140 Photos - Jun 25, 2013
Photo: The Haiku Society of America national quarterly meeting at the Wing Luke Asian Museum in Seattle was the same day as Seattle's annual Rock and Roll Marathon. Here are Michelle Schaefer and Tanya McDonald watching a bit of the marathon before our meeting began at 10:00 am.Photo: Tanya McDonald and Michelle Schaefer watching the Seattle Rock and Roll Marathon before our haiku meeting starts.Photo: The Rock and Roll Marathon passed by King Street Station in Seattle.Photo: As you can see, it was great weather for Seattle's Rock and Roll Marathon. Too bad we had to be indoors for our haiku meeting all day! That's Tanya McDonald and Michelle Schaefer on the right.Photo: Just think — all these runners could have come to the haiku meeting instead!Photo: Here we are gathered in front of the Wing Luke Asian Museum in Seattle, just before it opened.Photo: Carmen Sterba signing in for our meeting, outside the Tateuchi Theatre at the Wing Luke Asian Museum.Photo: Angela Terry, Marilyn Sandall (facing away), and Carmen Sterba at the registration table.Photo: Angela Terry, Marilyn Sandall, and Carmen Sterba signing in and picking up copies of the day's schedule.Photo: Gathering with haiku friends inside the Tateuchi Theatre. Left to right are Carole Slesnick, Johnny Baranski, David Lanoue (facing away), Tanya McDonald, Terran Campbell (facing away), and Michelle Schaefer. In the background you can see some of the many haiga on display.Photo: Thanks to the Haiga Adventure Study Group, part of the Puget Sound Sumi Artists, for providing a wonderful exhibit of haiga, mostly featuring haiku by Haiku Northwest founder Francine Porad.Photo: On display with the haiga was the T-shirt for the Seward Park Torii contest (with haiku contest winners on the back).Photo: More haiga on display.Photo: More haiga and one of our tables used for sharing freebies. It accumulated a lot more material later in the morning.Photo: Nice to see old haiku friends, and to make a few new ones!Photo: More of the haiga on display.Photo: Two of Francine Porad's haiku featured in haiga at the front of our meeting room.Photo: We'll soon start our day of haiku events at the Wing Luke Museum.Photo: More chatting and socializing among haiku friends.Photo: Marilyn Sandall takes a look at two of Francine Porad's haiku featured in haiga.Photo: One of Francine Porad's haiku in a haiga:

open house . . .
my children, their children
joy is my middle namePhoto: Another one of Francine Porad's haiku in a haiga:

poolside, we chat
about reincarnation;
no longer strangersPhoto: Several of the haiga used the same poems by Francine Porad:

poolside, we chat 
about reincarnation; 
no longer strangersPhoto: Yet another one of Francine Porad's poems in a haiga: 

husband spellbound—
his wife's version
of their courtshipPhoto: Another haiga on display.Photo: A lovely colour haiga on display.Photo: Yet another haiga using Francine Porad's haiku: 

poolside, we chat 
about reincarnation; 
no longer strangersPhoto: Such variety and creativity in the haiga that used the same haiku by Francine Porad:

poolside, we chat 
about reincarnation; 
no longer strangersPhoto: I think this was my favourite haiga in the display, featuring another poem by Francine Porad:

twilight deepens—
the wordless things
I knowPhoto: Close-up of a haiga featuring a poem by Francine Porad: 

twilight deepens— 
the wordless things 
I knowPhoto: A haiga by Dorothy Matthews, who organized the haiga display for us. Thank you, Dorothy!Photo: The poem by Francine Porad in this haiga:

I raise my head
from his chest, heartbeats
to cricketsPhoto: Close-up of a haiga featuring a poem by Francine Porad:

