211 Photos - Nov 13, 2010
Photo: Split Mask, 2014, Brenda Clews, 60" x 60", graphite, charcoal, India ink, acrylic, metal leaf on canvas. This is a night-time, indoor shot without a flash taken at my show, Poempaintings, at Urban Gallery in Toronto.Photo: Split Mask, Brenda Clews, 5'x5', mixed media on canvas. It is almost impossible to photograph under lights - the lines of the hair are dark like the shadows in the upper right, for instance. The photo is not too bad, but the painting is better weighted in reality.Photo: Split Mask, crop, 2014, Brenda Clews, mixed media on canvas.Photo: Split Mask, v.3 wip, Brenda Clews, 5'x5', mixed media.Photo: Photo: Photo: Split Mask, in-process, Brenda Clews, 5'x5', mixed media on canvas.Photo: Photo: Orange is the New Black, Drawing #4, 2013, Brenda Clews, 12" x 16", charcoal and pastels on Canson 98lb pastel paper.Photo: Sketch (unfinished), 12" x 16", charcoal and pastels on Canson 98lb pastel paper. While watching True Blood. I had to draw back from too much realism. Thinking to put in a turquoise sky and light grey under her and words, not sure what words, a poem, a series of utterances.Photo: Untitled, Brenda Clews, 18" x 21", charcoal and pastels on Strathmore 80lb drawing paper.Photo: Orange is the New Black, Drawing #3 (final), 2013, Brenda Clews, 15" x 11", graphite and pastel on 130lb archival paper.Photo: Orange is the New Black, Drawing #3 (earlier version), 2013, Brenda Clews, 15" x 11", graphite and pastel on 130lb archival paper.Photo: Orange is the New Black, Drawing #2 (final), 2013, Brenda Clews, 15" x 11", graphite and pastel on 130lb archival paper.Photo: A little drawing while I was watching Netflix's new series, Orange is the New Black. There is a unintentional resemblance to Piper Chapman, the main actor in the series, as she appears in the first 3 episodes (freaked out is the word). Seriously, I began a landscape, drawing in some lines for bark that became her hair. Le sigh.  In a little Moleskine notebook, 7.5" x 10", nice for writing and drawing and fits in my purse.Photo: '...when she finished her drink, she got up and left.' 2013, Brenda Clews, 7.5" x 10", graphite, charcoal and watercolours, Moleskine Notebook. Sketch done at Future Bakery in Toronto on evening of Sat July 13th (she didn't know she was being sketched).Photo: Ink Sketch while reading Neil Gaiman's 'Ocean at the End of the Lane,' Brenda Clews, 2013, 8" x 10", India ink, in a Premium C.D. Japanese Notebook (the paper is like silk).Photo: Beautiful & Damned - Who Is Who?, Brenda Clews, 2013, 16" x 10", graphite and ink, in a Premium C.D. Japanese Notebook (the paper is like silk).Photo: Beautiful & Damned - Who Is Who? (detail), Brenda Clews, 2013, 16" x 10", graphite and ink, in a Premium C.D. Japanese Notebook (the paper is like silk).Photo: Untitled, Brenda Clews, 2013, 8" x 10", graphite and ink, in a Premium C.D. Japanese Notebook (the paper is like silk)Photo: Untitled, Brenda Clews, 2013, 8" x 10", graphite and ink, in a Premium C.D. Japanese Notebook (the paper is like silk)Photo: 'For decisions and revisions which a minute will reverse,' a line from TS Eliot's, "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," 2013, 8" x 10", graphite and ink, in a Premium C.D. Japanese Notebook (the paper is like silk).

Then Dean R. Vincent has offered an even better line, "And so it stays just at the edge of vision/a small unfocused blur, a standing chill/that slows each impulse down to indecision." Larkin, 'Aubade.'Photo: 'For decisions and revisions which a minute will reverse,' a line from TS Eliot's, "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," 2013, 8" x 10", graphite and ink, in a Premium C.D. Japanese Notebook (the paper is like silk).

Then Dean R. Vincent has offered an even better line, "And so it stays just at the edge of vision/a small unfocused blur, a standing chill/that slows each impulse down to indecision." Larkin, 'Aubade.'Photo: 'A Selection of Poempaintings,' Brenda Clews, art show at Q Space, May 15 - June 15 2013.Photo: Photo: Photo: Invitation for Art Show, 'a selection of poempaintings' @ Q Space, 382 College St., Toronto, May 15 - June 15, 2013Photo: Photo: Charcoal Poems, 2013, Brenda Clews, 5' x 5', charcoal and oils on canvas.Photo: Untitled2, 6th wash, Brenda Clews, 2013, daylight photo, 24" x 30", inks and oils on stretched canvas.Photo: Untitled2, 4th wash, Brenda Clews, 2013, daylight photo, 24" x 30", inks and oils on stretched canvas.Photo: Untitled2, 3rd wash with poem, daylight photo, Brenda Clews, 2013, 24" x 30", ink and oils on stretched canvas.Photo: Untitled4, 1st wash, nighttime shot, Brenda Clews, 2013. 24" x 30", oil on stretched canvas.Photo: Untitled2, 2nd wash with lettering, daylight photo, Brenda Clews, 2013, 24" x 30", ink and oils on stretched canvas.Photo: Untitled2, 2nd wash, nighttime shot, Brenda Clews, 2013. 24" x 30" oil on stretched canvas.Photo: Untitled1, 3rd wash, Brenda Clews, 24" x 30", oils on stretched canvas (daytime shot, colours good, but still wet)Photo: Untitled3, 2nd wash, sunlight photo, 24" x 30", oils on stretched canvasPhoto: Untitled1, Untitled2, and Untitled3, 24" x 30", oils on stretched canvasPhoto: Untitled3, 1st wash, 24" x 30", oils on stretched canvasPhoto: Untitled2, sketch with contrast filter, 24" x 30", graphite on stretched canvasPhoto: Untitled2, sketch slightly underexposed, 24" x 30", graphite on stretched canvasPhoto: Untitled2, sketch, 24" x 30", graphite on stretched canvasPhoto: Untitled2, unfinished sketch, 24" x 30", graphite on stretched canvasPhoto: Untitled, 2nd wash, 24" x 30", oils on stretched canvas (daytime shot, colours good)Photo: 2nd wash, 24" x 30", oils on stretched canvas (nighttime shot, not so good for whiteness or colour)Photo: 1st wash, 24" x 30", oils on stretched canvasPhoto: The Poet Who Is Either Silenced Or Speaking Fire, 2013, Brenda Clews, 8.5" x 11", mixed media on 130lb archival paper.Photo: 'She, transparent to the sun,' 8.5" x 11", conte, chalk, pastel, art pen on Pentalic neutral pH 25% cotton 130 lb drawing paper.Photo: 'She, transparent to the sun,' Brenda Clews, 2013Photo: Detail of Untitled Unfinished Drawing, 2013, Brenda Clews, 28.5cm x 42cm, 11 1/4" x 16 1/2", graphite, India ink, copper, silver and gold leaf in a Moleskine A3 Sketchbook.

