54 Photos - Aug 6, 2015
Photo: This contemporary landscape features mostly native plants, suited for heavy clay soil and incorporates a rain garden/water feature into it's centre.Photo: Any opportunity to remove impervious asphalt is a good thing. This horrible property was made beautiful and soaked in rain water when it was finished. Look for the Working Women's Support Centre to see the finished product. This was done for HGTV's Green Force. You can see episodes at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLPRiOHoClwH2i8bXU5vIbAPhoto: Old asphalt was removed, making way for this beautiful landscape at the Working Women's Support Centre in Toronto. Designed by Carson Arthur & installed by Fern Ridge Landscaping.Photo: Planting milkweed (this is butterfly milkweed)  is great for our iconic Monarch butterfly. It's a great plant in the landscape, being super drought-tolerant and giving colour in late summer. It many parts of it are edible as well.Photo: Santa Fe Cream Shale made this a lovely permeable driveway.Photo: Most folks think planting in clay is challenging. All these plants LOVE clay - Coneflower, Blue-mist Spirea, Roses, Potentilla...and so much more!Photo: There are many great plants for the landscape including this lovely red Cardinal Flower (great for #rainscapes!) and the purple Ironweed. Ironweed is a butterfly magnate.Photo: At the customer's request, all the grass was removed and native plantings were created in an English Cottage style.Photo: We planted this entire landscape with edible plants BUT we designed it to be beautiful first and foremost.Photo: Dry creeks can be used to hold and infiltrate rainwater and channel flooding through the landscape in an ornamental way. Challenges in the garden should ALWAYS be dealt with in an ornamental fashion.Photo: Planting Nasturtiums (the orange flower with the round leaves) in an edible landscape help repel nematodes which affect crops such as cabbage.Photo: This is one of the many varieties of #permeable interlock which allow water to flow into the ground, keeping it out of storm sewers and protecting our lakes and streams...and it's pretty!Photo: Encouraging the birds to visit the garden is a great way to control pests and lower maintenance.Photo: A garden should never have a 'down time' - each season should be equally beautiful! Our Millennium Garden in Fall.Photo: This is a scree garden. It has no traditional soil but rather is built with gravel. It's a great home for drought tolerant plants such as our native Prickly Pear Cactus and interesting alpine plants. Scree gardens are the second-lowest maintenance form of garden, next to water gardens.Photo: Red Oak, Bigroot Geranium, Blue Atlas Cedar and more combine to make this simple landscape beautiful but low maintenance. Reducing the use of lawn in the landscape is great for the environment and reduces water use. In the traditional landscape, North Americans use 60% of our potable water (expensive!!!) in the landscape.Photo: Dry creeks can be used to hold and infiltrate rainwater and channel flooding through the landscape in an ornamental way. Challenges in the garden should ALWAYS be dealt with in an ornamental fashion.Photo: This garden (newly planted in this photo) is a series of rain gardens designed to handle a spring that popped up in the back yard AND water pumped out of the basement. Even during the Beaches Flood, while all the other properties on the street flooded, this one did not!Photo: Even in Oakville clay, permeable stone helps water infiltrate. it looks stunning and will last hundreds of years. Limestone cobbles act as a soldier row, holding it all together.Photo: Double-fired clay brick and square-cut limestone flag make this yard elegant and useful. See the gaps? It's designed to be permeable. Designed by Carson Arthur and installed by Fern Ridge.Photo: One of our many public #rainscapes, Green Glade School shows folks that rain water handling can be ornamental as can drought tolerant planting. Created in association with Credit Valley Conservation and Aquafor Beech.Photo: Educating the public about eco-landscaping, including bioretention cells (engineered #rainscapes) is a large part of what we do at Fern Ridge Landscaping! Created in association with Credit Valley Conservation and Aquafor Beech.Photo: Having butterflies in the garden makes it feel more peaceful. Having food such as fennel means food for caterpillars. This is a Black Swallowtail caterpillar JUST getting ready to pupate and become a butterfly. Photo: Fern Ridge has done many consults for eco-landscaping for conservation authorities, homeowners and even municipalities, like here in Kitchener.Photo: Eco-solutions don't have to be a sacrifice! Solutions, like this iron channel to focus rainwater into a bioretention cell (an engineered rain garden) can be just as beautiful as those in a 'regular' landscape.Photo: Many edible and medicinal plants such as beebalm (used in Earl Gray tea) and Echinacea are quite lovely and drought tolerant. They're also great for pollinators and birds.Photo: This drought-tolerant garden is built on pure sand and looks great, even in winter.Photo: Anderson Parkette was created in collaboration with Oakville Horticulture Society and the Town of Oakville to show folks how stunning a #biodiversity garden could be. All plants are Ontario natives or nativars and are chosen for their ability to support #pollinator and bird life.Photo: Anderson Parkette was created in collaboration with Oakville Horticulture Society and the Town of Oakville to show folks how stunning a #biodiversity garden could be. All plants are Ontario natives or nativars and are chosen for their ability to