Photo: Beaming

Careful planning in the field - and complicated post-processing. This one wasn't easy!

So - how do you capture a scene like this one? This is one of the more difficult situations to work with. First, the range of light is extreme - dark shadows and blinding highlights mean I can't capture the entire dynamic range in a single exposure. And since the light beams reach below the horizon line and the dark trees stretch above it, a Graduated Neutral Density filter will cause as many problems as it solves.

The solution? Bracketing. I took three exposures to capture most of the dynamic range. One shot exposed for the darkest shadows. One for the mid-tones. And one for the highlights. I let the brightest area inside the sun remain over exposed, since we can't see details there in reality and reducing the brightness of the sun would create a very odd, unnatural look.

Once I had those three images, I needed to blend them as smoothly as possible. I processed each image carefully for the area it would represent. I used the mid-tone image for most of the sky, and used the other two images to bring out details in the trees and foreground... and of course, the bright areas around the sun. Then, using layers and very careful masks in Photoshop, I blended the three images. I use the "iHDR" manual blending technique that +Jay Patel and I have developed over the years. It's much more effective than your standard HDR software because it allows us to apply blending only where it's really needed.

When blending was finished, I removed a bit of lens flare (which is often a problem when you are shooting directly into the sun).

Is it perfect? Almost certainly not... but it does represent the scene as I remember it. What do you think? Does the scene feel natural and real to you? Does it evoke an emotional response?
Photo: Another beautiful day in Iceland!

Here's a like to our blog post for Day 6:
http://www.photographybyvarina.com/photography/blog/iceland-day-6-2

#PhotographyTips

I took this shot of Skógafoss with a 70-200mm lens, a circular polarizer, and a neutral density filter. I needed a longish shutter speed to blue the surface of the water in bright conditions, so that the rainbow would stand out against a smooth background. The neutral density filter helped with that - and the polarizer allowed me to increase the shutter speed even more, while also helping to bring out the brilliant colors in the rainbow. With both filters, I could reduce the shutter speed to .6 seconds at f/11. Just enough to smooth the water to my liking.

This was such a beautiful location - but the climb was steep. After my little run-in with the icebergs the day before, I couldn't climb the hill... so I stayed behind. At first I planned to just sit back and enjoy the beautiful sunshine while I waited, but the more I looked at the falls, the more I wanted to shoot it. The view from below wasn't very exciting... I wanted something a little different. And this is the result. This was the best weather of the entire trip, too. Warm and sunny! Such pleasure after yesterdays difficulties!
Photo: iHDR Overview

Wondering how +Jay Patel and I blend images with a very broad dynamic range? Our latest blog post gives you an overview.

Here's the link: http://www.photographybyvarina.com/photography/blog/ihdr-workflow-overview

Please feel free to share!

So, what is iHDR? It stands for Intelligent High Dynamic Range - and it's our manual blending technique for images with a very broad range of light... like the one you see here.

This is what I'll be doing with some of the images I brought back from Glacier National Park. I can't wait to get crackin'! :)
Photo: Free Photoshop Watermark Action - by Varina and +Jay Patel 

Here's the link:

http://www.photographybyvarina.com/free_downloads/actionsbyvarinaandjay.zip

Lots of people ask us how to create a watermark on an image - so we decided to add a watermark action to our free collection. The set already includes two framing actions - one for black frames, and one for white ones - and an action that overlays a copyright notice on your image. Now,we've added another one...

This one overlays a watermark symbol or letter like the example you see here. You can choose your font, adjust the size of the symbol, and place it anywhere you like within the frame.

All four actions resize your image for web display, convert the image to sRGB for optimal viewing in any browser, and sharpen the photo - allowing you some basic control over the finished product.You can even adapt each action for your own use as you see fit.

Please pass it on - if you know others who might find this collection useful, please feel free to share. That's what it's all about!

Oh yeah - and for those who are wondering - this is Glacier National Park in Montana! We're headed there to teach a workshop next week! Can't wait!
Photo: Solitude

One of the biggest reasons I choose to photograph nature is because I love solitude. I find that this is true for many nature and landscape photographers. We seem to share an appreciation - no... it goes beyond that - a NEED for solitude.

I get along with people just fine. I don't mind speaking to large crowds. I can navigate my way through a city without a problem...

But I'd much rather be in the middle of nowhere. No cars driving by. No airplanes flying overhead. No lawn mowers or leaf blowers or weed trimmers. No radio or television. Just birdsong and the breeze through the branches and the trickle of the water over the rocks. I'm perfectly happy out there for hours. Days. Weeks.

How about the rest of you? What is it about nature photography that keeps you coming back for more?
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iHDR Overview

Wondering how +Jay Patel and I blend images with a very broad dynamic range? Our latest blog post gives you an overview.

Here's the link: http://www.photographybyvarina.com/photography/blog/ihdr-workflow-overview

Please feel free to share!

So, what is iHDR? It stands for Intelligent High Dynamic Range - and it's our manual blending technique for images with a very broad range of light... like the one you see here.

This is what I'll be doing with some of the images I brought back from Glacier National Park. I can't wait to get crackin'! :)

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