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Writer Clay McLeod Chapman and artist Will Robson chat with Marvel.com about "Typhoid Fever" and what to expect next: http://bit.ly/2BbnPP6
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THIS LITTLE TURD IS THE PROBLEM IN WASHINGTON
COMPLETELY UNFIT FOR OFFICE
NOT HONEST ABOUT HIMSELF
OR ANYTHING HE TOUCHES......
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How Neuroscience Helps Understanding Criminal Mind?

This study allowing researchers to better view and understand the criminal mind.

https://thetechinside.com/how-neuroscience-helps-understanding-criminal-mind/
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Google Search is adding user comments, starting with live sports

Back in October, Google announced that it was killing Google+ for consumers following a privacy bug. While serving as an admission that the company’s take on social failed, it has become clear in recent months that the company is still very interested in…
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Where Does All Earth’s Gold Come From? | #Geology #GeologyPage #Gold

During the formation of Earth, molten iron sank to its centre to make the core. This took with it the vast majority of the planet’s precious metals — such as gold and platinum.

Read more : http://www.geologypage.com/2011/09/where-does-all-earths-gold-come-from.html
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What Your Eyes Can Tell You About Your Liver

Your eyes are a unique window into health. How Nutrition has assembled a list of 14 things your eyes can tell you about your entire body. Here are some of them:

https://medmd.org/what-your-eyes-can-tell-you-about-your-liver/
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Lindsey Graham to Become Senate Judiciary Chairman and Trump Point Man https://nym.ag/2QPyGE2
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Via +Josh Fisher
It is easy to understand why cognitive load theory has largely been neglected. As Kirschner, Sweller and Clark pointed out in their seminal 2006 paper (http://www.cogtech.usc.edu/publications/kirschner_Sweller_Clark.pdf), the implications of cognitive load theory for fashionable teaching methods are dire. Not only is it inefficient to learn via problem solving or by imitating the behaviours of expert practitioners, it is quite possible to learn nothing at all. Behavioural activity is not a proxy for learning. In other words, we cannot assume that learning will always accompany doing. Instead, we need to engage cognitive activity and at just the right level of complexity.

Cognitive load theory: Research that teachers really need to understand: https://www.cese.nsw.gov.au/publications-filter/cognitive-load-theory-research-that-teachers-really-need-to-understand
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Apple tells Foxconn and Pegatron to forget about opening additional production lines for iPhone XR? - Most analysts expected the "more affordable" Apple iPhone XR to grab the majority of new iPhone sales once the phone was released on October 26th. That's because of the model's pricing, which starts at $749 for the 64GB version compared to $999 for the comparable iPhone XS unit, and $1,099 for the 64GB iPhone XS Max. While the iPhone XR has the same A12 Bionic SoC under the hood, and carrie...
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The Royal Road of the King of the World exists at the very center of Earth’s landmass. In ancient times this central region was denominated by many civilizations living upon it as the “Center of the Earth.”
Ancient Origins
Ancient Origins
ancient-origins.net
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Muhammad Ali Takes Buster Mathis This Day November 17, 1971

Muhammad Ali 227 lbs
Buster Mathis 256 lbs
UD in round 12 of 12
Location: Astrodome, Houston, Texas, USA
Referee: Chris Jordan 118-105
Judge: Ernie Taylor 118-104
Judge: Earl Keel 119-108
NABF Heavyweight Title

https://youtu.be/JoE3zyyTe6g

#boxinghalloffamelasvegas #muhammadali #cassiusclay
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Via +Josh Fisher
So whether you’re trying to learn how to tie your shoes, a new musical instrument, a new task at work, or new information, give yourself the time to do it. Practice a little bit each day and you will perform better than if you try to do too much in any one sitting.
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SoxB1 genes play fundamental roles in neurodevelopmental processes and maintaining stem cell multipotency, but little is known about their function in regeneration.
[...]
Our analyses highlight soxB1-2-regulated genes that are expressed in sensory neurons and are homologous to factors implicated in epileptic disorders in humans and animal models of epilepsy, indicating that planarians can serve as a complementary model to investigate genetic causes of epilepsy.