I raise my head 
from his chest, heartbeats 
to cricketsPhoto: Yet another haiga on display.Photo: Signs welcoming people into our meeting room, including the day's schedule (click to zoom in), or visit https://sites.google.com/site/haikunorthwest/meetings-1/hsa-national-meeting-2013 to read the schedule.Photo: Johnny Baranski shares a laugh with Angela Terry.Photo: More socializing before we begin our day's events.Photo: After a welcome led by Michael Dylan Welch, we had a round of haiku reading by everyone present, followed by a reading of the winners from the Seward Park Torii Project's haiku contest, judged by Michael Dylan Welch. Three of the winners were present to read their poems: Erica Howard, Angela Terry, and first-place winner David Berger. Then it was time for David Lanoue, president of the Haiku Society of America, to give his presentation (shown here).Photo: David Lanoue spoke on what we can learn from Issa, followed by a "Write Like Issa" workshop.Photo: David Lanoue giving his presentation on the haiku poet Issa.Photo: David Lanoue giving his presentation on the haiku poet Issa to an attentive audience.Photo: David Lanoue giving his presentation on the haiku poet Issa.Photo: David Lanoue, president of the Haiku Society of America.Photo: David Lanoue, president of the Haiku Society of America.Photo: After our workshop, it was time to head to the Green Leaf Vietnamese restaurant across the street for lunch. Here are Carole Slesnick and Jeff Robbins heading in.Photo: We had the restaurant's upstairs room pretty much to ourselves. In the foreground are William Scott Galasso, Tanya McDonald, David Berger, and Terran Campbell.Photo: Clockwise from the left are Joan Stamm, Gwen Stamm, Ida Freilinger, Marilyn Sandall, Angela Terry, Ruth Yarrow (hidden), Dianne Garcia, Connie Hutchison, and Dorothy Matthews (facing away).Photo: Clockwise from the lower left are Erica Howard, Carmen Sterba (facing away), David Lanoue, Jeff Robbins, Roy Kindelberger, and Johnny Baranski.Photo: Enjoying lunch together at the Green Leaf Vietnamese restaurant.Photo: Time to head back to our meeting room, where plenty of snacks were available all day. Thanks to Angela Terry, Dianne Garcia, and Tanya McDonald for helping with snacks.Photo: Taking a look at the freebie table: David Berger, Erica Howard, Ida Freilinger, and Dorothy Matthews.Photo: Our first afternoon session featured Basho researcher Jeff Robbins, visiting from Japan, talking about how Basho is more personal than many critics give him credit for.Photo: Jeff Robbins giving his presentation on Basho.Photo: Jeff Robbins giving his presentation on Basho.Photo: Jeff Robbins giving his presentation on Basho. We had about 25 to 30 people in attendance.Photo: Jeff Robbins giving his presentation on Basho.Photo: Our next presenter was David Patneaude, whose presentation, "Haiku Poems—Small Scenes in a Larger Life" explored the role of haiku in his young adult novel Thin Wood Walls. His novel, about the relocation of Japanese Americans in World War II, is set in Seattle.Photo: David Patneaude starts his presentation about the role of haiku used in his novel. The poems in the book were "written" by one of the main characters.Photo: David Patneaude's presentation generated a short but lively discussion on the injustices of Japanese American relocation during World War II.Photo: David Patneaude did some of the research for his novel at the Wing Luke Museum.Photo: Voski Sprague poses with two of her haiga featuring poems by Francine Porad.Photo: In the afternoon we had an hour break to explore the Wing Luke Asian Museum. This is an upstairs atrium.Photo: At the Wing Luke Asian Museum.Photo: At the Wing Luke Asian Museum.Photo: In one of the exhibit rooms at the Wing Luke Asian Museum: Jeff Robbins, Carole Slesnick, and Carmen Sterba.Photo: An exhibit on the relocation of Japanese Americans during World War II.Photo: Viewing more exhibits: Roy Kindelberger, Ida Freilinger, and Johnny BaranskI (facing away).Photo: Photo: Photo: Another upstairs atrium at the Wing Luke Museum.Photo: Gathering again for our next afternoon