Photo: The forest is his home
This man is the headman or chief of a settlement inside Bandhavgarh National Park. He belongs to the Bharia tribe, an ancient aboriginal tribe of the Vindhyas region in Central India. His clan holds land deep inside the forest where they grow crops and collect minor forest produce. We met him here: 23°43'30.69"N 80°56'48.76"E on a track skirting the edge of his land. His tribe settled here in 1932, and have lived ever since in peace with the denizens of the forest. Was it not, only the day before yesterday, that he had watched a tigress with three cubs walking along the track we stood on?
He advised us to look elsewhere for the striped feline, with a gentle smile creased across his ancient face. It was great to have met him in his environment!
Photo: Red-headed Vulture Sarcogyps calvus - Critically Endangered
This vulture was historically abundant over south-central and south-eastern Asia. Today the range is localized primarily to northern India. The species has suffered an extremely rapid population reduction in the recent past which is likely to continue into the near future, probably largely as a result of feeding on carcasses of animals treated with the veterinary drug Diclofenac, perhaps in combination with other causes. It is unlikely that more than a couple of thousand of these birds exist in India and the world.
Bandhavgarh National Park, India.
My contribution to #ThreatenedThursday curated by +Diego Cattaneo +Sandy Schepis +Anette Mossbacher and myself. +Threatened Thursday
Photo: Red Jungle Fowl - the wild ancestor of all chicken
Archeological evidence indicates that the 'mother of all poultry' is the Red Jungle Fowl (Gallus gallus) found in India and Southeast Asia. This is further supported by genetic tests. Domestication of chicken has been observed at the Indus valley as early as 3,200 BC.
Thought this was an appropriate bird to share at this time of the year when eggs are in favour :)
Bandhavgarh National Park, India
Note: I have darkened the busy background manually to focus on the bird
Photo: Hanuman Langur or Grey Langur Semnopithecus entellus
Hanuman langurs inhabit tropical, dry thorn scrub, pine and alpine forest, and urban areas. They are widespread across India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Burma. Being social animals, they live in groups which can number over 60!
Bandhavgarh National Park, India.
Photo: A forest scene
Evening is setting in and the forest has gone all quiet. The clash of antlers, as chital stags spar, reverberates through the woods. A small brook gurgles softly, and from the far distance the deep growl of the king of the forest reaches our ears. Can there be a better place to spend an afternoon?
Bandhavgarh National Park, Madhya Pradesh, India
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Sumit Sen
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Red Jungle Fowl - the wild ancestor of all chicken
Archeological evidence indicates that the 'mother of all poultry' is the Red Jungle Fowl (Gallus gallus) found in India and Southeast Asia. This is further supported by genetic tests. Domestication of chicken has been observed at the Indus valley as early as 3,200 BC.
Thought this was an appropriate bird to share at this time of the year when eggs are in favour :)
Bandhavgarh National Park, India
Note: I have darkened the busy background manually to focus on the bird
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