96 Photos - Jul 26, 2011
Photo: Trinity

An older image of Trinity that I just processed.

I recently purchased a hand painted canvas backdrop from Oliphant Studios in New York. I love it so much! It was rather scary ordering it over the phone, but I trusted that Sarah, the artist, who has been doing this a long, long time, knows what she is doing. They are pretty pricey and I agonized over the size I should get. Initially, I thought I could get away with a 9’ x 12’, but in the end, decided on a 9’ x 16’ instead. Much larger that I need right now, but you never know what the future will hold.

Buy once, cry once :)

Anyway, I have the Oliphant set up on the ‘chair’ side of my studio, which I thought I’d be using more. But wouldn’t ya know, I’ve fallen in love with the ‘table’ side set up, which still has the thunder gray seamless as the backdrop.

Crap!

I tried moving the table set up over to the Oliphant side, but for some reason, I didn’t like the results as much and moved it back. So now I am not using the Oliphant side that much :(

Well, I love the effect of the Oliphant backdrop so much, that I have since tried to recreate it on images that were shot against the gray seamless. This is one of those attempts. Definitely NOT THE SAME as the Oliphant, but I guess you can say ‘similar’. There is just something so authentic about the Oliphant, I really can’t put my finger on it. A ‘classic’ look. So, do I get another one for the other side? I think YES! But first, I want to use the one I have a little more. Then I’ll decide if I want to get another identical one or a different texture/color. One thing is for sure, it won’t be 9’ x 16’!

This image was taken against the Oliphant.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/14388313591/

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: Model: Rory Riccella

When a subject has the ability to express so much emotion with just their eyes, like Rory has here, I feel like I just won the lottery. I can't express how elated I am when I see results like this one. Unfortunately, most subjects don't naturally possess this skill and it is often times very challenging to teach on the fly. I've started to ask my subjects to squint and bulge their eyes at the same time. This helps, but only for those that know how to squint! Surprisingly, I have encountered some that can't for the life of them, squint their eyes. Eventually, we work through it, but it is very refreshing to have it come so naturally.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: Love these people :)Photo: Photo: Model: Aaron Mendoza

Oh my, here is another of Mr. Mendoza, aka ‘Dozer’, a rather different side.

I was grasping at straws trying to come up with an idea for this shoot with Aaron. I knew with his boyish good looks, it wouldn't be difficult to get some ‘nice’ shots, but I wanted something different. I wanted something dark. I saw an image on Pinterest by Annie Leibovitz of Jimmy Fallon in mime make up and a light bulb went off. I had never imagined Jimmy in such a portrait, just as I would never imagine Aaron in something similar. Completely out of character. That’s what I wanted!

We did some with a beret and some with the top hat. Some were with just the red striped shirt and others with the black leather jacket. I liked this combination best, but mostly, it was the one with the best expression. Sadly, we waited till the very end of the shoot to do these and by then, Aaron was a little tired in the eyes. So, unfortunately, the majority were below my expectations. The make up can only add so much. The expression still HAS to be there. Otherwise, it’s just a guy in make up. No story. The expression tells the story, ALONG with the makeup and clothes.

So, not my best, but a fun image regardless!

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: Model: Aaron Mendoza, aka 'Dozer'

It always amazes me at how ‘famous’ my subjects photograph, no?

Aaron is a young man that lives nearby and rides downhill (extreme mountain biking) with our employee, Kickstand. He had seen the recent images I took of Kick and asked if I could do a shoot with him.

I had some clothing and poses picked out in advance, that I thought would enhance the cavalier 'playboy' image I had in mind for Aaron. Some worked, some didn't. This one I love. The eyes are everything. Aaron was an absolute natural and it shows...

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at an Oliphant hand painted custom canvas backdrop

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: Renaissance Girl

Model: Trinity Santiago

Here’s one of Trinity from a recent shoot. Still playing catchup...

I receive a lot of appreciation from folks in regards to my posting the lighting details on my images. I find it disheartening that there are those out there that are afraid of sharing their tech specs with others that are looking to learn. While I am way too lazy to offer tutorials on how I make and process my images, if I wasn’t, I would in a heartbeat. I am of the belief that there is only one of me and no one can steal me. Others can copy my style... but who cares! I am flattered. Along that note, it’s my subjects that make my images special. Each one walks into the studio amazing beyond words and all I do is capture them in pixels. They are all one of a kind and cannot be replicated :)

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: Model: Rory Riccella

*Image reversed in post

I've photographed Rory's sister Sydney previously and all I can say is, this family has good genes!

Sydney came along and was a wonderful assistant, especially in the messing up hair department!

Although Rory was nervous initially, he quickly warmed up, felt comfortable and took direction really well.

All in all, a fun shoot with some great images as a result, what more can you ask for?

Here’s his sister Sydney, from a past shoot...

www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/11516693673/


Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: You got a problem?

Although I had never met Nate prior to our shoot, he is very good friends with several of my other subjects. I could tell that he would be an interesting person to photograph because, LOOK AT THAT BEARD! Need I say more? Combine that with his YouTube video ‘Extreme Barbie Jeep Racing’, and needless to say, he was a very interesting subject indeed!

The theme of this shoot is ‘Meat and Potatoes’ and here is one of the images from it with Nate.

A friend just happened to have a dead bird in her freezer which she so graciously offered to let me borrow for this shoot. This is one of those instances that slap me in the face to remind me that I am not in New York anymore. I never met a soul in NY that just happened to have a dead animal in their icebox. No one. Ever. That being said, this is not an uncommon occurrence here in Utah.

Originally, I planned on putting the bird on the plate, but at the last minute, decided on buying a piece of chicken to put on the plate instead. It was Nate’s idea to add the stray feathers and red food color to the chicken, which I am grateful for, because those details really help to tell the story. When it comes to ‘themes’, I just grasp at straws with my limited imagination. Ideas don't always work out, but you never know until you try!