presentation.Photo: Johnny Baranski.Photo: Voski Sprague, Fumiko Kimura, and Dorothy Matthews were three of the artists featured in the haiga display. Voski and Fumiko cofounded the Puget Sound Sumi Artists group in 1986.Photo: David Lanoue.Photo: Connie Hutchison and Ida Freilinger enjoying snacks.Photo: Jeff Robbins begins his second presentation of the afternoon, “Basho: Extant vs. Translated,” on the surprising amount of Basho's work that is not widely translated. Jeff's presentation included a very informative handout.Photo: David Lanoue joined us from new Orleans and Carole Slesnick visited from Bellingham.Photo: Planning the reading from the 25th anniversary Haiku Northwest anthology are Dianne Garcia, Tanya McDonald, Angela Terry, and Connie Hutchison.Photo: Fumiko Kimura checks out the books on display on our book table. In the foreground is a front-page Seattle Times newspaper story on the Seward Park Torii project, including the top three winners in a haiku contest they ran (I served as judge).Photo: Jeff Robbins and David Berger at the freebie table, now with a lot more haiku sheets and other handouts.Photo: Michael Dylan Welch served as MC for the day.Photo: Michael Dylan Welch.Photo: Michael Dylan Welch begins his presentation.Photo: Michael Dylan Welch's presentation focused on the poetry of Haiku Northwest founder Francine Porad.Photo: Michael Dylan Welch.Photo: Michael Dylan Welch.Photo: Photo: Michael Dylan Welch. After this presentation was a reading from the upcoming Haiku Northwest 25th anniversary anthology, "No Longer Strangers" (unfortunately, no photos available of this reading).Photo: After our last presentations of the day at the Wing Luke museum, we migrated to Sun Ya Chinese restaurant nearby. Left to right are Tanya McDonald, Russ McDonald, Angela Terry, Marilyn Sandall, Connie Hutchison, Ida Freilinger, and Roy Kindelberger.Photo: Tanya McDonald, Russ McDonald, Angela Terry, Marilyn Sandall, Connie Hutchison, Ida Freilinger, Roy Kindelberger, and Carole Slesnick.Photo: Ida Freilinger, Roy Kindelberger, Carole Slesnick, Johnny Baranski, Erica Howard, Jeff Robbins, and David Lanoue.Photo: Connie Hutchison, Ida Freilinger, Roy Kindelberger, and Carole Slesnick (hidden).Photo: Marilyn Sandall and Connie Hutchison.Photo: Johnny Baranski, Erica Howard, Jeff Robbins, and David Lanoue. What a great day we'd had together today, with another day sharing haiku at the Seattle Japanese Garden tomorrow.Photo: Ida Freilinger (facing away), Darcie Gurley, Erica Howard, and Carole Slesnick at the Seattle Japanese Garden on June 23, 2013.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Ida Freilinger.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Ida Freilinger pens a poem.Photo: Ida Freilinger and Erica Howard.Photo: Ida Freilinger writes in her haiku notebook.Photo: Photo: David Berger and Darcie Gurley on the moonviewing platform.Photo: David Berger and Darcie Gurley.Photo: Ida Freilinger and Erica Howard.Photo: Koi at the moonviewing platform.Photo: Feeding the koi.Photo: Feeding the koi.Photo: The koi knew we had koi food!Photo: Photo: Photo: Carole Slesnick enjoys the pond at the Seattle Japanese Garden.Photo: David Berger on the moonviewing bridge.Photo: Photo: Photo: David Berger, Ida Frielinger, and Darcie Gurley enjoying the garden, and probably a haiku moment or two.Photo: Darcie Gurley. A gentle and intermittent rain made things interesting.Photo: Darcie Gurley.Photo: Ida Frielinger and David Berger.Photo: Photo: We gathered in the azumaya to write a six-person rengay together, on the theme of circles. Left to right are David Berger, Ida Frielinger, Carole Slesnick, Darcie Gurley, and Erica Howard.Photo: Photo: Photo: Our time together is nearly over. Darcie Gurley, Ida Frielinger, David Berger, and Carole Slesnick.Photo: Darcie Gurley, Ida Frielinger, David Berger, Erica Howard, and Carole Slesnick heading out of the garden.Photo: Photo: We had the garden mostly to ourselves.Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Photo: Carole Slesnick on one of the garden paths, on our way out after a wonderful weekend of sharing haiku.