Blog post on the developing drawing: http://brendaclews.blogspot.ca/2013/02/detail-of-untitled-unfinished-drawing.htmlPhoto: Pensive Woman, 2013, Brenda Clews, 28.5cm x 42cm, 11 1/4" x 16 1/2", graphite, conte, charcoal, pastel, coloured pencil in a Moleskine A3 Sketchbook.Photo: Photo: the poets are coming, 2013, Brenda Clews, 9"x 12", 22.9cm x 30.5cm, art pens on 80lb archival Strathmore drawing paperPhoto: A Woman in a Sketchbook, 2013, Brenda Clews, 6" x 6.5", charcoal, conte crayon in Moleskine A3 sketchbook.Photo: Pencil, in-progress, Brenda Clews, Moleskine sketchbook.Photo: Illuminata, 2013, Brenda Clews, 28.5cm x 42cm, 11 1/4" x 16 1/2", graphite, India ink, copper, silver and gold leaf in a Moleskine A3 Sketchbook.Photo: Illuminata-detail, 2013, Brenda Clews, 28.5cm x 42cm, 11 1/4" x 16 1/2", graphite, India ink, copper, silver and gold leaf in a Moleskine A3 Sketchbook.Photo: Illuminata, 2013, Brenda Clews, 28.5cm x 42cm, 11 1/4" x 16 1/2", graphite, India ink, copper, silver and gold leaf in a Moleskine A3 Sketchbook.Photo: Mirrorless Self-Portrait Series, sketch 1Final, 28.5cm x 42cm, 11 1/4" x 16 1/2", graphite, watercolour pencils, Cretacolor aquastics, copper leaf in a Moleskine A3 Sketchbook.Photo: Mirrorless Self-Portrait Series, sketch 1 final -detail, 28.5cm x 42cm, 11 1/4" x 16 1/2", graphite, watercolour pencils, Cretacolor aquastics, copper leaf in a Moleskine A3 Sketchbook.Photo: Mirrorless Self-Portrait Series, sketch 1ca, 28.5cm x 42cm, 11 1/4" x 16 1/2", graphite, watercolour pencils, Cretacolor aquastics, copper leaf in a Moleskine A3 Sketchbook.Photo: Mirrorless Self-Portrait Series, sketch 1c, 28.5cm x 42cm, 11 1/4" x 16 1/2", graphite, watercolour pencils, Cretacolor aquastics, copper leaf in a Moleskine A3 Sketchbook.Photo: Mirrorless Self-Portrait Series, sketch 1, 28.5cm x 42cm, 11 1/4" x 16 1/2", graphite, watercolour pencils, Cretacolor aquastics, copper leaf in a Moleskine A3 Sketchbook.Photo: Mirrorless Self-Portrait Series, sketch 1-detail, 28.5cm x 42cm, 11 1/4" x 16 1/2", graphite, watercolour pencils, Cretacolor aquastics, copper leaf in a Moleskine A3 Sketchbook.Photo: 'The Lady and Her Skeleton,' 2012, 15" x 11", charcoal, Cretacolor water-soluble oil pastels, India ink on Pentalic archival 25% cotton 130lb paper. (A gorgeous pale cream paper, percentage of sale donated to the American Wildlife Foundation.)Photo: 'The Lady and Her Skeleton,' detail (photograph taken at night under daylight bulbs), 2012, 15" x 11", charcoal, Cretacolor water-soluble oil pastels, India ink on Pentalic archival 25% cotton 130lb paper. (A gorgeous pale cream paper, percentage of sale donated to the American Wildlife Foundation.)Photo: Ink Ocean, 2010, Brenda Clews, 13" x 16", India ink on archival paper. A prose poem on the Gulf Oil Spill emerged from this drawing. The poem was revised in 2012, and there is a video of me reading/performing it live: http://youtu.be/w4Xs2dIt2m4Photo: Tentative Ghost Under a Green Moon, 2012, Brenda Clews, Charcoal, India and acrylic inks, Moleskine Folio Sketchbook A4, 12" x 18", 21cm x 29.7cm.Photo: One of the Walking Narratives, 2012, Brenda Clews, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", graphite, India and acrylic inks in a Moleskine journal.

Written into the drawing:

CINDERBLOCKS OF TIME
DON'T WAIT FOR ME

moments
redeem
themselves

baby
you are
a walking
NARRATIVE

OIL
MAN
OIL WOMAN
OILMANOILW
OMAN OIL MA
N OIL WO
MANOILWOMA
NOILMANOIL
WOMANOILMAN
OILMANOIL

always there
should be
reeds blowing
in the
windPhoto: Paris Black on Nuit Blanche, 29 Sep 2012, Brenda Clews, 12" x 16", charcoal, acrylic, water-soluble oil pastels, triple-primed canvas sheet.Photo: Paris Black on Nuit Blanche, detail, 29 Sep 2012, Brenda Clews, 12" x 16", charcoal, acrylic, water-soluble oil pastels, triple-primed canvas sheet.Photo: Paris Black on Nuit Blanche, 29 Sep 2012, initial sketch, Brenda Clews, 12" x 16", charcoal, water-soluble oil pastels, triple-primed canvas sheet.Photo: "A Palmistry, a Psalm", 2012, Brenda Clews,18" x 24", charcoal, oils, oil pastels, oil sticks on triple-primed cotton canvas sheet.Photo: Exile, 2012, Brenda Clews,18" x 24", oils, India and acrylic inks on triple-primed cotton canvas sheet.Photo: "A Palmistry (in process)", 2012, Brenda Clews,18" x 24", charcoal, oils, oil pastels, oil sticks on triple-primed cotton canvas sheet.Photo: "A Palmistry (in process)", 2012, Brenda Clews,18" x 24", charcoal, oils, oil pastels, oil sticks on triple-primed cotton canvas sheet.Photo: "A Palmistry (in process)", 2012, Brenda Clews,18" x 24", charcoal, oils, oil pastels, oil sticks on triple-primed cotton canvas sheet.Photo: Women Looking Off Frame, 2012, Brenda Clews, 18" x 24", 56cm x 40.5cm, charcoal on triple-primed cotton canvas sheet.Photo: Women Looking Off Frame (inverted), 2012, Brenda Clews, 18" x 24", 56cm x 40.5cm, charcoal on triple-primed cotton canvas sheet.

