Photo: Before taking out the camera and tripod from the backpack, it is a good idea to study the beach and how the waves interact with the rock and sand.  Choose one or two favorite places to emphasize, where the water motion grabs your eye.  Here, I liked the curl of the distant waves as well as how the water flows over the foreground rocks.  So I waited for both events to happen at the same time.  Eventually it did, but I had to be hit by a few waves while I lifted the tripod above my head.
Photo: In the winter, large waves break in portions of Haena Beach that are not protected by the coral reef. This one is over 10 feet tall from its base. They can get even larger during winter storms. After every shot, I had to run, as I planted the tripod right in the path of the waves to get the best shot.   These waves looked best just before the break, as the light penetrated through them.  The sand glistened and moved for just a second before drying up, so timing was important.
Photo: Hanalei is a small town on the north shore of the island. It has a 3-mile wide perfect crescent of sandy shoreline with the rainiest mountains in the world right behind them. While it rains about 100 inches per year in Hanalei, it rains about 600 inches per year on Mt. Waialeale, about 5 miles behind the peak on the left. Even with all of the rain, days are usually sunny in Hanalei with maybe 1-2 hours of rain mostly at night. The mountains in this image range from 3,000 to 5,000 feet in height. This shot can only be done with a medium tide and this effect only lasts for a few minutes before another wave moves in. Here, I attempted to show one of the waterfalls in the reflection. It took about 15 minutes of fiddling around before I finally got it right. All these elements combine to create a thickness to the atmosphere that makes me feel like I'm right back on the beach every time I view this image.
Photo: The Hanalei Pier points directly towards the mountains often referred to as "Bali Hai."   It refers to a song written by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II from the musical South Pacific. This area resembles the island of Tioman, which is the original Bali Hai.  With the sun rising behind the camera, openings in the clouds allowed the light to filter into the clouds and illuminate the mountains on the opposite side of Hanalei Bay.  Within 10 minutes the rain came in and this low warm light was gone for the day, replaced later by the bright light of mid-day.   I used a long exposure to show the motion in the clouds.  Also, the long exposure time smoothed out the water and simplified the image.  That enhanced the effect of light hitting the posts of the pier.
Photo: I wanted to create a surreal image that showed the interesting colors and detail under the Hanalei pier. A long exposure softened the waves which occasionally brushed up against the top part of the concrete in this image. I had to abort my 30 second planned exposure several times and run away from larger waves, until I had a good long period of smaller waves.  I like the symmetry underneath piers, so I always try to capture it if I can.
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Patrick Smith
Public
Hanalei is a small town on the north shore of the island. It has a 3-mile wide perfect crescent of sandy shoreline with the rainiest mountains in the world right behind them. While it rains about 100 inches per year in Hanalei, it rains about 600 inches per year on Mt. Waialeale, about 5 miles behind the peak on the left. Even with all of the rain, days are usually sunny in Hanalei with maybe 1-2 hours of rain mostly at night. The mountains in this image range from 3,000 to 5,000 feet in height. This shot can only be done with a medium tide and this effect only lasts for a few minutes before another wave moves in. Here, I attempted to show one of the waterfalls in the reflection. It took about 15 minutes of fiddling around before I finally got it right. All these elements combine to create a thickness to the atmosphere that makes me feel like I'm right back on the beach every time I view this image.
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