Here is the link to Nate’s ‘Extreme Barbie Jeep Racing’ video on YouTube:

Extreme barbie jeep racing

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: Kayla Sunshine

I'll jump at the chance to photograph a person with dreads and when the last minute opportunity came knocking to photograph Kayla, I did just that. She is the daughter of a friend, here for just a quick visit. I had very little prep time and just did the best I could.

I am still a little rusty from the time off. Because photographing women are so much more difficult, the rustiness felt very evident. Especially in my posing direction. I don't remember my left from right, so it can be very frustrating for me and the subject while trying to explain what I want. After a rough start, we both found our groove and things went pretty smooth from there.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: WTF?

Model: Jeremy Hottenger

I have two crows on loan from a friend and asked Kickstand to come over and help me put them to use. There was tons of laughing throughout and I think we got a couple of interesting images in the end.

I was somewhat stressed out prior as I have not truly perfected the table set up. In addition, I moved the main light to the other side. But I took my own advice for a change, relaxed and remembered that every image does not need to be a masterpiece.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: WTF?

Model: Jeremy Hottenger

I have two crows on loan from a friend and asked Kickstand to come over and help me put them to use. There was tons of laughing throughout and I think we got a couple of interesting images in the end.

I was somewhat stressed out prior as I have not truly perfected the table set up. In addition, I moved the main light to the other side. But I took my own advice for a change, relaxed and remembered that every image does not need to be a masterpiece.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Model: Rory Riccella

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Model: Lorin Whitaker

Lorin was so kind to volunteer to be a guinea pig. I tested some new poses with him and he was such a great sport! I have to say, that although I was very apprehensive at first, I am loving the table set up. I think a prop on the table really helps tell a story, but I am usually at a loss when it comes to finding/choosing one. The true test, I think, is having a strong enough image that tells a story without a prop. Not easy to do, but I think this image achieves that goal.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Eating Crow
Continuing the crow theme.

Jeremy ate the other crow...

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: The Raven Whisperer

I had a shoot planned with Eric today. I had no idea he was so passionate about ravens. In fact, the name of his company is The Raven Workshop! The timing could not have been more perfect. I just happened to have two ravens on loan in the studio :)

I always say that I need just one great image to consider a shoot a success. I definitely got more than one from this shoot, but if all I got was this one, I would be ecstatic, nonetheless. Because it doesn't just tell a story, it tells a REAL story...

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Greg Istock

You might recognize this image of Greg, the husband of my wonderful friend, Val.

It was taken 2 yrs. ago, during a workshop held in my studio by +Don Giannatti 

I reprocessed it to sort of fit my new style. Again I had to redo the orientation, as the original image of Greg was shot vertically and I needed it to be horizontal.

Don gets full credit for the lighting, which was absolutely beautiful. Thank you, Don!

Lighting Info:
All lights are AlienBee B800's

- 5' octa on subject's right, 90º angle, with subject placed to the rear of the light
- White V-flat on subject's left, for fill.
- Strip box in front and to the left of subject, for additional fill.
- Strobe with bare reflector placed a foot from the thunder gray seamless, directly behind subject

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Oy Vey!

My husband Fred

I get a chuckle when people tell me that I COULD charge for my portraits.
I interpret this as, they think my work is good enough that other people would pay money for it. If money exchanged hands, I would then be validated and so would my work.

I know when people say this to me, they are just being nice and it is meant solely as a compliment. But I often wonder about the value of something when it costs a lot of money as opposed to when it is given away for free.

When I was first introduced to Sue Bryce and her style of portraiture, I was in awe. I immediately wanted to emulate her style. I studied her posing techniques and would practice them on friends any chance I could get. I would show my guinea pigs examples of Sues’ work and tell them how much I idolized her and her style. I would always mention that her average portrait session costs $3000.00. People pay her $3000.00 for a few photos and she is worth it! Her talent has tremendous value. Somehow, the fact that she can charge that kind of money and a wait list of clients waiting to pay it, put her in a class higher than any I could aspire to be in. The creme de la creme.

What does that say about me?

Well, my work has value to me on several levels, beyond any dollar amount. It provides me with a sense of esteem and self worth. The piece if mind, that when I’m gone, I will be remembered for something more than just the mundane. I will have left something behind that has value, but not the monetary kind. No one will care how much my portraits cost the sitter. That will be irrelevant.

So even though I have been told that I am a failure my entire life and to this day (thanks mom), my images to me, prove that I am not. That is the value.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Ben

I haven't taken any new photos for several months now, so I am just going over past shoots to see if I missed anything. I liked this image, but it 'didn't make the cut', rather it's an outtake. I don't mind posting these 'ok' images here on G+, I just didn't think that it was portfolio worthy.

If I recall, it was the lighting that I was most dissatisfied with... too bright. I was testing this set up with the table for the first time and experimenting with the positioning of the table/subject/lights. Did not nail it on this shoot, but thankfully I did on the shoot that I was testing it for, with Dallas.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Model: Austen Woodard

One from a shoot with Austen a while back. I always liked this image, but I often times struggle with color correcting subjects with light colored hair. This image was no exception. I made several failed attempts in the past and tried one last time. Here is the result, not perfect, but good enough for me.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Model: Torrey Gooch

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Motorcycle Man

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: The Haircut
Behind the scenes

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Taelyn

I didn't really like this image after taking it back in Aug. '13, because of the horrendous time I had color correcting the skin... but guess what?

Now, I like it.

Go figure...

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Shay

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Horsing Around

I love my husband! He makes the best test subject :)

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Wild, Wild West

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: The Easter Fairy

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Model: Lydia Gooch

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: The Horseman

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Pardon me, do you have any Grey Poupon?

Ludovic speaks with the most beautiful French accent to ever grace my ears :)

The next day the hair and beard were history...

