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My monster fish are settled in and loving their new home!

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Queen Angelfish Holacanthus ciliaris are incredibly colorful reef fish. With electric blue bodies, blazing yellow tails, and light purple and orange highlights, Queen angelfish are among the most strikingly colorful of all reef fishes. Their adornments seem like they would bring a lot of attention, but they actually blend in well when hiding amid the exotic reef colors.

Queen Angelfish mostly feed on sponges and algae, but they will also look for sea fans, soft corals, and sometimes jellyfish. They are shy fish, found either alone or often in pairs in the warm waters of the Caribbean and western Atlantic.

Because of their incredible colors, these fish are widely harvested for the aquarium trade. Since they are common throughout their range and don't appear to be in any immediate threat of decline, they have no special protections or status.

Learn more about the incredible marine life in our world's oceans by visiting us at: www.theterramarproject.org

Photo: Stan Shebs/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 2.0)

#marinelife #queen #angelfish #fish #marineconservation #savethesea #savethefish #reef #seahope #seachange #seafuture #ocean
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Beaked Coralfish
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Babies!

I used to have five, down to four, kind of defeats the purpose of me giving them a 20-gallon long tank, though. Oh well, they are sharing it with their dad actually. I am going to add a group of neon tetras to bring them out more.
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What's up everybody check out the aquariums

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#SharkWeek is in full swing! Check out these #Jawsome shark FACTS by the #SharkLeague, a coalition focused on responsible regional conservation of sharks & rays http://bit.ly/2uUMaa3
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Speaking of ocean apex predators, new research from our tuna scientists and their partners at Stanford University reveals that tuna have a secret tool that helps them make precise movements as they zoom through the sea—their very own hydraulic system!

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Well hello there little puffling! We're excited to announce the hatching of the newest tufted puffin chick (puffling)!

This puffling, who watched on July 22, is the fourth chick we've had in the past three years. The parents will be bringing fish to the puffling in the burrow for the next few weeks—keep an eye out for mom and dad taking turns collecting a bill full of food during their daily feeds. For both wild chicks and those born at the Aquarium, the first few months of their lives are critical and their immune system will continue to strengthen as they grow to adulthood. Our staff will monitor the chick closely, and if all continues to go well with growth and development, we might see the adult-sized chick starting to venture outside the burrow when it’s approximately 45 days old.
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Right Whales Need Our Help—Right Now
8 died in St Lawrence river recently, 4 from human causes, 4 from yet unknown causes. Only maybe 500 left. Very few new births.


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Corals are incredible creatures that form the base of the most biodiverse places in our world's oceans. Coral polyps, small soft-bodied organisms related to sea-anemones and jellyfish, actually build the coral reefs that provide crucial habitat for countless other marine life.

Reefs begin when a polyp attaches itself to a rock or the sea floor, and then divides itself into thousands of clones. The living colony of coral polyps build up over time and act as a single organism. The polyps, as they grow, form a hard limestone skeleton called a calicle which creates the structure of the coral reef.

Coral polyps rely on a crucial symbiotic relationship with zooxanthelle, an algae that lives within the polyps. The polyp provides the zooxanthellae with a home, while in return the zooxanthellae feed the corals through photosynthesis during the day. At night corals can extend their venomous tentacles to catch passing organisms, however the energy from the zooxanthellae is crucial to their survival.

When stressed by such things as temperature change or pollution, corals will evict their boarders, causing coral bleaching that can kill the colony if the stress is not mitigated.

Learn more about the incredible marine life in our world's oceans by visiting us at: www.theterramarproject.org

Photo: G. P. Schmahl/NOAA/Wikimedia Commons (CC0)

#coralreefs #coral #chasingcoral #seahope #climatechange #coralbleaching #saveourocean #vitaminsea #conservation #oceanacidification 
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