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High resolution pictures of the NBA City Jerseys

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Very Useful Contents For Every Working Professionals & Students

~~~~ Click Below Image / Link to Download Excellent Materials on HR, Jobs, Accounts & Finance, Tax Saving, Engineering, Marketing etc. ~~~~

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New Book Reveals How Bill and Hillary Clinton ‘Systematically Destroyed’ The Integrity of the Secret Service

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Rubio's demand to expand child tax credit threatens GOP's slim margin on tax bill

The Republicans' razor-thin margin for driving their sweeping tax package through the Senate was thrown into jeopardy Thursday when GOP Sen. Marco Rubio declared he will vote against it unless negotiators expand the tax credit that low-income Americans can claim for their children.

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If Amy could have a super power, she would like to be able to fly, so she wouldn't have to buy expensive plane tickets home to visit her family! #DCCOfTheWeek

Read more on: bit.ly/2zdmRB3

#Sports #NFL #Cheerleaders

(Credit: Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders)

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Bonds, Armstrong, McGwire....Brady?

https://nesn.com/2017/12/pittsburgh-radio-host-adamant-tom-brady-is-among-worst-cheaters-in-sports/

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Astronomers have come up with a new and improved method for measuring the masses of millions of solitary stars, especially those with planetary systems.

Getting accurate measurements of how much stars weigh not only plays a crucial role in understanding how stars are born, evolve and die, but it is also essential in assessing the true nature of the thousands of exoplanets now known to orbit most other stars.

The method is tailor-made for the European Space Agency's Gaia Mission, which is in the process of mapping the Milky Way galaxy in three dimensions, and NASA's upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), which is scheduled for launch next year and will survey the 200,000 brightest stars in the firmament looking for alien earths.

"We have developed a novel method for 'weighing' solitary stars," said Stevenson Professor of Physics and Astronomy Keivan Stassun, who directed the development. "First, we use the total light from the star and its parallax to infer its diameter. Next, we analyze the way in which the light from the star flickers, which provides us with a measure of its surface gravity. Then we combine the two to get the star's total mass."

Stassun and his colleagues—Enrico Corsaro from INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania in Italy, Joshua Pepper from Leigh University and Scott Gaudi from Ohio State University—describe the method and demonstrate its accuracy using 675 stars of known mass in an article titled "Empirical, accurate masses and radii of single stars with TESS and GAIA" accepted for publication in the Astronomical Journal.

Traditionally, the most accurate method for determining the mass of distant stars is to measure the orbits of double star systems, called binaries. Newton's laws of motion allow astronomers to calculate the masses of both stars by measuring their orbits with considerable accuracy. However, fewer than half of the star systems in the galaxy are binaries, and binaries make up only about one-fifth of red dwarf stars that have become prized hunting grounds for exoplanets, so astronomers have come up with a variety of other methods for estimating the masses of solitary stars. The photometric method that classifies stars by color and brightness is the most general, but it isn't very accurate. Asteroseismology, which measures light fluctuations caused by sound pulses that travel through a star's interior, is highly accurate but only works on several thousand of the closest, brightest stars.

"Our method can measure the mass of a large number of stars with an accuracy of 10 to 25 percent. In most cases, this is far more accurate than is possible with other available methods, and importantly it can be applied to solitary stars so we aren't limited to binaries," Stassun said.

The technique is an extension of an approach that Stassun developed four years ago with graduate student Fabienne Bastien, who is now an assistant professor at Pennsylvania State University. Using special data visualization software developed by a neuro-diverse team of Vanderbilt astronomers, Bastein discovered a subtle flicker pattern in starlight that contains valuable information about a star's surface gravity.

Last year, Stassun and his collaborators developed an empirical method for determining the diameter of stars using published star catalog data. It involves combining information on a star's luminosity and temperature with Gaia Mission parallax data. (The parallax effect is the apparent displacement of an object caused by a change in the observer's point of view.)

"By putting together these two techniques, we have shown that we can estimate the mass of stars catalogued by NASA's Kepler mission with an accuracy of about 25 percent and we estimate that it will provide an accuracy of about 10 percent for the types of stars that the TESS mission will be targeting," said Stassun.