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: The Wild Side Of Don

When I woke up this morning, I never imagined that later in the evening I would be photographing Don Giannatti in my studio, with 10 of his Project 52 group members watching.

Don had messaged me a few days prior, letting me know that he was going to be in town with his group and asked if I would like to join them for dinner. I was honored that he asked and had a wonderful time, chatting with Don and the group members who were visiting, some from as far away as Sweden.

Afterwards, I invited everyone back to the studio, which has never seen so many people in it ever! I did an abbreviated session with The Don and this image is one of my favorites. I chose this one, because his expression and posture are so removed from what I would consider 'normal' for Don...

...or maybe not :)

I first met Don Giannatti after winning his 'Winner Gets Me' contest a few years ago. He came to my studio and gave me a one on one lighting workshop. I am grateful to Don, an amazing person and brilliant teacher.

What a fun evening... you never know what life is gonna throw at you.

A big 'Thank You' to Don and his group!

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Rough Life

Umm... I think I like the table :)

Yes, I reversed the image...

Been a bit busier. Back to work after a 3 month seasonal layoff from cleaning muddy, greasy bikes at the bike shop.

No comment.

Lighting info:
*Remember, the image was reversed in post...
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Taelyn

I love the bird! A re-creation of an image I did a while ago with Trinity, this time with Taelyn.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Model: Taelyn

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Model: Taelyn

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Model: Antoine Bizet

Unless you are into downhill freeride mountain biking, you probably have never heard of the Redbull Rampage. Rampage takes place once a year (or every other year), in Virgin, Utah - the birthplace of the sport. Antoine is a Rampage competitor and in 2012 he placed 2nd. Although he resides in Versailles, France, Antoine is back again in Southern Utah for another visit and I had the privilege to photograph him.

Due to the language barrier, it was a little more challenging than usual to direct the poses. In the end, we got some images that his mum will be proud of :)

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: The 2nd image from my shoot with documentarian, journalist, filmmaker and photographer, Dallas Hyland.

This was my favorite, too :)

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Bad To The Bone

The 1st image from my shoot with documentarian, journalist, filmmaker and photographer, Dallas Hyland.

This was my favorite.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Model: Sydney Riccella Kitzmiller

By now it is probably evident that I don't shoot couples. I mention this, because I was asked to do so recently and I cringed. I am not a fan of couples portraits. There may be a connection between the two subjects, but I think the connection with the photographer gets lost. It's challenging enough to extract the expression I'm looking for from ONE subject, let alone TWO.... at the same time! Too much work. I'm sure I could get a few okay ones, but you know how I feel about okay... BORING.

As I think about it, I realize that the couples portrait is for the couple. That's probably a large contributing factor why I don't like taking them. My portraits are for me, not the subject. I don't expect my subject to like the result. Of course it is flattering if they do, but I think more often than not, they don't. Probably because their pose and expression in the finished image is so far from how they thought it felt like when they were in front of the camera. I'm not really sure, I'm just guessing. I try to make it clear that I am not interested in making them look good. I am interested in making them look INTERESTING.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Model: Dreylicious Lee

I think this is my new 'Go-To' pose.
There are just certain poses that I have great luck with the majority of subjects I use them on. This has become one of them. It started with a toned down version, Sunshine In Overalls, then amped up just slightly more with Whitney and now it has evolved into this one of Dreylicious.

What a fun shoot. Drey is a massage therapist and just an all round amazing person. She wanted to celebrate her 40th birthday with a photo shoot. Afterwards, she was gathering a group of friends to do 40 sun salutations. Rumor on the street was that she was a bit sore after the shoot from the posing. Very few people comprehend just how strenuous a photo shoot can be. Even I'm sore from showing the poses I want from the subject. After this one, I told my husband that I'm getting too old for this! This is why I need to be able to verbalize the poses, so I don't have to physically show them.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Ben 2

I could not decide which image of Ben with the mohawk that I liked better. I will have to let my critics decide! They are too similar to use both in my portfolio, so What Say You?

I am not in love with the images from this shoot and I finally realized the reason is the lighting. It is WAY TOO BRIGHT and not enough shadows! Just when you think you have things figured out, BAM! Kicked in the knees.

This makes me want to throw in the towel using the table set up, but part of me is intent on mastering it. I'll see what I've learned from this maiden shoot and hope and pray I get things better on my second attempt.

Another issue that was brought to my attention yesterday, is the cropping issue. I knew I forgot something! I am the worst cropper in the world and now this new set up introduces additional headaches with cropping.

I need to:
Place the light closer to a 90 degree angle
Possibly lower the fill light setting
See if there's a way to place the subject off center and crop the image better
Shoot from a higher angle
Figure out correct chair height
Work on poses

Oy!

Lighting info:
-AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
-AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
-AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Ben 1

Whoa! Lots of changes...

I have a shoot coming up that will have the subject, who is a journalist, using a typewriter. With that in mind, I made a table top out of scrap wood that can be used to rest the typewriter on. Ben was kind enough to come by and let me test the new set up on him. It didn't hurt that he needed a haircut :)

As most know, I hate change and it feels like I am starting over from scratch. But I don't set my expectations so high and just have to keep reminding myself that there will be plenty of kinks until they get sorted out.

I like the color of the wood. Whew! The length, Im not sure about. Do I want to see the edges? Hmmm...

Another question mark is my shooting angle. I think I prefer the images where I shot slightly above the subject, instead of at the same level, or gasp, from below, which I am prone to do.

I would prefer more shadows, so I think the main light is too far in front of the subject or there is too much fill, so the lighting needs to be tweaked as well.

Ben's arms got in he way of many of the poses I wanted to do, so that is a consideration for future shoots.

I started Ben out on a taller stool, which was a little awkward, so seat height needs to be ironed out.