Same as previous charcoal sketch, but inverted, which I do rather like.Photo: Cherry Blossoms in Storms, 2012, Brenda Clews, 22" x 16", 56cm x 40.5cm, charcoal on triple-primed cotton canvas sheet.  Where I'm at today. Fighting off, well stuff of all sorts - the kind that tries to silence you - doing yoga & meditating.Photo: Cherry Blossoms in Storms, 2012, Brenda Clews, 22" x 16", 56cm x 40.5cm, charcoal on triple-primed cotton canvas sheet.  

Where I'm at today. Fighting off, well stuff of all sorts - the kind that tries to silence you - doing yoga & meditating.Photo: The Homeless Man, Brenda Clews, 2012, 24" x 18", 60cm x 45cm, charcoal, acrylic ink, oil paint on 90lb archival paper.

I want it to be quite painful to look at, to get at feeling this... vulnerability, desperation, a hostile world internally and externally, loss ...perhaps a veteran suffering from PTSD, perhaps this is his nightmare. ...And yet. there is blue sky, patches of green grass in the dry yellow. While he seems almost praying or acknowledging the difficulties of the forces about him in a bowed position, and even insurmountably crawling forward, he also connects deeply to the ground on 'all fours.' In my sense of it, he draws energy for existence itself from the earth.

He is homeless; he has nothing, shorn of all trappings; he is still human. He maintains his dignity.Photo: Blake Man, Brenda Clews, 2012, 24" x 18", 60cm x 45cm, charcoal on 90lb archival paper.Photo: She Rests on Pillows in the Grass, 2012, Brenda Clews24" x 18", 60cm x 45cm, oil paint on 90lb archival paper.Photo: Lateral Head 2012, Brenda Clews, each page: 27.9cm x 21.6cm, 11" x 8.5"; graphite, charcoal, Waterman sepia ink on Fierro paper.Photo: Canada Day 2012, Brenda Clews, 27.9cm x 21.6cm, 11" x 8.5", graphite, charcoal, red Bombay India ink on Fierro paper.Photo: Midnight Sun, in-process, 2012, Brenda Clews, 28" x 22", 71cm x 56cm, oil on canvas. A painting with a textual history. It was another painting before, but on my wall for half a year, and I couldn't look at it anymore. Deciding not to sand the canvas, or even prime it, I began painting over the original painting (https://picasaweb.google.com/103243515693467499824/MidnightSunWindOverGrass?authuser=0&feat=directlink). It may be done, not sure. The true test is how liveable is it?Photo: As if Death Were a Passion, Brenda Clews, 2012, 12" x 16", graphite and acrylic on triple-primed cotton canvas sheet.

outline the skeleton
in red
make the lines of the bones
red

alizarin crimson, cadmium red
flame red, poppy bright

ok, blood too

the passion of death

as if death
were a passionPhoto: As if Death Were a Passion, sketch, Brenda Clews, 2012, 12" x 16", graphite on triple-primed cotton canvas sheet.Photo: Two Lamps and a Pot of Orchids, sketch, Brenda Clews, 2012, 13" x 10", charcoal on archival paper.Photo: Two Lamps and a Pot of Orchids, Brenda Clews, 2012, 13" x 10", acrylic on archival paper.Photo: Torn, Brenda Clews, 2012, 11" x 15", charcoal and watercolour on archival paper.Photo: Harvest Moon, 2012, 17" x 14", mixed media on 90lb archival paper. I drew two poses of the same model on the same page, and she is holding a mirror in which she is reflected. I've called it Harvest Moon to celebrate the model's pregnancy of 6 months.Photo: She, herself, 2012, 12.5" x 12", mixed media on primed canvas sheet. The child-like drawing is a return to innocence. She touches herself. She is meditative, aware, loss and trust fill her, her erotic energy is strong.Photo: The Artist & Her Muse, 2012, 12" x 17", charcoal on primed canvas sheet.Photo: "Every Angel is terror. And yet,
ah, knowing you, I invoke you, almost deadly
birds of the soul" from Rilke, 2nd Duino Elegy, 2012, 18" x 24", charcoal, acrylic, primed canvas sheet.Photo: Medusa (sketch 2), digital final, 2012, 12" x 17", original is charcoal on primed canvas sheet.Photo: Medusa (sketch 2), mask layer, 2012, 12" x 17", original is charcoal on primed canvas sheet.Photo: Medusa (sketch 2), 2012, 12" x 17", charcoal on primed canvas sheet.Photo: Medusa (sketch 1), 2012, 12" x 17", charcoal on primed canvas sheet, digitally altered.Photo: Charcoal sketch of the same model as in the previous painting, done after the painting from a slightly different angle, on primed canvas.Photo: Replacing an earlier version of this poem painting with the charcoal sketch inverted.Photo: "Praise the world to the Angel, not the unsayable," sketch in-process, 2012, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", graphite, Moleskine folio Sketchbook A4. Title is a quote from Rilke's 9th Duino Elegy.Photo: Little Magnolia Tree That Is Now Blossoming, 2012, 6" x 10", mixed media, Grumbacher acid-free journal paper.

Just a little experiment... I found a dozen or so tubes of watercolour (Windsor & Newton as well as their Cotman line) in a dusty old box under my desk, tubes that must be 25 years old. Some of them are still usable! A quick watercolour sketch of an even quicker street sketch a week or two back.Photo: The Living Carry the Souls of the Dead, 2012, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", charcoal and oils, Moleskine folio Sketchbook A4.

She is a bit scary, but she has fine bones, a good musculature. :)

She is somewhere between life and death, where the soul resides. 

