Photo: The rough hands of an Afghan child, at the Sadat Ltd. Brick factory, where some children work from 8am to 5 pm daily, seen on May 14, 2010 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Child labor is common at the brick factories where the parents work as laborers, desperate to make more money enlisting their children to help doing the easy jobs. (Majid Saeedi/Getty Images)
Photo: Czoton, 7, works at a balloon factory on the outskirts of Dhaka, Bangladesh, on November 23, 2009. About 20 children are employed by the factory and most of them work for 12 hours a day. (Reuters/Andrew Biraj)
Photo: A boy works at a coal depot on April 16, 2011 near Lad Rymbai, in the district of Jaintia Hills, India. Local schools in the area, providing free tuition, find it difficult to convince parents of the benefits of education, as children are seen as sources of income. The lure of the mines is stronger than that of the classroom. The Jaintia hills, located in India's far North East state of Meghalaya, miners descend to great depths on slippery, rickety wooden ladders. Children and adults squeeze into rat hole like tunnels in thousands of privately owned and unregulated mines, extracting coal with their hands or primitive tools and no safety equipment. (Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Photo: A young Indian bonded child laborer gives details to a police officer at the district magistrates office after being rescued during a raid by workers from Bachpan Bachao Andolan or Save the Childhood Movement, at a garment factory in New Delhi, India, on June 12, 2012. Police raids on factories in the Indian capital revealed dozens of migrant kids hard at work, despite laws against child labor. Police rounded up 26 children from three textiles factories and a metal processing plant, but dozens more are believed to have escaped. Those captured had all come to New Delhi from the states of Bihar and Uttar Pradesh. (AP Photo/Kevin Frayer)
Photo: Sixteen-year-old prostitute Maya waits for a customer inside her small room at Kandapara brothel in Tangail, a northeastern city of Bangladesh, on March 5, 2012. She earns about 300-500 Taka per day ($3.66- $6.11) serving around 15-20 customers every day. Maya's son Halim, a four-year-old child lives with her parents in another Barisal. She cannot save money for her child as she has debt and barely afford daily expenses. Maya is one of hundreds of mostly teenage sex workers living in a painful life of exploitation in Kandapara slum's brothel who take Oradexon , a steroid used by farmers to fatten their cattle, in order to gain weight and appear "healthier" and more attractive to clients. (Reuters/Andrew Biraj)
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The rough hands of an Afghan child, at the Sadat Ltd. Brick factory, where some children work from 8am to 5 pm daily, seen on May 14, 2010 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Child labor is common at the brick factories where the parents work as laborers, desperate to make more money enlisting their children to help doing the easy jobs. (Majid Saeedi/Getty Images)
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