On the post processing front, there is also an issue with the table appearing too red in the images.
I left it with the reddish cast in a few because I didn't even notice it, but when I did notice it in another image, I was pissed I didn't notice it sooner! I think I prefer it to look more neutral in color.

Lastly, to confuse things even more, I tried this 30 second tip from +Scott Kelby that helps to correct white balance. I was shocked after I followed the advice. The 'after' image looked like it had a very blue cast. But when I looked at the 'before' version, it looked incredibly yellow. Oh no! So now, my new images may look a little colder than in the past. I'm not sure about it, but looking at the 'before' photos... I think they were definitely too yellow. Oy!

The more I learn, the less I know.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Girl From The Hood

This is my 3rd shoot with Carma, a young lady from the 'hood.

I am finding myself wanting to reshoot a lot of my former subjects in my new 'style'.
So happy to have that opportunity with Carma!

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Rockstar

More Whitney. Well, if Whitney isn't already a musician, she should be, because to me she looks like a freakin' rockstar!

I've been noticing recently a few images popping up in some Flickr Groups that pay homage to my chair set up. Some have given credit, so I know for a fact it is not my imagination that the images look very similar to mine. I am so flattered! Never would I have ever imagined myself being an inspiration to others.

Sorry for digressing and getting back to seeing other folks' spin on the chair set up. What I notice on occasion... and it really bothers me, is the use of the chair gratuitously.

gra·tu′i·tous·ly
Unnecessary or unwarranted; unjustified

My feeling is... if it doesn't add, it detracts.
The chair needs to serve a purpose in ADDITION to just sitting on it. Holding, resting, leaning, gripping, grabbing... something more than just plan sitting. I should clarify, that this applies to when the chair is turned around backwards, like it is in my images.

Just seeing the back of the chair, without the subject incorporating it somehow into the pose, looks wrong. I formed this opinion after seeing plenty of my own images with the chair serving no purpose.

Now, if the chair is in a normal sitting position, that's a different situation. But honestly, I have not yet figured out how to make a subject look interesting while sitting normally in a chair. But when (or if) I do, I'll make sure to give you my opinion about it :)

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Model: Yolanda Damon Harris

Another shoot with Yolanda and another hair color! The first time I photographed Yo, it was brilliant red... then purple and now aqua.

I think I do remember her natural color thrown in for good measure...

What next?

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Where The Magic Happens :)

Model: Lydia Rose Gooch

Not a very good behind the scenes, because the background light is obstructed by the chair and the fill light is behind me, out of view.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6*Photo: Model: Whitney Lawhon

Here's another from my shoot with Whitney.

Well, if Whitney isn't already a musician, she should be, because to me she looks like a freakin' rock star!

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Model: Whitney Lawhon

Whitney works at one of my favorite restaurants in town, The Bit & Spur. One of the perks of living in such a small town is knowing the staff at all the local businesses.

While dining at the Bit the other night another employee suggested that I photograph Whitney. Well... I did!

This image is one of my favorites...

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Model: Lydia Rose Gooch

What a wonderful subject to photograph!

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Model: Yolanda Damon Harris

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: The Vaudevillian

I was asked recently how I handled it when my subject doesn't like their images.

Here are my thoughts...

The first time I experienced this situation, I was in complete bewilderment.
I assumed that the subject didn't like the images, because although they were a friend and I saw them daily, they never said one word about them. Not one word. Most people would at least lie and say they liked them. I got nothing. I didn't realize at the time that this was going to happen on a regular basis with many other subjects. I admit, those first few times, I took it very personal.

Because photography is just a hobby, my subjects are not paying clients. I couldn't deal with letting people down or trying to meet expectations. If they're dissatisfied, I have the luxury to say, 'You get what you pay for'. Of course, I wouldn't, but you get the point. I am very blunt now and lower their expectations from the get go by telling them beforehand that if they like the images, great... but they may not and I won't take it personally. I make them aware that what's most important, is that I LIKE THEM. Sounds so harsh, I know. Trust me, I prefer that they like the images, but I have lowered my expectations about that as well.

I think in my case being upfront really helps. Of course I realize I can only be this way, because my subjects have not hired me. Telling someone before the shoot that they may not like the images wouldn’t go over very well if they are paying you.

In the end, the only thing I do know is that I need a lot more experience photographing people to consider myself knowledgeable on this topic. Next month I may have a different way of handling it. Who knows. But judging by some of the comments I got when I last posted on this topic, it is nice to know that I am not the only one to deal with this. It would be interesting to know how others handle it when their subjects are dissatisfied.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Sunshine in Overalls

I received this message on my Facebook Page recently:

“I need to ask: Are you still doing shoots for no charge? I love when I am able to work for free and I grow more that way (the pressure is off) but in my quest to make money the fun has left my photography. I have a large portfolio but just can't make it in the business. I've kind of decided to take this year to shoot for fun. Everyone keeps telling me I need to charge and I'd like some money for new equipment... “

I responded that I am still a proud amateur and can’t ever imagine it any other way.
Indeed, everyone else knows best and tells me the same thing -
I NEED to start charging money.

WHY?

I’ve discussed this topic ad nauseum, so I won’t go down that path again. Instead I’d like to write about the perceived need to earn money from photography to justify purchasing new equipment and the fact that expensive gear rarely makes a person a better photographer.

I have a job that pays me money to support my hobby. I don’t feel any guilt whatsoever about using that money to purchase the necessary gear I need to take photos. That being said, at this point, if I were to purchase new gear, I would be wasting my money. I have everything I need to take the kind of photos I like. This includes my inexpensive AlienBee strobes, Paul C. Buff modifiers, Paul C. Buff triggers and my 5 yr. old 5d mk ll.

Would Profoto’s, Einstein’s, Pocket Wizards or the new Canon 5d mk lll be nice? Sure they would. Will they make me a better photographer at this point? In my opinion, no.