Notes on the process of this painting: http://brendaclews.blogspot.ca/2012/04/living-carry-souls-of-dead.htmlPhoto: Seated Man, in-progress, 24" x 30", 61cm x 76.2cm, mixed media on stretched canvas.Photo: Seated Man, in-progress, 24" x 30", 61cm x 76.2cm, mixed media on stretched canvas. What was done at TSA (see album note).Photo: Seated Man, 2012, 16" x 20", 40.6cm x 50.8cm, graphite on stretched canvas. What was done at TSA (see album note).Photo: Painting of a Sleeping Saluki, 2012, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, graphite, acrylic, India and acrylic inks, Moleskine folio Sketchbook A4.Photo: Woman Seated, Waiting, 2012, 16" x 20", 40.6cm x 50.8cm, graphite, India and acrylic inks on stretched canvas.Photo: 2 Woman of the Sea Far Inland, 2012, 18" x 24", 35.7cm x 61cm, acrylic, oil sticks, oil pastels on triple-primed canvas sheet.Photo: Sketch of a Saluki, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, graphite, Moleskine folio Sketchbook A4.Photo: Sketch of a Sketcher, from my Poetry Salon in March, of Jennifer Hosein, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, graphite, India and acrylic inks, Moleskine folio Sketchbook A4.Photo: Sketch of a Sketcher, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, graphite, Moleskine folio Sketchbook A4.Photo: Dancer in Red and Black, 2012, 16" x 20", India and acrylic inks, graphite, stretched canvas.Photo: Dancer - sketch 2, 2012, 16" x 20", graphite, stretched canvas.Photo: Dancer - sketch 1, 2012, 16" x 20", graphite, stretched canvas.Photo: Dancer -in-progress, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, graphite, India and acrylic inks, Moleskine folio Sketchbook A4. This began to go too far, and I laid way more ink down after this iPhone snap, until it was a mess. So I wet the painting, and began blotting the colour off. The final painting is the next image, and I am real happy with it.Photo: Dancer -sketch, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, graphite, India and acrylic inks, Moleskine folio Sketchbook A4.Photo: Dancer -1st wash of inks, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, graphite, India and acrylic inks, Moleskine folio Sketchbook A4.Photo: Dancer, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, graphite, India and acrylic inks, Moleskine folio Sketchbook A4.

Happy with this painting of a dancer in my Moleskine. Why? She is lithe and muscular, and has an elegance. She also looks like she's dancing in an ink painting. Splotches of black India ink move over her; she is situated in torrents of acrylic flame red ink. In her dance, she holds still for a moment and her pose imparts a tension of the energy of emotion. There is life, passion and death here.

What I most enjoyed was overdoing this piece. Many inks were dip penned and brush spread until it was a mess, and then, miraculously, I washed the inks off, using all my rags and a half roll of paper towels, wetting and blotting until the sketch began to re-emerge.

With that weight of paint removed from her, of which only I hold the memory, she is again lithe, ready to spring.Photo: Figure, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, graphite.Photo: Figure, Brenda Clews, 2012, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, India and acrylic inks, Moleskine folio Sketchbook.Photo: Because the flowers, which I was given exactly a week ago, are ready for the compost, this is my last painting of these tulips and daffodils. It is quite abstract. Likely it's mostly finished, except for some minor tinkering maybe tomorrow. 

Tulips and Daffodils #4, 12" x 16", an acrylic base, with the flowers in oils.Photo: Self-Portrait Study 3, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, graphite, oils, India and acrylic inks.

In the Moleskine, the earlier sketch in this album. 

(No, I never ever wear eyeliner like that, not in my whole life. Anyway, it's a self portrait that is its own painting and only has some resemblance to me.)

I wanted it to have something beyond itself, be piercing somehow, and even be hard to look at. Somewhat disheveled and distorted, a sadness there, the more difficult realities of our experience, I guess.Photo: 'The Woman Who Is Not Quite Effaced,' 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, graphite, acrylic, gel pen.

You might recognize the underlying sketch, which I never liked, and which I always intended to sweep paint over.Photo: Tulips and Daffodils 3, 16" x 20", oils, acrylic ink on canvas.

When I came home last night and looked at this painting drying on the wall, I thought it 'too dark.' This morning I rubbed out a lot of the colour in the background, added some definition to the daffodils, some white ink lines to the the background energies.

The flowers were a gift last weekend, and I followed a hankering to paint them (by buying stretched canvases and covering my dining room table in plastic sheeting)- this is my third, and likely final, painting of the vase of beauties.Photo: Tulips and Daffodils 3, 16" x 20", oils on canvas.

Wish I'd taken a photo of the underlying sketch because I liked it. This painting works, I know it does. But it is not 'neat' or 'tidy' or very well contained. It is on the edge of oblivion. A floral swan song. The flowers are dying, the flowers are dying...

...magnificently.

The drive to abstraction is causing emotional distress (you should be glad you didn't see), but every attempt I make to bring the flowers to my usual dance between drawing and painting results in a decrease of energy on the canvas, and so I must respect the muse, and let the musa sing...Photo: 2- Tulips and Daffodils, 2012, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", India inks, oils, Moleskine folio Sketchbook.

(I do laugh, though. If you know anything of my green fire, chthonic rhizome garden goddess, you might see her here. Entirely unintentional - but garden goddesses who are molecular frenzies, chlorophyll arias, are like that - one arm bent behind her hourglass figure in a blue strapless dress, her bosom bursting green stalks,  yellow daffodils and red tulips, no head, but you can't have everything... lol)Photo: Tulips & Daffodils, 2012, 16" x 20", oil on canvas.

Yesterday I was given fresh flowers, and so I dashed over to the art store and bought a canvas and came home, set up my dining room table, and painted them.

My son really likes these flowers as they are, and so, despite the leaves losing that white scraped line from a distance, I am considering it finished. It is a painting for a small space, a kitchen or hall, meant to be looked at up close.

For me, the painting is about the two extravant, opulent tulips, each offering to bloom outside the canvas.Photo: Self-Portrait Study 4, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, graphite.Photo: Self-Portrait Study 4, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, graphite.Photo: Self-Portrait Study 4, detail, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, graphite.Photo: Self-Portrait Study 3, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, graphite.

Just before shop closing I got the 'bright' idea to run out and try to find a magnified 'make-up' mirror, thinking my problem is that I can't see up close without readers (which I don't wear otherwise). I found a $2.99 mirror at the dollar store! Distorted glass? -maybe. On my way out, I stopped & thought, why not just try something quickly? Ha. An hour later. The eyes resemble mine, but a bit big. Too lazy to do all those curls, indication suffices. Seriously, folks, I ended up scribbling on it holding the Moleskine against my chest looking into a large mirror! I've certainly got my desperate and perplexed look at how difficult doing damn drawing of myself is! I have a 30" x 40" canvas ready and waiting, but am trying to learn how to draw my aging face as we get acquainted again seemingly for new (since I haven't achieved a true likeness yet - resemblance, yes, yes, but....). Onward, fearless artists!... :) :)Photo: Woman in Red and Blue, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, mixed media.