Establishing the mass of a star that possesses a planetary system is a critical factor in determining the mass and size of the planets circling it. An error of 100 percent in the estimate of the mass of a star, which is typical using the photometric method, can result in an error of as much as 67 percent in calculating the mass of its planets. This is roughly equivalent to the difference between a Mercury and an Earth. So, it is extremely important in properly assessing the nature of all the alien worlds that astronomers have begun detecting in recent years.


Credit: Michael Smelzer, Vanderbilt University


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Roy Moore Still Refuses to Concede and Just Released a Video Listing All the Bonkers Reasons Why https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2017/12/roy-moore-still-refuses-to-concede-alabama-senate-race-in-bonkers-video.html -via Flynx

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Check out all the best places the locals shop in #Delhi, from the busy city center to the quiet outer edge. #LocalGuides

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Here are suggestions for what people can do next - with phone numbers and addresses.

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Knicks hold off pesky Nets as Porzingis injury worry lingers http://nyp.st/2Bqy1UX

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Knicks guard Tim Hardaway Jr. describes leg injury as 'serious': Hardaway has been out since the beginning of December. http://dlvr.it/Q61sfs

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Google Assistant Comes To Older Android Phones

This is a pretty big deal. If you're running Android 5.0 and up, you get the Google Assistant now. Android 5.0 phones would have come out almost 4 years ago. Google is supporting Google Assistant for up to four year old devices. There are still language and country restrictions of course, but that is easy to get around. Often running the English version of the app will bypass the country restrictions and you'll be able to use the Google Assistant on your device no matter where you are in the world.

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Eighth planet found in faraway solar system, matching ours

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It's been in beta testing since this summer, so we have a fairly good idea of what it’s going to offer and some have even seen it for themselves.

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How to Use Snapchat and Instagram Stories to Increase Your Sales - Stories on Snapchat, Instagram and more are here to stay. Here's how to use them to their full potential in your social media strategy.

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This is your chance to make a positive impact in someone's evening: a list of unique good night greetings for you to find the one that fits your recipient best. --> #inspiration #motivation #change

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SoundCloud Redesign Shines Spotlight on Creator Communities - If you’re into music, you’ve probably visited the SoundCloud website or used its app before. For those of you who aren’t familiar, SoundCloud is a huge social media network for music producers, DJs, and the like to share their music and other related creations with the world. Those who listen to music on the platform can receive suggestions from a machine learning algorithm of what to listen to next. For a while, SoundCloud’s fat...

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In the blind

Day 6 of a B&W 7-day challenge, invited by +Polly W

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Green heart

My sea wawes page https://www.paolodalprato.com/water

#macrophotography #hqspmacro #hqspflowers #fotomaniaitalia #ilovephotography

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From Neuroscience News: Researchers Discover Simple Blood Sample Method for Detecting Multiple Sclerosis - Researchers have developed a new method for testing for multiple sclerosis. Using blood samples, researchers look for lower concentrations of sphingosine and dihydrosphingosine, two compounds linked to the neurodegnerative disease.

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“Kepler-90i is not a place I’d like to go visit,” Vanderburg said, adding that the planet probably has an average temperature of about 800 degrees Fahrenheit.

toasty.

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Here is another source of the same facts I have been reporting in this blog for some years now. Your #brain gets as much benefit from your cardiovascular #exercise as your body.

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You have until Monday to order from Mondo.

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Source: University of Leicester
Immense northern storms on Saturn can disturb atmospheric patterns at the planet’s equator, finds the international Cassini mission in a study led by Dr Leigh Fletcher from our Department of Physics and Astronomy and published in Nature Astronomy.

This effect is also seen in Earth’s atmosphere, suggesting the two planets are more alike than previously thought.

Despite their considerable differences, the atmospheres of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn all display a remarkably similar phenomenon in their equatorial regions: vertical, cyclical, downwards-moving patterns of alternating temperatures and wind systems that repeat over a period of multiple years.