Mastering the interaction necessary to extract expression from my subject, in my opinion, is the only thing at this point that will help me take better portraits.
Expensive gear won’t help.

I will add that having a better understanding of light is extremely important and I have a long way to go.

But thankfully, Profoto’s aren't necessary!

I am not an expert on any topic... far from it! So keep in mind that these are just my opinions and not facts :)

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: I love this 'outtake' from my shoot with Zee.
A wonderful subject and I look forward to photographing her again!

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 40 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
Photoshop CS6Photo: Another image of the legendary performance painter, Norton Wisdom.
Once again, living in this tiny town of 500 people never ceases to amaze me. So lucky to have access to such amazing and inspiring people to photograph.

Yes, you HAVE seen this pose before... because it's the pose that I will most likely have every subject do... BECAUSE IT'S MY FAVORITE!

I NEVER  imagined myself saying this, but... I'm actually enjoying the shooting more than the retouching! Now with my new workflow, I am able to process an image in roughly 15 min.

Hooray!

Recently, I have cut my retouching down to the bare bones. Most of the time spent is devoted to color correcting the skin, which I do the bulk of in Lightroom. But thanks to Harry Limey on Flickr, his advice has saved me so much time in that department.

Here is my new Photoshop workflow:

Import the image into Photoshop after making initial adjustments in Lightroom.
The important setting in LR that Harry told me about, was using Camera Neutral (instead of the default Adobe Standard)
for the camera calibration. I was a little skeptical at first, but I swear by it now!

Once in Photoshop, the first thing I do is add a Selective Color adj. layer.
Under reds, I move the top slider (cyan) to the right to usually between 16 and 25.
This alone helps so much!

Next I will add a Hue/Sat adj. layer and reduce the saturation of the reds and yellows by -5 each, or wherever I think it looks best.
This step is optional, I don't always do it.

I will then merge all layers and use the Nik Software's (Ver. 3) Tonal Contrast Filter, to the highlights and midtones
and sometimes will reduce the saturation there a small amount, too.
This is wonderful for adding detail to the bright areas of the skin and just gives the image a really crisp detailed look...
just don't over do it, unless of course you like that... but I don't :)
Once back in PS, I will mask out the filter effect from the background.

Ok we're almost done!-
For the vignette, I merge all layers together again and then change the blend mode of this layer to Multiply.
I'll add a white mask and using a large soft feathered black brush, I paint on the mask to expose the subject.
I reduce the opacity to decrease the amount of vignette as necessary.

Unfortunately, that last step can cause gradient (banding) problems on the background.
I will often apply Imagenomics' Portraiture plugin to the background if there is banding or a weird texture/pattern that I don't want.
I make sure to uncheck the 'Skin' box when doing so.
A mask is applied to limit the plugin effect to just the background.

Lastly, I will duplicate the image and reduce the size to 2048px on the long side which is supposedly the best size for Facebook.
Then I will add sharpening with Nik Softwares' Sharpener Pro.
Again, I will apply a mask and limit the sharpening to just the subject and NOT the background.

There you have it!

Lighting info:
AlienBee B800 in med. octabox, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
AlienBee B800 in med. soft box behind camera, up high, for fill
AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
Photoshop CS6Photo: This pose makes everyone look like a movie star :)

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: I love this image, but I knew we could have done better. By the time we incorporated the bird, Trinity was tired and pooped out. I wanted something more in the way of facial expression, maybe just a slightly raised corner of the mouth. A learning experience for all nonetheless and we still got some wonderful images.

I love the bird. Just something about the contrast. I imagine it will get pretty old and boring, but until then, I'll keep trying to rock it. Just waiting for the perfect image to result. This one comes close.

Things I learned from this shoot:
-Clarify beforehand what side the subject parts their hair (if they do) for proper light placement. I always prefer to place the main light on the same side as the hair part

-Remind the subject to come well fed and hydrated!

-I don't like the chair turned in other positions (refers to images using the chair during this shoot)

-If the chair doesn't add to the image, it detracts. Incorporate the pose into the chair (refers to images using the chair during this shoot)

-I usually have my subjects take off jewelry, because I feel in most cases it detracts. However, I am finding that a lot of jewelry can sometimes add to the image (refers to images using jewelry during this shoot)

-NO NAIL POLISH!

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-70mm 'L' Lens
Photoshop CS6Photo: I learned something very valuable from this shoot. My subject was amazingly animated, a comedian, an actor, a contortionist... all rolled into one. My shoots are extremely controlled. I think my subjects are quite surprised by this fact. But there was no controlling this subject and as a result, I lost control of the shoot. I would've just preferred that we stuck to my game plan, but I'm not sure if that would have worked out better or not.

Oh well... Always a learning experience and this was a great one.
Glad we got an image that I like :)

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
Photoshop CS6Photo: Model: Sydney Riccella Kitzmiller

By now it is probably evident that I don't shoot couples. I mention this, because I was asked to do so recently and I cringed. I am not a fan of couples portraits. There may be a connection between the two subjects, but I think the connection with the photographer gets lost. It's challenging enough to extract the expression I'm looking for from ONE subject, let alone TWO.... at the same time! Too much work. I'm sure I could get a few okay ones, but you know how I feel about okay... BORING.

As I think about it, I realize that the couples portrait is for the couple. That's probably a large contributing factor why I don't like taking them. My portraits are for me, not the subject. I don't expect my subject to like the result. Of course it is flattering if they do, but I think more often than not, they don't. Probably because their pose and expression in the finished image is so far from how they thought it felt like when they were in front of the camera. I'm not really sure, I'm just guessing. I try to make it clear that I am not interested in making them look good. I am interested in making them look INTERESTING.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Have I mentioned that many of my subjects do not like the images I've taken of them? It's coming back to me that I may have mentioned it quite recently. Sorry if I sound like a broken record. I'll say it again regardless, because I find the topic interesting. Not that it should come as a surprise. It's common knowledge that humans are hyper critical of themselves, especially when it comes to appearance. I'll even include myself in this group. In my experience, it's a rare person that thinks they look good in photos. This is just one of the reasons why I could never take portraits for money. I know for a fact that at least half my 'customers' would be dissatisfied. I've finally accepted this fact and can now say with complete confidence that I no longer care and do not take it personally. Thank goodness! In my opinion, I've made my subjects look like superstars, but it's not my fault if they don't share that opinion.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Cloaked in Beauty

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: My husband Fred... my favorite subject!