Not to labour the point, but I fiddled a bit and cropped. The scanner, while enabling a high resolution/good colour image, misses texture. One day I'll get a decent camera to take these paintings - this one is scored with lines from toothpicks, dental tools, knitting needles, and different media - pens, inks, paints, rubbings and scratchings... I didn't like the initial sketch (self portrait from a mirror image) and was too impatient to work on it so I thought I'd see how the figure could emerge through washes of black paint, and then all the other media I used, inks, acrylics, oils, from fountain pen inks, dip pens, ball point pens and brushes and cloths. Often I spray fixatives between layers too, so there's a few of those. A figure does emerge, and there's a welter of emotion in that worked surface.Photo: (Earlier version, too bright) 'Woman in Red and Blue,' 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, mixed media. This is what the painting looks like in bright natural daylight.Photo: Iridescent Blue Face, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook,  mixed media.Photo: Self-Portrait Study, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, graphite.

A study for a self-portrait that I plan to paint... will have to try a few more sketches, I guess. Not quite right, but recognizable enough. Just did this one now, after a frigid dog walk. I do look so serious, but then, I am. :) Though pretty much always smile, guess I was very intently drawing here - in a dark room, too. 2B pencil. Note to self: smile a little when you do the painting. :)Photo: Coil of Koi in Dark Water, 21cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, multi-media.

Finished, unless I slightly whiten some of those Koi edges. I sparingly brushed the koi with some translucent paints (vellum, blue, orange, yellow), which glimmer. The fish have a pearlescence that you can see if you tilt the painting in the light.

They are like angels rising from Dante's Inferno.Photo: I've rubbed this out many times! Was going to scratch the koi out & add oranges, yellows, golds; so far, it's not working. In process!

My writing: 'When the plump Chinese lady who owned the store came over to feed the koi, the fish swirled to the top of the tank, a mass of watercolours and oils coiling and curving and looping in and out of each other as each fish rose to eat bits of the koi feed. Their gills translucent against the misted windows of the store.

The glass thinned, melted and the koi are flung out of the tank as the water rushed out, a coiling, spawning tidal wave. The gills of the koi became soft wings, they grew like when you drop a stopper of ink into water and patterns of ink coil and flow outwards and upwards as they disperse. The koi’s filmy, translucent wings spread and grew thinner as they rose, a coiling mass of golds, oranges, yellows and browns, a living tree spinning upwards, a whirlpool of fish like leaves flowing into the sky, for the ceiling had disappeared.'Photo: fleurs, la mort, le bouffon..., 21cm x  29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, multi-media.

...at the edge of the world
where flowers drop their petals...

longer blog post here: http://brendaclews.blogspot.com/2012/01/fleurs-la-mort-le-bouffon.htmlPhoto: Springer Spaniel, 21cm x  29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, multi-media.

The original sketch, Reserva ink that is not permanent, lost its delicacy with a matte fixative, then the background, which I quite like, does not work with the drawing of my dog. I was in a funk before I began, so it's not surprising. My morning Moleskine page.Photo: 'House Plant, 3', 4th draft, 21cm x  29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, oils.Photo: 'The House Plant, 2', 3rd draft, 21cm x  29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, oils. 

Where it ended up. Dark, gloomy. It's the black. Most artists don't use it at all. It's very hard to work with. Oh, ok as an outline or as some clothing or a hair colour or to efface a section... but if I start with a black background rather than white I always run into problems. Even though coming from nothing, arising out of the blackness, works for me metaphorically, in paint... it's been most challenging. I had hoped my relation to black had changed and so I began optimistically with a black background (brushed, not fully opague), but it hasn't changed.Photo: 'The House Plant,' 21cm x  29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, oils, India and watercolour inks. 

A meditation in ink on the plant, which withdraws its essence into its own mystery even as it offers its vibrancy. The brush wet with ink, you only have one chance. Lift the brush, glide it on the paper. 

This plant is on my dining room table.Photo: 'Untitled,' 21cm x  29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, India and acrylic inksPhoto: "LANGUAGE IS THE CAGE THROUGH WHICH I EXPRESS MY PASSION"21cm x  29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2011, India and acrylic ink, gel pen, oil paint on Moleskine Folio Sketchbook A4 prepared with a base of acrylic matte medium.  

I think it's finished, but... could give arms & hands more definition, a lyrical line; on the other hand, she is marionette-like. She is meant to impart a feeling of contained, & what easier way to convey that imprisonedness, in language, in form than with hands & feet that are as if sewn? The feet hang almost, puppet-like, & the hands are as if sewn into the lines of the painting -yet there is a regal quality to her, I think of her as a doll who has echoes of a Spanish dancer, proud, beautiful. Her head, neck & torso have an inner frame, perhaps wood, over which the costume is affixed; the arms & legs are stuffed cloth. The way such dolls are. She wears a corset & only half of a skirt of black lace. Despite the contraints, she dances in the painting, the passion broiling in the red, firing her.Photo: Three Cocoon-Nests, 21cm x  29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, multi-media.

It is a little Surreal -just think what might hatch from those cocoon-nests... there is something strange about them.

I saw them in my mind last night when I was thinking about what to paint today. What are they? And what will emerge?

While there was a bare tree outside my window, it was too dark to see, and, yes, it's like yesterday's tree, but remember, I'm working in a Moleskine sketchbook, and that page was closed, so I painted from my imagination.Photo: Springer Spaniel, 21cm x  29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, multi-media.

The original sketch, Reserva ink that is not permanent, lost its delicacy with a matte fixative, then the background, which I quite like, does not work with the drawing of my dog. I was in a funk before I began, so it's not surprising. My morning Moleskine page from today.Photo: 'House Plant, 3', 2nd draft, 21cm x  29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, oils.Photo: 'House Plant, 3', 1st draft, 21cm x  29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, oils.

Not to be undone by black, I begin again. A lighter black wash, and quickly brushing the main forms out of it.Photo: 'The House Plant, 2', 2nd draft, 21cm x  29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, oils. 

A meditation in ink on the plant, which withdraws its essence into its own mystery even as it offers its vibrancy. Today I used an acrylic base and oil paints. 

I ended up scraping much of the lighter green off, and, unfortunately, the photo of this stage is a bit blurred.Photo: 'The House Plant, 2', 3rd draft, 21cm x  29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, oils. 

A meditation in ink on the plant, which withdraws its essence into its own mystery even as it offers its vibrancy. Today I used an acrylic base and oil paints. 

The painting in my Moleskine is darker than this in most light; I took this photo in daytime shade.Photo: 'The House Plant, 2', 1st draft, 21cm x  29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2012, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, oils. 

A meditation in ink on the plant, which withdraws its essence into its own mystery even as it offers its vibrancy. Today I used an acrylic base and oil paints. 

