Post has attachment
From the makers of the groundbreaking documentary "The Cove" comes a new film that is set to shake things up.

Post has attachment
Sylvia Earle’s commitment to representing the Ocean’s Call for Climate (initiated by the Ocean Climate Platform) reflects the strong mobilization of the international maritime community to push for recognition of the Ocean’s vital role in the fight against global warming at the COP21 conference in Paris.

Post has attachment
Ruth's team is trying to figure out why healthy brown corals thrive while those growing right next door turn white or bleach, a sign of stress.

Post has attachment
With the global oceans getting warmer and more acidic as they absorb heat and carbon dioxide, habitats and food webs are changing with them, a new perspective in the journal Science explains. The paper is part of a new special issue, looking at the oceans and climate change.

Post has attachment
Throughout recorded history, humans have forced the evolution of select plants and animals. Now, researchers at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology’s Gates Lab are using this technique, called “assisted evolution”, to create “super coral.”

Post has attachment
An increase in the water temperature of the world's oceans of around 6 °C could stop oxygen production by phytoplankton.

Post has attachment
The ocean is indeed in deep deep trouble due to overfishing, climate change, pollution, and habitat destruction, and good science is needed to turn that around. This science doesn’t need to be fancy, expensive, or complicated. Rather, it needs to be thoughtful, targeted, and inclusive.

Post has attachment
OMG! NASA has a new ocean ice-sheet research project!

Post has attachment
All that carbon in the atmosphere means hotter global temperatures and more severe weather, of course. But scientists have less of an idea of what climate change will do to the ocean—a complex, difficult-to-study realm that’s due for huge chemical and ecological shifts. And that’s worrying, because the oceans are also a big carbon sink and the source of sustenance for most life on Earth.

Post has attachment
Waters of the Gulf of Maine have warmed more rapidly during the past decade more than over 90 per cent of the global ocean and this warming is negatively impacting the cod population, while it has led to an increase in the lobster population.
Wait while more posts are being loaded