Post has attachment
This is why I love spiders - they eat all the bugs!
#spider #science for #SpiderSunday
So next time you think about squishing a friendly spiderbro, consider that the little fella will probably eat it's own body weight in mosquitos and other pests in about a week.
Via +Inanna Orbatos​

Post has attachment
https://youtu.be/A2eksLYTkKA

Argentine ant penis (Aedeagus), in erection.

Post has attachment
Photo

Post has attachment
Photo

Post has attachment
Stackalicious #2
 
 
Another attempt from my short and fast stacking session with dead ants. This here was a Campnotus ligniperdus queen that unfortunately died after I bought her.
Obviously, I'm still struggling with the same problems I had before (with it being the same session and all...), but I'm definitely not unhappy with the result. This was made with 104 individual shots, but I must add that quite a lot of those were duplicates. I had some problem with the stage, and often it did not move before I took a shot. I was too lazy to filter them out afterwards, and apparently it was not a big problem for the stacking software.
Photo

Post has attachment
green bottle fly
F11 - 1/160 - ISO 100 - MT24EX - MP-E 65mm
.. biological name Phaenicia sericata or Lucilia sericata is a blow fly 10–14 mm long (slightly larger than a house fly) with a brilliant, metallic, blue-green or golden coloration. Oh, The maggots (larvae) of the fly are used for maggot therapy... Thanks for that Wikipedia :-)
#Macro #Fly #MPE65


Photo

Post has attachment
Greetings from my friendly roommate
#Spider #SpiderSunday
My bedroom garden orb weaver is still in residence, building is web around my bed every night.
It's nice to not sleep alone :)
Photo

Post has attachment
Moving
 
Some of these Tapinoma ants were dragging brood around, but I'm not exactly sure if this one is carrying it too. It looks so sleek, and I'm more used to hairy larvae (and it looks too big for an egg too)
Photo

Post has attachment
Stackalicious
 
I made an attempt at a bit more serious stacking, using a stage constructed out of LEGOs and a stepper motor (not my own design). There are a few kinks, but on the whole it works fantastic. For this first try I used a dead ant queen I just "happened" to have lying around: a specimen of Lasius flavus that I picked up during a nuptial flight, but that failed to start a colony.
 
My setup was a full set of extension tubes, my Tamron 90mm, and the Raynox DCR250 converter to get a high magnification.
Here I set the camera to F/4.5 and tried to take small steps to take 54 individual frames (I can't step fix distances with this stage, yet, so I just give it a quick burst with a joystick). After fixing the lighting a bit in the Raw bit of Photoshop, I saved them as jpegs and tried Zerene Stacker for the first time. Also tried it in Photoshop itself, but that didn't turn out very well. Zerene worked like a charm, I'm guessing I'll probably get a license after this try.
 
One thing I'm struggling with is the fuzziness. Even the individual frames are not that sharp. Should I be shooting at different apertures? I'd love it if someone with more experience could weigh in. Is it the glass setup? Should I be looking into getting a microscope objective? I already have an EF-to-C-mount converter, if that helps.
Either way, I'm not that unhappy with the endresult!
Photo

Post has attachment
My friendly bedroom orb weaver is still making his web every night, though it's begun encroaching more and more on my space. Now I wake up every morning tangled in web and I have to break my poor spiderbro's work. But the web gets rebuilt while I sleep and my little friend keeps me safe from mosquitoes :)
Happy #SpiderSunday
#spider
Photo
Wait while more posts are being loaded