43 Photos - Jun 13, 2012
Photo: Monarch feeding on tropical milkweed.Photo: A report from Butterflies LIVE, from Grant Howell, the Garden's butterfly curator: the Atala Hairstreak, within minutes of landing on her host plant, the cycad "coontie", started laying eggs! This is a butterfly native to Florida that was almost extinct at one time. The Atala Hairstreak features beautiful incandescent blue dots on her wings. This is a photo of Atala Hairstreak (Eumaeus atala) resting on a leaf -- not the host plant Coontie. Photo by Garrett McLeesPhoto: Red Postman (Heliconius erato) feeding on latana. Their bright red/orange color signifies that they would taste bad to a predator (mostly birds).Photo: A male Great Mormon butterfly fluttering its wings.Photo: The Red Postman (Heliconius erato) is distantly related to the postman butterfly (Heliconius melpomene). Both are known as Longwings.Photo: The Postman butterfly (Heliconius melpomene) -- best know for it's rhythmic fluttering or flying gait that seems like an off-beat drum.Photo: Red Postman (Heliconius erato)Photo: Do you see the little white dot on the leaf of the tropical milkweed?! That's a Monarch egg!Photo: The Paper Kite (Idea leuconoe) butterfly is native to Asia. Don Williamson PhotographyPhoto: Photo: This postman butterfly is getting ready for flight! Photo by Don Williamson PhotographyPhoto: Butterflies are cold-blooded creatures and need to bask in the sun before flight. They are most active on sunny warm days (75-90 degrees) because they don't have to spend as much time basking, they are already warm. Photo by Don Williamson PhotographyPhoto: The male Great Mormon (papilio memnon) butterfly, females are red, black. & gray. Males are blue or black. photo by Don Williamson PhotographyPhoto: The proboscis is like a straw that's attached! Photo by Don Williamson PhotographyPhoto: The Paper Kite (Idea leuconoe) butterfly is native to Asia. Don Williamson PhotographyPhoto: Photo: Photo: A Banded Peacock (Papilio palinurus) butterfly from Asia, photo by Don Williamson PhotographyPhoto: Twins! Photo by Don Williamson PhotographyPhoto: Oh man. Did you see those eyes!? This is a Great Southern White (Ascia monuste)

Photo by Don Williamson PhotographyPhoto: The female Great Morman (papilio memnon) butterfly, females are red, black. & gray. Males are blue or black. photo by Don Williamson PhotographyPhoto: Meet the newest member of our Butterflies LIVE family -- the African moon moth, otherwise known as Argema mimosae. This one emerged yesterday & resembles the better known Luna moth, but with crossed "tails". Except for the "scary eyes" on its wings, the moth blends in with green surrounding foliage in nature.Photo: A Julia butterfly (Dryas iulia). Check out her eyes! Photo by Don Williamson PhotographyPhoto: Photo: That's a longwing if I ever saw one! Longwings are known for their long wings. This one is Tiger Longwing (Heliconius hecale). Photo by Don Williamson PhotographyPhoto: Great egg-fly butterfly (female)Photo: Photo: Great egg-fly butterfly (male)Photo: Great egg-fly butterfly (male) - EditPhoto: Photo: You can tell this butterfly is a swallowtail because of the shape of its tail. The tails break off easily -- so you have to be very careful. Birds are the no. 1 predator of butterflies in nature. The tail breaks off when a bird is trying to eat the swallowtail, saving the butterfly, who can still manage to flit away. Photo by Don Williamson PhotographyPhoto: Black-tipped diadem from AfricaPhoto: Zebra longwingPhoto: Dark blue tiger butterflyPhoto: Photo: Photo: Mocker Swallowtail from AfricaPhoto: Photo: Photo: Rothschild silk moth, they don't have any mouth parts so they can't eat in this stage. They are from Central America & tropical South America.Photo: Grecian ShoemakerPhoto: Photo: Dark blue tiger butterfly and a paper kite.