support #pollinator and bird life. It's important to have sitting areas where folks can relax and enjoy the beauty.Photo: Anderson Parkette was created in collaboration with Oakville Horticulture Society and the Town of Oakville to show folks how stunning a #biodiversity garden could be. All plants are Ontario natives or nativars and are chosen for their ability to support #pollinator and bird life. Educational signage is important so people understand that what they're seeing is not just beautiful, it's eco-friendly.Photo: Anderson Parkette was created in collaboration with Oakville Horticulture Society and the Town of Oakville to show folks how stunning a #biodiversity garden could be. All plants are Ontario natives or nativars and are chosen for their ability to support #pollinator and bird life. Wild strawberries and Blanket Flower are prominent.Photo: Gardening is art as much as science. Painting with plants!Photo: Some towns still don't allow boulevard plantings but they're more eco-friendly than turf since they need less water and  don't require mowers that spew pollution. The fact is, that most municipalities will overlook these initiatives even if they're against policyPhoto: Got a large property and you're tired of cutting the grass. Convert some to meadow! This meadow garden is super low maintenance, great for biodiversity and pollinators. Just cut it down in the spring.Photo: The Fern Ridge Crew planting trees for the bioretention cells/rain garden at the IMAX headquarters in Mississauga. It's tough work but someone's gotta do it!Photo: After an incident where Canada's largest bioretention cell was flooded with sediment, Fern Ridge was called in to remediate, redesign and replant. We focused on adding ornamental plants such as Swamp Rose, Blue Cardinal Flower and Siberian Iris to improve biodiversity and beauty.Photo: Encouraging biodiversity = fewer pests. (and Praying Mantids are just plain COOL)Photo: This ENTIRE meal came from the garden at our Fern Ridge home/office. You can do it too!Photo: Anderson Parkette has matured beautiful  because it had proper maintenance and waiting when it was young and regular watering (1 inch per week) for the first year of establishment. Ironically drought tolerant plants require MORE care during the first year but after that life is easy.Photo: Portico Church in Mississauga expanded their parking lot. To protect the nearby creek, Credit Valley Conservation requested a bioretention garden be installed. The original design (not by Fern Ridge) looked to 'natural' for the client and we were called in to add more ornamental plants to make it more public-pleasing. Great success! More flowers, more foliage colour and more fall and winter interest!Photo: Portico Church in Mississauga expanded their parking lot. To protect the nearby creek, Credit Valley Conservation requested a bioretention garden be installed. The original design (not by Fern Ridge) looked to 'natural' for the client and we were called in to add more ornamental plants to make it more public-pleasing. Great success! More flowers, more foliage colour and more fall and winter interest!Photo: We upgraded this garden to make it more ornamental and add biodiversity. A great opportunity.Photo: This waterway channels water from a spring in the backyard AND from a basement sump pump into an series of infiltration/evaporation ponds. This keeps water out of our storm sewers, protecting our creeks and lakes.Photo: Working at Alton Public School, in association with Credit Valley Conservation and numerous volunteers we installed a garden which is half #rainscape and half #xeriscape. Great education for all and beautiful.Photo: We encourage birds in our garden! This White-breasted Nuthatch flew in through the office window. We actually HAVE a butterfly net in the office so it was quick work to catch him without hurting him and release him back into the wild. Birds in the garden control pests and make it more relaxing for us. Nuthatches and chickadees, for instance, have developed a taste for the eggs of invasive gypsy moth!Photo: Fern Ridge worked with several forestry groups including Trees Canada to create this lovely display garden at the Green Living Show to educate the public about the value of forests and of planting trees.Photo: A #xeriscaped (drought-tolerant garden) wildflower boulevard planting beside a permeable driveway. The best of many worlds!Photo: This permeable patio uses Subterra Stone by Permacon and black granite gravel between the stones makes this patio even more lovely. All the plants in this garden are either edible, fermentable or medicinal and many are great for pollinators and biodiversity as well.Photo: Photo: Fern Ridge getting an award from Oakville Eco-partners. This is one of our many eco-awards. We've also received recognition from Credit Valley Conservation, Conservation Halton, the Town of Milton and two horticultural societies including the Oakville Horticultural Society.Photo: At Elm Drive School, we upgraded these planting, working with Credit Valley Conservation and the City of Mississauga, we upgrades these #rainscape plantings to make them more ornamental and public pleasing. It was a big hit! Great in Winter and all season.Photo: This is the 'before' pic of one of the rain gardens. Much visual improvement and great infiltration keeping streams clear of fertilizer and sediment runoff and cooling the water before it gets to our lakes and fish habitat!
Photo: This garden is 100% edible! ANY style of gardening can and SHOULD be beautiful!Photo: This is a dry creek which in a heavy rainfall becomes a flowering, beautiful water feature. Handling rainwater should NEVER be ugly.