This is the same house plant as in the previous image; it is on my dining room table.Photo: 'Bountiful Garden,' 21cm x  29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2011, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, sized with Golden GAC-100, painted with watercolour and India inks. 

I panned this painting with my Canon Vixia webcam on a new tripod, testing how smoothly I could move the HD camera. It worked quite well - only one little glitch as I moved slightly horizontally to focus on the figure's face that I edited out. It was almost the cusp of the new year, so I created a short (44sec) New Year's Greeting video card, that you can watch here: http://youtu.be/RCrPJCN-QbgPhoto: The colour is a bit washed out, see the next image for a better rendition.

'In the Park in June,' 21cm x  29cm, 8"x11.5", 2011, Moleskine folio Sketchbook, sized with Golden GAC-100, painted with watercolour and India inks. 

-A few layers of GAC-100 (artificial rabbit glue) on the paper prepares it for painting. I found the GAK gives you a little time to change your mind - you can dab the colour out before it sets permanently, so it is a little more forgiving than unsized paper which absorbs the colour instantly. It has a satin shine that is not like a varnish because it grabs the inks and sets them. It is faintly glossy, like brushed egg whites on cooked pastry, beneath the paint, which overlays it and is opaque. The GAK is not like a varnish because it is underneath the paint. It gives a luminescence to the painting that the camera does not quite capture. 

-Likely keep paintings like these in my book, or framed under glass. It is a fragile surface that I would not wish to intrude upon with a fixative.Photo: "LANGUAGE IS THE CAGE THROUGH WHICH I EXPRESS MY PASSION"
-detail-
21cm x  29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2011, India and acrylic ink, gel pen, oil paint on Moleskine Folio Sketchbook A4 prepared with a base of acrylic matte medium.

You can buy this print at: http://fineartamerica.com/featured/language-is-the-cage-through-which-i-express-my-passion-brenda-clews.htmlPhoto: "LANGUAGE IS THE CAGE THROUGH WHICH I EXPRESS MY PASSION"

21cm x  29cm, 8" x 11.5", 2011, India and acrylic ink, gel pen, oil paint on Moleskine Folio Sketchbook A4 prepared with a base of acrylic matte medium.Photo: 'Fluid Dreams in Green: The woman who is trapped, trying to break free. Rising.' 21cm x 29.5cm, 8.25" x 11.5", India and acrylic inks, oil pastels, acrylics, Molseskine Folio Sketchbook A4.

Am I happy with this painted ink drawing? Uh, maybe - but after I get used to what happened with the inks and paints on the paper, I begin to. It's not pretty, or sublime; rather, a woman rising as if out of a forest floor of mulch, slime. Yet, despite my painterly difficulties with its not being polished, and my hesitation and then determination to leave it raw, I understand the psychic process. This morning, for the first time in months, I felt refreshed, and there was a welcome torrential cloud-bursting rain storming the windows too.

The thought came that perhaps I should try and do one drawing/painting every day for a week, but carving out of my imagination one of these Moleskine Folio pages takes everything out of me.

I don't know if I'd have the emotional stamina to work on this excruciating excavation every day.Photo: 'whaleskin,' 2011, 20cm x 25.5cm, 8" x 10", India ink, graphite, watercolour pencils, Moleskine Folio Sketchbook A4. 

Anchored in my mind all day, a koan. What in death does not die?  I brush a wash of India ink onto paper. Ground burnt bones thickened with resins. Words in the black wave. Words in the black tusk of the whale whose skin swims with algae, barnacles, skeletal memories of cattle, the backbones of live fish in the orange sunset that beaches the creature like a hammerhead of knuckles. The creatures of the world fight for their lives. In the mass extinction. In the radioactive orange water into which the sun has fallen. The salty sludge-lined ocean, layers of plastic bags hugging the sand, shopping for the moment.

It was a Zen moment. 

What in death does not die.

Recording at Rubies in Crystal:  http://brendaclews.blogspot.com/2011/07/whaleskin.htmlPhoto: whaleskin, 2011, 20cm x 25.5cm, 8" x 10", India ink, graphite, watercolour pencils, Moleskine Folio Sketchbook A4. 

Anchored in my mind all day, a koan. What in death does not die?  I brush a wash of India ink onto paper. Ground burnt bones thickened with resins. Words in the black wave. Words in the black tusk of the whale whose skin swims with algae, barnacles, skeletal memories of cattle, the backbones of live fish in the orange sunset that beaches the creature like a hammerhead of knuckles. The creatures of the world fight for their lives. In the mass extinction. In the radioactive orange water into which the sun has fallen. The salty sludge-lined ocean, layers of plastic bags hugging the sand, shopping for the moment.

It was a Zen moment. 

What in death does not die.Photo: Daphne, 20.5cm x 30cm, 8" x 11.75", dip pen with India, acrylic and fountain pen inks, Moleskine Folio Sketchbook A4.

I lay in the park sketching the tree; though invisible to the biological eye, she was there. Neither did the lake exist, nor the rocks. It was sunny and yet I found a sliver of a moon and a star on the paper. The child in me saw her. She is like a paper cut-out, drawn as a child would draw; she is Daphne. Look at her laurel crown. Her arms are turning into branches with leaves. I found her ghostdrawing her myth in the green dreaming imagination of the woman drawing in the book on her lap.

This Daphne is caught, perpetually transforming, as night falls. Apollo, the god of light, long gone. No sign of Cupid's arrow, if it ever flew.

(scanned image, not so accurate on richness of colour in the 'pearlescent' inks, but nice overall effect)Photo: Daphne, 20.5cm x 30cm, 8" x 11.75", dip pen with India, acrylic and fountain pen inks, Moleskine Folio Sketchbook A4.

(This one was photographed with my video camera's 8MP camera.)Photo: Daphne, 20.5cm x 20.5cm, 8" x 8", dip pen with India, acrylic and fountain pen inks, Moleskine Folio Sketchbook A4.

I lay in the park sketching the tree; though invisible to the biological eye, she was there. Neither did the lake exist, nor the rocks. It was sunny and yet I found a sliver of a moon and a star on the paper. The child in me saw her. She is like a paper cut-out, drawn as a child would draw; she is Daphne. Look at her laurel crown. Her arms are turning into branches with leaves. I found her ghostdrawing her myth in the green dreaming imagination of the woman drawing in the book on her lap.

