8 Photos - Dec 17, 2012
Photo: A cluster of spore-filled sporangia and specialized protective hairs called paraphyses of the Polypodium virginianum, a common fern in the eastern U.S., is seen in this image captured using confocal microscopy. Igor Siwanowicz of the HHMI Janelia Farm Research Campus, Ashburn, Va., won third prize in the Olympus BioScapes competition with this image.Photo: Muscles and rows of pigment cells (melanocytes) are visible in this view of the claw of the crustacean Phronima sp. by Christian Sardet (Villefranche sur mer, France) and Sharif Mirshak (Montreal) of the Plankton Chronicles Project. This image won fourth prize in the Olympus BioScapes competition.Photo: This image shows the beta-tubulin expression of a fruit fly's third instar larval brain, with attached eye imaginal discs. This image, captured using confocal microscopy by Christian Klämbt and Imke Schmidt of the University of Münster in Germany, won seventh prize in the Olympus BioScapes competition.Photo: The Olympus BioScapes International Digital Imaging Competition honors the world's most extraordinary microscopic images of life science subjects. This picture from Charles Krebs of Issaquah, Wash., shows butterfly wing scales at 200x magnification. The image, which won 10th prize in Olympus BioScapes competition, was captured using diffused reflected illumination. Click on to see the rest of the top 10 and some of the Honorable Mentions.Photo: This water flea (Daphnia) was captured using image stacking by Michael Crutchley of Pembrokeshire, Wales, Great Britain. The image received an Honorable Mention in the Olympus BioScapes competition.Photo: A soldier fly (Stratiomyidae) is seen in this image, captured with epi-illumination by Laurie Knight of Maidstone, England. It received an Honorable Mention in the Olympus BioScapes competition.Photo: This cutaway view of a grape hyacinth (Muscari) flower was captured using brightfield image stacking by Frederic Labaune of Auxonne, France. The image received an Honorable Mention in the Olympus BioScapes competition.Photo: This frontal view of the head of a pharaoh ant (Monomorium pharaonis), a common indoor pest, was captured using confocal microscopy by Jan Michels of the Institute of Zoology at Christian-Albrechts University in Kiel, Germany. The image received an Honorable Mention in the Olympus BioScapes competition.