimes pendent herb with ALTERNATE leaves, palmately 3-nerved from the base.
Grand Cayman, West Indies and continental tropical America, epiphytic or on rocks.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, March 23, 2003.
Flora of the Cayman Islands by George R. Proctor, 2012, p,230.Photo: Bitter Plum, (aka Black Ironwood, Dog Berry, Wild Plum, Cherry, Jamaica Walnut) - Picrodendron baccatum, Family: EUPHORBIACEAE) on the Mastic Trail. The deeply fissured grey bark sheds slowly in long thin strips. 
Range: Cayman Islands, Bahamas, Cuba, Hispaniola, Jamaica 
and the Swan Islands in rocky woodlands, some in rather swampy areas.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Jan.3, 2013
Flora of the Cayman Islands by George R. Proctor, 2012, p.446, Fig.160, Plate 38.Photo: Vine Pear Cactus – Selenicereus grandiflorus, Family: CACTACEAE, (Grand Cayman, Cuba and Jamaica),
very spiny stems trailing or high-climbing.
The cactus blooms at night, the flowers are dead by morning.
Photo: Peggy Leshikar-Denton, Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, May 30, 2004.
Proctor’s Flora of the Cayman Islands p.262Photo: Havana Solanum - Solanum havanense (flowers fade to white), SOLANACEAE.
Shrub, rocky woodlands, Grand Cayman, Cuba, Jamaica and Hispaniola.
Flora of the Cayman Islands by George R. Proctor, 2012, p.535
Photo taken on the Mastic Trail, Grand Cayman, P. Ann van B. Stafford, Oct. 5, 2007Photo: Havana Solanum - Solanum havanense Jacq., Family: SOLANACEAE.
Small shrub, leaves ALTERNATE, berries green (unripe), purple (ripe), in dry, rocky woodlands.
Distribution: Grand Cayman, Cuba, Jamaica and Hispaniola.
Image: Ann Stafford, Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman, Aug. 3, 2003.
Flora of the Cayman Islands by George R. Proctor, 2012 p.535, Plate 51.Photo: Trichilia - Trichilia havanensis, Family: MELIACEAE
Critically Endangered, one of Cayman's rarest trees, a few survive in the George Town area.
It rarely flowers or fruits, 
but puts out root runners from which new trees grow, making it very localized in one spot.
Ann Stafford, March 7, 2005Photo: Adrian's Cave, edge of Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Jan. 21, 2011Photo: Adrian's Cave, edge of Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman.
Photo: Ann Stafford, March 20, 2005Photo: Phyllanthus nutans ssp. nutans - Chinese Lantern, Family: EUPHORBIACEAE / PHYLLANTHACEAE.
Monoecious shrub, leaves pinnate-veined (p.437).
Grand Cayman, Jamaica and Swan Islands, in various habitats. Cayman plants occur in dry rocky woodlands.
Adrian's Cave, George Town, Grand Cayman.
Photo: P. Ann van B. Stafford, March 2, 2005.
Flora of the Cayman Islands by George R. Proctor 2012, page 442, Fig. 159.
http://caymannature.blogspot.com/Photo: Adrian's Cave, edge of Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Feb. 19, 2003Photo: Adrian's Cave, edge of Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Feb. 19, 2003Photo: Adrian's Cave, looking down into the water, from a hole in the roof, 
edge of Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Feb. 19, 2003Photo: Adrian's Cave, south exit, edge of Ironwood Forest, Grand Cayman.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Feb. 19, 2003Photo: Adrian's Cave, south exit, edge of Ironwood Forest, Outpost Road, Grand Cayman.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Feb. 19, 2003Photo: 2003 Cayman Prep School science teahers in the Ironwood Forest.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Grand Cayman, March 23, 2003Photo: Photo: Ironwood Forest, SE of George Town - Andy, Charmaine, Michelle and Manuel.
Photo: Ann Stafford, Grand Cayman, Nov.18, 2003.Photo: dead bulldozer after a preliminary area was cleared several years ago 
for a road at the edge of the very rocky Ironwood Forest.
June 25, 2008
NW edge track, S of Coemer Drive can be seen on Google map
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=grand+cayman&hl=en&ll=19.280978,-81.381569&spn=0.006613,0.009602&hnear=Grand+Cayman&t=h&vpsrc=6&z=17