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Happy New Year

Model: Sydney Riccella Kitzmiller

While searching for poses to use with my subjects, I came across advertisements for jewelry designer David Yurman. I instantly became obsessed with the B&W photography, the models and the incorporation of hands in the images. Obviously, the hands are adorned with rings, it is an ad after all. Even though I do not design and sell jewelry, I just love hands and make every effort to include them in my own images. Shortly after seeing those ads, I discovered German photographer Peter Lindbergh, who coincidently shot those images for the Yurman campaign that I love so much. I am so inspired by Peter's work. He also is a filmmaker and I loved watching one of his short films, 'Models, The Film'. So interesting to watch the super models of 1991 - Naomi Campbell, Stephanie Seymour, Cindy Crawford, Linda Evangelista and Tatjana Patitz at work. Intoxicating...

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6Photo: Plotting

It was hard to choose between this and two other, similar images, but in the end, the more downward glance of this expression won out. I just love the subtle air of mischievousness.

I find that one of the most challenging aspects of a photo shoot is the tedious task of sorting through the images afterwards. Thankfully, this is getting much easier. Most importantly, I don't take as many images as I used to. I wait till I get what I'm looking for from my subject and shoot only when I do. If I don't like what I'm seeing, I change up the pose. I no longer waste frames, as that equals too much time editing out bad shots afterwards... and I am running out of patience with that nonsense. Do I miss shots? Yes... I do. On occasion, if I would have fired off a frame or two more, no telling I would have had a masterpiece. That is the chance I take and the price I pay.

The other reason culling through the images at the end is getting easier is that I know now with more confidence what I am looking for in the eyes. It is becoming more obvious, the difference between a blank empty stare and an intriguing expression. Previously, I would have settled for less, but now I throw away some very 'good' images.

Nothing bores me more than 'good'.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
Photoshop CS6Photo: Mobster

I love this series of images with Zach. He was such a natural subject in front of the camera. Not that this pose is a great example of looking natural... but that's my fault, not his. Just trying to be more creative with the chair. It goes without saying that some poses look better than others.

Repetition is key. I find it's the only technique that works for me. I have not repeated anything to do with taking photos, lighting, posing, working with people or even post processing enough, for any of those things to be considered second nature.

I will admit that it's getting easier, but I need A LOT more repetition until I can do this stuff blindfolded. At least I'm finally confident that it WILL happen. I won't give up now...

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
Photoshop CS6Photo: The Eyes Say It All

Would have preferred the head tilted a bit more, but I like the image nonetheless. The eyes tell the whole story. Although the mouth is obstructed, you can tell by the expression in the eyes that the mouth has a little smirk going. The dropped shoulder gives a little body language and I'm lovin' that, too. It's the small details. Paying attention to them all can be challenging... impossible at times, but crucial. It's those small details that all add up to make a huge difference.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
Photoshop CS6Photo: Wow... You would never guess that Zach is not an actor. I think from the looks of it, he should be :)

I met Zach roughly 5 years ago, shortly after his move to Zion. He didn't stay very long in the area and unfortunately I didn't have the opportunity to get to know him well. On his recent visit back to Zion, he stopped by the bike shop. Luck would have it that I happened to be working that day. I recognized him and instantly decided that I wanted to take his portrait.

I asked and he kindly obliged...

Zach took my instruction so well and I am very happy with the results. This shoot was a big confidence booster and I hope all my future subjects are as wonderful as Zach!

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
Photoshop CS6Photo: I had not really seen much of Camille since she was around 10 yrs. old and didn't know what to expect. Lucky for me, she was a wonderful subject to practice on.

This was a last minute shoot and Camille didn't have much wardrobe with her, so we had to improvise. I love the business man look and used it several times, but this is the first time with a female. I think she looks awesome and love the results!

Things I have learned from this shoot:
- Place the subject at a different angle to prevent obliterating the eyes with the soft box reflection.
- Props sometimes distract, but it's worth it to try
- Incorporating asymmetry into sitting poses is every bit as important as it is for standing poses. I forgot about this. I made sure on this shoot to have the subject drop a shoulder, just like I would if they were standing.
- I have a big problem always shooting lower than my subject, so I brought out the step stool and got up higher than I normally would. Hope this helped, but I haven't scrutinized all the images yet to see if it did.
- Regret not having subject mess up her hair more. Ask next time!

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-70mm 'L' Lens
Photoshop CS6Photo: Photo: Photo: Close To Heart

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 30 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-70mm 'L' Lens
Photoshop CS6Photo: Don't Move Or I'll Shoot!Photo: Wisdom In The House

Had the privilege to photograph the legendary performance painter Norton Wisdom in my studio yesterday. What a treat. Just another example of why it's important to always have your lights set up... 'just in case'. You never know what opportunity may pop up last minute! If I weren't all ready to go, I would have had only 5 min. preparation, sheesh!

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
Photoshop CS6Photo: Zee

By now, some people may be tiring of the look of my recent portraits with the simple lighting and dark charcoal background. I am still fine tuning the lighting and don't feel like I have mastered the look quite yet, but I am loving it more with each shoot I do. Maybe after I can set it up with my eyes closed, I will tire of it also, but there is just something about it that continues to draw me in. I am still conquering my fear of shadows but have aspirations to go darker in the near future. But as is, I really like how the subtlety of the soft spotlight on the background and the vignette (added in post) really emphasizes the subject.

