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One of the best things about blacksmithing is when a customer asks for something "a little different".

Sure enough, a very nice lady wanted something a little different for her viking boyfriend and came up with a bind rune design she liked. All I had to do was forge a bit of steel, carve it, and get it in the mail ASAP so it'd make it there before his birthday.

As you can see, it's a good bit larger than my standard pendants, but that was necessary so the rune didn't look "forced". And since her ol' man is 6'3" and 300 pounds of muscle, it'll look right when he wears it.

Forging the steel so it has that weathered and worn look isn't easy, but the carving of the runes is where the real challenge lies. I screwed up the first go at it when the lines went a hair wonky on me and refused to line up at the main juncture. It looked horrible, so there was nothing to do but forge another piece of steel and start carving all over again.

Lots of work, but well worth it in the end. The customer was happy, her boyfriend was happy, and all that makes me very happy.
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11/3/17
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Happy Thorsday All

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Religions are a set of fables to unite a clan or a people. Some fables may even have similarities with fables which seem to be borrowed from other clans, people or regions.

This story from Voluvspo may be the origin of the story about King Arthur and the sword in the stone:

It is told that one evening a stranger [probably Odin] came into the hall. He wore a hooded cape. He was very tall and had only one eye. He approached the tree Barnstock, then drew a sword and thrust it up to the hilt into the trunk, saying, "I give this sword to whoever can pull it from the tree."

With this he turned and walked away. No one knew who he was or where he went.

You can read a summary in English from Voluvspo here:
http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/volsungsaga.html
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Odin says, "If evil thou knowest, as evil proclaim it, and make no friendship with foes."
Hávamál (Sayings of the High One)
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Happy Thorsday All
Happy Thors-day EE 👊👊👊
one more day!!! You can do this🍻
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THOR IS STRONGEST THERE IS
from Snorri Sturluson's EDDA*
Then said Gangleri: "What are the names of the other Æsir, or what is their office, or what deeds of renown have they done?"

Hárr answered: "Thor is the foremost of them, he that is called Thor of the Æsir, or Öku-Thor. He is strongest of all the gods and men.

"He has his realm in the place called Thrúdvangar [Power-Field], and his hall is called Bilskirnir [Lightning-Crack]. In that hall are five hundred rooms and forty. That is the greatest house that men know of. It is thus said [by Odin] in Grímnismál [Sayings of the Masked One]:

Five hundred floors and more than forty,
So reckon I Bilskirnir with bending ways;
Of those houses that I know of hall-roofed,
My son's I know the most.

"Thor has two he-goats, that are called Tooth-Gnasher and Tooth-Gritter, and a chariot wherein he drives, and the he-goats draw the chariot. Therefore is he called Öku-Thor [Driving-Thor].

"He has also three things of great price: one is the hammer Mjölnir [Crusher], which the Frost-Giants and the Hill-Giants know, when it is raised on high; and that is no wonder, it has bruised many a skull among their fathers or their kinsmen.

"He has a second costly thing, best of all: the girdle of might; and when he clasps it about him, then the godlike strength within him is increased by half.

"Yet a third thing he has, in which there is much virtue: his iron gloves. He cannot do without them when he uses his hammer-shaft.

"But no one is so wise that he can tell all his mighty works; yet I can tell thee so much tidings of him that the hours would be spent before all that I know were told."

* Download a FREE eBook of the Edda (and many other books and articles) at The Norse Mythology Online Library: norsemyth.org/p/books.html
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HATERS OF GOLD AND KEEPERS OF BREAD
norsemyth.org/2017/07/haters-of-gold-and-keepers-of-bread.html
Every day brings new revelations of unchecked greed and deep corruption at the highest levels of power. What is a leader? What does it mean to rule over others? My new article turns to Old Norse and Old English for insight into the roots of our concepts.
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A VIKING, A SWORD, AND A DOG
Abridged from Iceland Magazine
Archeologists working at a large burial site in Eyjafjörður in north Iceland announced that they discovered the remains of a ship burial dating to the Viking age. A wealthy chieftain seems to have been buried in one of his boats with some possessions, including a sword and his dog.

The grave is believed to date to the 9th or 10th centuries. The sword, found close to the surface, is in very poor condition.

The archeological dig takes place north of the town of Akureyri at a site believed to have been of enormous local importance during the Viking Age. A few hundred meters south of the burial site is Gáseyri, which was the primary trading post in Eyjafjörður during the Viking a
Age.

The area where the ship burial was found is known as Dysnes, a name which points to Viking age graves, as dys is an old word for burial mound. The word Dysnes could be translated to "Burial ness". The precise location of the boat grave is then known as Kumlateigur, kuml being another old word for burial, and Kumlateigur translating as "Burial stretch". Both place names are ancient and point to more than one grave.

Eleven years ago a second boat burial was discovered at Kumlholt ("Burial hill") just south of the present site. Archeologists expect to find more graves as they explore the site fully.

While it was common to bury wealthy chiefs in boat burials during the Viking age, relatively few boat graves have been excavated in Iceland. One possible explanation is that boats were too valuable, with extremely limited domestic sources of timber for boat-building. Discovering Viking age graves with swords is similarly uncommon. Both finds point to the burial site of a wealthy local chief.

Source: icelandmag.visir.is/article/archaeologists-n-iceland-discover-viking-age-chief-buried-ship-his-sword-and-dog
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