This Daphne is caught, perpetually transforming, as night falls. Apollo, the god of light, long gone. No sign of Cupid's arrow, if it ever flew.Photo: The Dancer with the Full Moon in her Throat, sketch 2, 2011, 20cm x 28cm, 8" x 11", India, ink, graphite, Moleskine Folio Sketchbook A4.Photo: The Dancer with the Full Moon in her Throat, sketch 1, 2011, 20cm x 28cm, 8" x 11", India, ink, graphite, Moleskine Folio Sketchbook A4.Photo: 'skinbones,' 2011, 20cm x 28.5cm, 8" x 11.25", India, acrylic and fountain pen inks, watercolour pencils, Moleskine Folio Sketchbook A4.Photo: Sketch, 2011, 19cm x 25.5cm, 7.5" x 10", India and acrylic inks on Moleskine Folio Sketchbook A4.

Words: CONFIGURE ITPhoto: 20.5cm x 20.5cm, 8" x 8", sepia ink, Moleskine Folio Sketchbook A4.

A whimsical drawing of Daphne becoming-tree drawn in the park in late spring.Photo: Vision Trees, 2011, 74cm x 56cm, 29" x 22", India inks, acrylic inks, oils, 300lb Arches watercolour paper. 

Perhaps this needs more contrast? They are my vision trees. The lightness may grow on me and I may leave it as is. We are in the exuberance of spring, the budding greens, pale, luminescent everywhere.

I made an 8 min time lapse video with a story while painting this: http://youtu.be/SUevXeBE8hA  The original footage was sped up 1200%, and if you'd like to listen to/or read the story - I speak it, and I subtitled the video so it can be translated into other languages, click on the CC -  it looks best sped up 2X again.Photo: I wrote 'Lacemaker,' a prose poem, in July 2007. In May 2011 I recorded it on my iPhone, a quiet reading, and added a track in the background from the Music Text Composition Generator that I had entered the poem into. While the midi file that the MTCG created is layered a few times, the poem is its own music, yes.

A few days ago I was tidying my desk, and came across a notebook from that year, and found a drawing I did in Starbucks during lunch and a draft in pencil of part of the poem.

Blog post with the recording, link to the poem: http://brendaclews.blogspot.com/2011/05/lacemaker.htmlPhoto: 'Lady of Green Fire,' 20.5cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", India inks, Waterman sepia ink, acrylic inks, gel pens, oil paint, oil pastels, watercolour pencils, Moleskine sketchbook. 

A Venus arising from a sea of leaves. A green garden goddess. Perhaps she is Spring welcoming the sun. Not fully clothed yet. Or the Woman Clothed with the Sun. Yes, I like that. 

This photo taken on my marble coffee table.Photo: 'Lady of Green Fire,' 20.5cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", India inks, Waterman sepia ink, acrylic inks, gel pens, oil paint, oil pastels, watercolour pencils, Moleskine sketchbook. 

A Venus arising from a sea of leaves. A green garden goddess. Perhaps she is Spring welcoming the sun. Not fully clothed yet. Or the Woman Clothed with the Sun. Yes, I like that.Photo: 'Lady of Green Fire/Greet the Sun,' 20.5cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", India inks, Waterman sepia ink, acrylic ink, gel pens, oil paint, oil pastels, watercolour pencils, Moleskine sketchbook. 

A Venus arising from a sea of leaves. A green garden goddess. Perhaps she is Spring welcoming the sun. Not fully clothed yet. Yes, I like that. This is as far as I got tonight; I'm needing some iridescent blue ink to make leaf motifs in the sky, and of course, it's late and the art store is closed.Photo: 'Lady of Green Fire/Greet the Sun,' 20.5cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", India inks, Waterman sepia ink, gel pens, oil pastels, watercolour pencils, Moleskine sketchbook. [detail] 

This and the last one, Wing of Chrysalides, are mystical drawings.Photo: 'Lady of Green Fire/Greet the Sun,' 20.5cm x 29cm, 8" x 11.5", India inks, Waterman sepia ink, gel pens, oil pastels, watercolour pencils, Moleskine sketchbook. [In process]. 

This and the last one, Wing of Chrysalides, are mystical drawings.Photo: 'Wing of Chrysalides,' 2011, 20cm x 27cm, 8" x 10.5", India inks, oil paint, oil pastel, watercolour pencils, Moleskine sketchbook.He  stands between two worlds; he is about to leap. His wing, of chrysalises. In his hand, a green butterfly. He is nearly undifferentiated in the green as he straddles the blue where he is clear.On him, glued, a piece of a shopping bill: 'Please retain receipt for purpose of completing the online survey.'Another piece of the receipt, which hangs like a white fish, or perhaps only a rhythm.Photo: I inked the dinosaur right out, and then covered it in a web of pencil, which the high gloss lacquer fixative demolished. This scan was taken just before.Photo: Wing of Crysalises, 2011, 20cm x 27cm, 8" x 10.5", mixed media.

He stands between two worlds; he is about to leap. His wing, of crysalises. He holds a green butterfly in his hand. He is nearly undifferentiated in the green as he straddles the blue where he is clear.

On him, glued, piece of a shopping bill: 'Please retain receipt for purpose of completing the online survey.'

Added another piece of the receipt, which hangs like a white fish, or perhaps only a rhythm, in the final version.Photo: Wing of Crysalises, 2011, 20cm x 27cm, 8" x 10.5", mixed media. He is about to leap. His wing, of crysalises. (Words of a shopping bill: 'Please retain receipt for purpose of completing the online survey.')Photo: Webbed drawing done at Scribbler Too, and do click on the link, you'll have fun: http://www.zefrank.com/scribbler/scribblertoo/Photo: Green Fire: a photo poem.... a digitally manipulated image taken with my iPhone. 

My son, at 4 years, describing a scribble drawing, said, 'It's green fire: there's some in your life; and some in mine.' He knew. (He's 24 now, but some things you never forget.)Photo: Still from my first time-lapse art video, a dinosaur, pulsing green, voiceover poem... http://youtu.be/9zSdGLEsYlYPhoto: Wandering Nomads Bone Image, 2011, 19cm x 16.5cm, 7.5"x6.5", mostly archival inks, sepia, black, red, orange, and oil pastels, Moleskine sketchbook.

Fishbones, dinosaur bones, ivory piano keys of the mind playing its strange music, I don't know. When I sat to draw an image for the poem, a vertebrae emerged.

There is a poem with this image, but it's too long for Picasa's word limit. Read it at my blog: http://brendaclews.blogspot.com/2011/03/whirling-stillness.htmlPhoto: The Dancer's Backskin, 2011, 21cm x 29cm, 8"x11.5", ink, watercolour on Moleskin notebook paper. 