I'm guessing some of my subjects poses will begin to look repetitive as well. I don't relish this, but it is somewhat necessary, as I continue on my quest to master posing. I have hundreds of images of interesting poses that I found on the Internet and printed out. I will usually choose around 15 or 20 of these images in advance (sitting and standing), that I think will be appropriate for my subject. If I get the impression that a subject will be nervous in front of the camera, I'll choose the more generic poses, that aren't too difficult to execute. I have been relying on these simpler poses a lot lately. Not a bad thing, as it gives me the opportunity to memorize them. Repetition will be my saving grace, so I will not have to rely on those printed pages forever, which is my goal.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 30 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
Photoshop CS6Photo: Caged

Such a fun shoot with Brian and his friend Scott, who are customers of our bike shop and were visiting from Canada.

This one is definitely a favorite from the shoot.

I love this chair so much. I agonized while searching, trying to find 'the right one'.
I felt confident that I had with this one...in the store, but you NEVER know till you see it in photos afterwards. Thank goodness I still love it! A rarity...

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera right, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
Photoshop CS6Photo: Trinity

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left, at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
Photoshop CS6Photo: Photo: The 3 Hat Trio

Lighting Info:
- 22" white socked beauty dish in front of subject, approx. head high
- Med soft box in front of me, on camera axis, for fill
- Subjects in front of wall painted 50% neutral gray

AlienBee 800 strobes
Paul C. Buff 22" white beauty dish w/sock
Paul C. Buff medium soft box
Canon 5d MkII
Canon 24-105 'L' LensPhoto: Composite - Background replaced in Photoshop.

Special shout out goes to the Flicker Strobist Group, who kindly gave advice a while back when I mentioned that I had committed myself... begrudgingly, to do a group shot.

This was not the group originally planned. That one, if I remember correctly, was supposed to be several more people. Thank god this shoot was only 3 people.

My biggest worry on this shoot, aside from not knowing what I am doing, was the major difference in heights. The tallest was 6' 5" and the shortest was 5' 9". I just thought it would be best to keep them on similar planes, not sure why, but it was very important to me. That's why I started them out sitting.

I had tested my lights on myself prior and everything was good to go when they arrived. I know a lot of people set things up after the subjects arrive, but I always set them up prior, and always use myself as a stand in. Of course, things don't always go as planned, do they ever? I am wearing black 99%, make that 100% of the time and my complexion would be considered fair. Not often the combination of my subjects. But I stick to my set up regardless. Not very smart, I know.

One day I will get the confidence up to do it on the fly. Until then, I get what I get and hopefully learn something when things don't turn out as planned/hoped.

I also used another set up, which I alternated between, in a different part of my studio. It's my go to set up with the beauty dish and the subjects against the grey wall.

After it was all said and done, I think I managed to get lucky. I am so grateful!
But I have decided as a result of all the stress involved, that I don't ever want to shoot people in multiples ever again. I much prefer the intimacy of an individual portrait.

That's the biggest lesson learned from this shoot!

Lighting Info:
- Med soft box on camera axis, angled slightly downwards and at head level
- Light was approx. 5' from subjects
- Thunder gray seamless background

Canon 5D Mkll
24-105 lens
AlienBee lights/modifiers
Paul C. Buff triggersPhoto: Model: Jason Peacher

This is 1st in a series of 5. It was next to impossible to narrow it down to just one favorite, they are all so awesome and I couldn't be happier with the results.

When a subject has a long beard, like Jason does here, it's as if they're bringing a 'special guest' with them to the studio. I felt an internal pressure to take advantage of the beard, as I may never have the opportunity to photograph one like it again. I pulled out all the stops, and prepped and planned more for this shoot than any other.

It began with scouring the internet for inspirational images. Next, I improvised on those images and figured out ways to incorporate the beard. I decided on some table props that I thought would help to enhance the 'story' of the image. Some props I had, some I borrowed and some I had to buy. I arranged the props, according to each theme (5 themes total), and photographed each set so that I could use it for reference during the real shoot. I picked out clothing pieces from my own wardrobe selection, that I thought would be appropriate for each theme. I then sat at the table and in front of a mirror, performed each pose and expression that I wanted the subject and his beard to do. I took meticulous notes for each pose and jotted them all down to reference during the shoot. I decided on 4 poses (plus variations) for each theme, with an outfit change every 2 poses.

It's such a pain in the arse figuring out all this stuff in advance. Unfortunately however, I'm not the fly by the seat of your pants type person and everything, down to the smallest detail, must be pre planned prior to leave nothing by chance. What can I say? Everybody's different and this is what works best for me.

I used to be embarrassed having to refer to all these printed off pieces of paper with notes, which I recite to my subject like, "Right arm high, on table. Left arm low, off table. Drop right shoulder. Right hand clenched, under chin. Head cocked towards light, long neck. Squint/bulge eyes. Tension in right hand. Purse lips." I also include in the notes, the expressions I want for each pose like, Who me?, perplexed, proud, smelling sh*t, pissed off, cocky, etc.

Yes, it's a lot of work, but worth it to me by saving time and adding confidence during the shoot, knowing what things will look like in advance.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background
- Paul C. Buff Cybercync triggers

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens (70mm)
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: Model: Jason Peacher

A break in the Baking series for some corn....

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background
- Paul C. Buff Cybercync triggers

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens (70mm)
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: Model - Lorin Whitaker

I've been doing a lot of themed shoots lately. While they're fun and a nice departure from the simpler portraits I normally do, they are just so much work and planning.