These patterns—known as the Quasi-Periodic Oscillation (QPO) on Saturn and the Quasi-Quadrennial Oscillation (QQO) on Jupiter, due to their similarities to Earth’s so-called Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO)—appear to be a defining characteristic of the middle layers of a planetary atmosphere.

Earth’s QBO is regular and predictable, repeating every 28 months on average. However, it can be disrupted by events occurring at great distances from the equator of our planet—and a new study reveals that the same is true of Saturn’s QPO.

“These oscillations can be thought of as a planet’s heartbeat,” says Dr Fletcher who is lead author of the study and co-investigator of Cassini’s Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). “Cassini spotted them on Saturn about a decade ago, and Earth-based observations have seen them on Jupiter, too. Although the atmospheres of the distant gas giants may appear startlingly different to our own, when we look closely we start to discover these familiar natural patterns.”

Cassini observed Saturn from June 2004 until 15 September 2017 when the mission concluded by plunging into the gas planet's atmosphere. To better understand Saturn’s QPO, Fletcher and colleagues studied data from Cassini’s CIRS covering this entire time period.

Although the influence of Saturnian storms was known to be substantial, this study suggests an even wider influence than expected, and confirms a connection between Saturn’s QPO and remote, distinct events occurring elsewhere in the planet’s atmosphere.

“We became especially excited when we compared this palpitation on Saturn to one observed in Earth’s QBO in 2016: it was disturbed in a similar way by waves carrying momentum from Earth's northern hemisphere to the equator,” adds Fletcher. “That disruption was unprecedented in over 60 years of monitoring the QBO—and yet we were lucky enough to capture a similar behaviour at work on Saturn with Cassini.”

On Earth, this relationship between distant events in a planet’s climate system is known as teleconnection. Meteorological patterns across the globe are known to be delicately linked together, and can affect one another quite significantly. A key example of this is the El Niño Southern Oscillation, which can influence temperatures and climate patterns across the Earth.

Journal Reference:
Leigh N. Fletcher, Sandrine Guerlet, Glenn S. Orton, Richard G. Cosentino, Thierry Fouchet, Patrick G. J. Irwin, Liming Li, F. Michael Flasar, Nicolas Gorius, Raúl Morales-Juberías. Disruption of Saturn’s quasi-periodic equatorial oscillation by the great northern storm. Nature Astronomy, 2017; 1 (11): 765
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41550-017-0271-5

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Chicago companies fear unknown in net neutrality repeal

Federal regulators’ decision to end net neutrality and roll back regulations that some say kept data flowing freely on the internet has left some Chicago business owners concerned for their companies’ futures.

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Three takeaways from Broncos' win over Colts: Thursday's game didn't mean much this season, but Brock Osweiler made his case to be the Broncos' starting quarterback. http://dlvr.it/Q62TWZ

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These Spiritual Inspiration Poems are all wonderful words of wisdom and love. Reading them is an easy way to make you feel good and uplift your spirit which raises your vibration and attracts more joy into your life. --> #poetry

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"The internet as we know it is not ending."

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With Star Wars: The Last Jedi likely to be the biggest film of the year, Cineplex wanted to gauge how audiences reacted to the concept of a ticket surcharge on a wider scale.

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So much importance, so little coverage.

https://www.battleforthenet.com/

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Silicon Valley is emerging as a political power center, and it's becoming very vocal.

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Blue Origin
Published on Dec 14, 2017

Footage taken from onboard cameras. Full mission recap:
New Shepard flew again for the seventh time on Dec. 12, 2017, from Blue Origin’s West Texas Launch Site. Known as Mission 7 (M7), the mission featured the next-generation booster and the first flight of Crew Capsule 2.0. Crew Capsule 2.0 features large windows, measuring 2.4 feet wide, 3.6 feet tall. M7 also included 12 commercial, research and education payloads onboard. Crew Capsule 2.0 reached an apogee of 322,405 feet AGL/326,075 feet MSL (98.27 kilometers AGL/99.39 kilometers MSL). The booster reached an apogee of 322,032 feet AGL/325,702 feet MSL (98.16 kilometers AGL/99.27 kilometers MSL).
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