- now an art video: http://youtu.be/Kg9867bn9QQ - 

The drawing was an accident - I had bought a new Moleskine notebook, the largest ever for me. When I brushed water over
 watercolour pencil the paper shredded badly and cracked like an eggshell when dry. Intrigued with the effect, and having seen Natalie Portman's incredible performance in Black Swan, the self-mutilation, the hallucinations, the madnesses, I thought of the underside of the dancer's life. Or her backskin.

In the image you see here, I layered a scan of the frontside of the drawing facing forwards (you can see it in the lines at the borders) under the backside which I made slightly opaque. I banded the dancer's face (some horror there, she is buried alive in her inhuman effort to be graceful for us), and her feet (to remind us of ballet as an echo of Geisha footbinding).Photo: Lineman, 2011, computer drawn using this site, &, um, yeah, Photoshop: http://www.zefrank.com/scribbler/scribblertoo/

I may print this and colour or paint it. The figure seems menacing, somehow, and what are those black balls - are they bombs? The image is entangled with Middle Eastern suicide bombers in my mind - that box strapped to his torso...Photo: Dancers in White, 2011, 21cm x 29cm, 8"x11.5", ink on Moleskine.Photo: Same as Dancer's Backskin (a few images hence), only the other side run through a filter, can't remember which, maybe old paper. (This one became a video slideshow, a video poem, 'The Dancer's Backskin: http://youtu.be/Kg9867bn9QQ )Photo: Green Fire, 21cm x 29.2cm, 8" x 11.5", Moleskine, ink. Words: 'Follow the green fire that's in your life and in mine. Billow. Float through green streams of smoke. Remember to look under the burning leaf.' And: 'waiting for spring in the emotional subconscious'Photo: Dark Women, 2011, 20cm x 28cm, 8" x 11", India inks with a dip pen, and various fountain pen inks. Words: Who are we in our shadows? Explore a darker terrain. Welcome complexity, seething underbed where spring is already generating below the frozen ground, snow-filled land of ice. The green, the brown rising. Darkly. Look at the half-seen and explore the invisible. Does mystery make us apprehensive? Go deeper. Plunge.Photo: 'Dark Woman,' 2011, India inks, a detail from a slightly larger drawing (8"x10"approx) that I'm working on...Photo: Self-Portrait, 2011, 20.5cm x 25.5cm, 8" x 10", archival, Rotring and India inks on archival paper. Instead of a slideshow of the process of this ink drawing, I've opened the images in Photoshop Elements and taken a screen capture. The plain pencil sketch upper left and the black and white one in the middle are the 'real' ones - the others have been filtered with Sepia (& currently used for profile pics at Identica, Twitter & Facebook♥:). I know, it is a bit much.:))Photo: Self-Portrait, 2011, 20.5cm x 25.5cm, 8" x 10", archival, Rotring and India inks on archival paper. Pen is quite unforgiving, and the paper clogged the nibs somewhat making even lines uneven. It's okay. Surely some writing will emerge in this page, though presently I have no idea what.Photo: 'The Sun Falls Before Dark,' 17.8cmx 23.9cm, 7" x 9", India ink, pencil, archival paper. 

...the sun falls before dark,
folds of grace.

(written in the bridge: 'walls, walls, walls, indecision, indecision'; in back of bridge, 'dirt, dirt'; on the grass, 'grass, grass.' etc.)Photo: 'The Sun Falls Before Dark,' sketch, 17.8cmx 23.9cm, 7" x 9", archival ink, archival paper.

A very quick sketch.Photo: 'Secrets,' 20.5cm x 25.5cm, 8"x10", India inks, archival pen inks, graphite, coffee spill, and some digitally drawn lines as well as text, January, 2011.  I recorded the writing as I wrote it, and you can listen to the pen scratching on paper and quiet contemplative voicing of the words as they emerged, as well as read the poem, here: http://brendaclews.blogspot.com/2011/01/secrets_12.htmlPhoto: 'Secrets, 20.5cm x 25.5cm, 8"x10", India inks, archival pen inks, graphite, coffee spill, uploaded January 11, 2011 - a doodle, though I did make a stop and start voice recording as I was writing the words (you can hear the pen scratching on paper in some of it). I'll see about hosting the recording somewhere, and transcribing it I guess. I don't think this piece is finished yet, though maybe it is.Photo: Beached Heart

layer flowing of
ocean in Whale-God
with pearls, jazz
cat* in belly

salt blood a
political flow-body of
ecological appropriation
against fishermen

siphoning ocean water
mollusk, crill, sand
singing whale songs
in matter-energy flow

its capture
the red sand
blood-flow against
black co-agulated ink

a linguistic continuity
politic of ecobeing
folding fish bone into brine
ocean foam


(c) 2010 Brenda Clews
__
*Schrodinger's cat

'Beached Heart,' 2010, 8" x 11", 20cm x 27cm, India ink, Faber-Castelli watercolour pencils on archival paper.

'Beached Heart,' a poem painting, though the words in the drawing are a poeming different to the poem, about a harpooned whale.Photo: Photo: Photo: Winter Tree, little pencil sketch on a dreary afternoon during the deep-freeze of an endless winter.Photo: Lady in Red Corset, life-drawing @ Urban Gallery 1Feb2014, model: Manminder, by Brenda Clews, 11" x 15", charcoal, graphite, India inks, pastels, etc., on primed canvas sheet.Photo: Ithwark,  ©Brenda Clews, 2014. 15" x 12", Noodler's black ink, Arches watercolour block, 100% cotton, 140lbs.Photo: 'My Childhood (1972)', directed by Douglas, on Mubi, which I watched last night, and then way too late thought I'd pause and draw... wrote some thoughts on the film into the image... https://mubi.com/films/my-childhoodPhoto: The Butterfly Men, underdrawing (in-process), ©BrendaClews, 16" x 20", charcoal fixed with Golden's sizer, Gak 100, on 1.5" stretched gallery canvas. Two more butterflies are coming.Photo: the moment
the wind came

lost on the way
then, never mind

I had to push it all in
to whatever
spaces were left for me

‘LostOnTheWay,Then,Nevermind,’ 2015, ©Brenda Clews, 11” x 14”, graphite, permanent inks on Strathmore 80lb archival drawing paper.Photo: Untitled, work-in-progress, ©Brenda Clews 2015, 16" x 20", oil on canvas.Photo: Charcoal Poems, 2015, © Brenda Clews, 5' x 5', oil and charcoal on canvasPhoto: Charcoal Poems, 2015, © Brenda Clews, 5' x 5', charcoal and oil on canvasPhoto: Photo: Charcoal Poems, © Brenda Clews 2015, 5' x 5', charcoal and oil on canvas.