Sometimes, when I stumble upon a look that I like, I'll repeat the same look with different subjects. I find it usually takes a few times to really nail the look anyway and each subject has something different to offer. An example of the repeated theme is the red bird, which by the way, I feel I have not yet perfected. Now I want to repeat the mime theme. I love the white face make up so much. If I had my way, I'd do the mime look with every subject. It just makes the image look so theatrical. I also think it helps to relax the subject, because they can hide behind a 'mask'. I see myself overdoing it to the point where it will get old, but whatever... as long as I still like it :)

I had a shoot scheduled with Dan, a friend who is a local guide, but his trip went late and he had to reschedule at the last minute. I was all prepared and had made a few changes to my set up, so I was anxious to test it out. I gave Lorin a ring and he gladly obliged and came over with no notice. It is wonderful to have such a fun and animated subject to practice on, like Lorin.

The change to the set up was moving the table (again) onto the side of the studio with the Oliphant backdrop. I was going crazy, still having to shoot on the seamless paper when I had the most beautiful custom canvas backdrop just 2 yards away going unused. I tried previously to move the table, but was dissatisfied with the results. Not terrible, but I am a creature of habit and don't like to experiment or mess around with something that I already like. With this recent move of the table, I am determined to make it work. I will at least stick with the table on this side until I get a second Oliphant :)

Lorin was game for the mime look and as we were shooting, he asked if I ever used the wigs that are on display in the studio. I had been wanting to try a few again and now was the perfect opportunity.

And so, an image is born!

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at a hand painted #Oliphant canvas backdrop
- Paul C. Buff Cybercync triggers

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens (70mm)
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: Behind the scenes with Lorin Whitaker

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at a hand painted #OliphantStudio  custom canvas backdrop
- Paul C. Buff Cybercync triggers

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens (70mm)
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: Nate Whitlatch

The art of #portraiture  is making the subject look interesting. This is not always easy to do. Wardrobe, themes, props, posing and expression all play major roles.

On rare occasions, the subject doesn't need any of those things to make them look interesting. They just ARE interesting, all by themselves.

Nate is one of those rarities.

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at an #oliphantstudio  hand painted custom canvas backdrop

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: Model: Jason Peacher

So much you can do with a beard :)

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background
- Paul C. Buff Cybercync triggers

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens (70mm)
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: Pie Face

Model: Dan Snyder

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at a hand painted #Oliphant canvas backdrop
- Paul C. Buff Cybercync triggers

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens (70mm)
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: Pie Face

Model: Dan Snyder

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at a hand painted #Oliphant canvas backdrop
- Paul C. Buff Cybercync triggers

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens (70mm)
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: Oy Vey...

Model: Jason Peacher

I may continue the knitting as a series, love the red!

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background
- Paul C. Buff Cybercync triggers

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens (70mm)
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: Model: Yolanda Damon Harris

Playing catch up!
So many photos to post, so little time :(

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at Thunder Grey seamless background
- Paul C. Buff Cybercync triggers

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens (70mm)
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: Model: Kaila Smith

Kaila is a young lady from the 'hood who allowed me the honor to photograph her. Just a wonderful subject. I am sorry that she will be moving away for college in a couple of weeks, but I consider it a privilege to have had at least one shoot with her.

Best of luck to you, Kaila!

I've fallen behind in posting, not for lack of images, but rather due to lack of words.

Although I am guilty of posting images on more than a few occasions with nothing more in the description than the lighting info, I always feel terrible doing so. Probably because it is a disappointment when I see images I like from others with nothing more but the same.

I want to know more about the image, something... anything.

Being pressed for time and the fact that I am a terrible typer doesn't help, but I will try, and I apologize if I don't always succeed :)

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at a hand painted #OliphantStudios canvas backdrop
- Paul C. Buff Cybercync triggers

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens (70mm)
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: Photo: Model: Yolanda Damon Harris

One of my favorite subjects :)

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at a hand painted #OliphantStudios canvas backdrop
- Paul C. Buff Cybercync triggers

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens (70mm)
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: Thanks to +Peter Hurley, most of you know by now the importance of having your subjects squint their eyes.

Here is a side by side comparison to illustrate the impact that just a slight squint makes.

Model: Alex Pelton

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at a hand painted #OliphantStudios canvas backdrop
- Paul C. Buff Cybercync triggers

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens (70mm)
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: Renaissance Man

Model: Alex Pelton

Alex is the co-owner of one of my favorite restaurants in town, The Bit & Spur.

So next time you're in Zion, stop by, have dinner and say 'Hi' to the guy with the pony tail.

Make sure to tell him that he looks good in photos :)

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at a hand painted Oliphant Studio canvas backdrop
- Paul C. Buff Cybercync triggers

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens (70mm)
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: Such an honor to receive a visit from +Alex Koloskov and his wife +Genia Larionova!

I have been following them both since I started with studio lighting and I am constantly in awe of the stunning work that they produce.

It's always a special occasion to photograph another photographer and I am so honored that Alex allowed me the opportunity.

I wish them much success with their relocation to California and hope that one day our paths' cross again.

http://www.koloskov.com/portfolio/liquid/

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at a hand painted #Oliphantstudio  canvas backdrop
- Paul C. Buff Cybercync triggers

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens (70mm)
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapaglesPhoto: Model: Trinity Santiago

Trinity stopped by unexpectedly and we had some fun.
Turns out she likes chocolate :)

Lighting info:
- AlienBee B800 in med. soft box, camera left at aprox. 30 degree angle
- AlienBee B800 in med. octabox behind camera, up high, for fill
- AlienBee B800 with 40 degree grid behind subject, aimed at a hand painted #Oliphantstudio  canvas backdrop
- Paul C. Buff Cybercync triggers

Canon 5d Mkll
Canon 24-105mm 'L' Lens (70mm)
F/11 - 125th sec. - 125 ISO
Photoshop CS6

http://reginapaglesphotography.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reginapagles/
www.facebook.com/ReginaPagles
http://500px.com/reginapagles