Ross et al. (2018) SoxB1 Activity Regulates Sensory Neuron Regeneration, Maintenance, and Function in Planarians:
1)https://www.cell.com/developmental-cell/fulltext/S1534-5807(18)30835-9
2)https://www.cell.com/action/showPdf?pii=S1534-5807%2818%2930835-9
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Space.com: Farewell, Kepler: NASA Shuts Down Prolific Planet-Hunting Space Telescope.
https://www.space.com/42461-kepler-exoplanet-hunting-telescope-shuts-down.html
Space.com
Space.com
space.com

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"Forests in the Pacific Northwest will be less vulnerable to drought and fire over the next three decades than those in the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada, computer modeling by researchers in Oregon State University's College of Forestry shows.

The findings, published today in Global Change Biology, represent an important tool for scientists and land managers because woodlands throughout the western United States are under increasing stress from accelerated rates of drought-related mortality related to global, human-caused climate change.

Also, the Northwest's hemlock, Douglas-fir and redwood forests have tremendous potential to counteract climate change via their carbon-sequestration abilities, meaning policies that promote stewardship of those forests is critical, the scientists say.

"Recent prolonged droughts and catastrophic wildfires in the West have raised concerns about forest mortality and how that might impact forest structure and ecosystem services and also the economic vitality of nearby communities," said corresponding author Polly Buotte of OSU's Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society. "Forests in the West support high species diversity and some Pacific Northwest forests are among the highest carbon-density forests on Earth."

Buotte and College of Forestry colleague Beverly Law led a collaboration that modeled 13 different major forest types from around the western United States, taking into account climate conditions and atmospheric carbon dioxide levels over the next 30 years.

The model was high-resolution both from a spatial standpoint - it broke forests into grids of 16 square kilometers - and also because it looked at species-specific responses to environmental variables.

"The model calculated multiple biophysical and biogeochemical processes, including surface heat fluxes, photosynthesis, evaporation, transpiration, carbon allocation to plant tissue, decomposition and nitrogen cycling," Buotte said".

(Posted by +rasha kamel )
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Going, going — nope, it's still just going, NASA says of its Voyager 2 probe, which the agency realized was approaching the edge of the solar system back in early October. In a statement released yesterday (Nov. 14), NASA shared additional data from the probe that gives engineers a sense of where the spacecraft currently is in relation to the solar system.

The Voyager 2 probe, which launched in 1977, swung past the gas giants of our solar system, making this spacecraft the only device to gather detailed data about Uranus and Neptune. Then, its mission complete, Voyager 2 barrelled on, out toward the edge of our solar system.
 
The new data comes from an instrument called the Low Energy Telescope, which tracks the low-energy particles characteristic of our solar system. Given the data Voyager 1sent home during its 2012 farewell, the team expects those encounters with low-energy particles to nearly disappear as the probe makes its exit, NASA said.

A graph shows how many heliospheric particles are hitting the Voyager 2 spacecraft. When the probe leaves the solar system, that count will be near zero.

And at the beginning of November, the team noticed a sharp decline in the number of particles encountered — but not all the way down to nearly zero, where it will remain after it leaves our neighborhood. That means that the spacecraft still has a ways to go before scientists can finally declare it free of its home solar system.

The new data adds to the first warning of Voyager 2's impending departure, which came from the probe's High Energy Telescope, which measures high-energy particles. Those particles become more prevalent as a spacecraft leaves the solar system.

The spike in energetic particles is a signature of the probe gradually losing the protection of a bubble around our sun called the heliopause. That bubble is formed by the solar wind, a constant stream of charged particles that is born in the sun, quickly accelerates in the star's atmosphere and then sets off across the entire solar system.

Because the sun's strength ebbs and grows, the precise location of that heliopause bubble isn't constant, which makes determining when Voyager 2 finally makes its escape more challenging.

But even as Voyager 2 is investigating the far edge of that solar wind stream, a much newer NASA spacecraft has begun investigating the place where that solar wind picks up so much speed. That's the sun's outer atmosphere, called the corona. The agency's Parker Solar Probe, which launched in August, made its first of 24 planned science passes around the sun earlier this month.

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