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Ah, always a pleasure to read about advancements in tyrannosaur research...

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Meadow of dancing brittle stars shows evolution at work | #Geology #GeologyPage

Newly-described fossil shows how brittle stars evolved in response to pressure from predators, and how an ‘evolutionary hangover’ managed to escape them.

Read more : http://www.geologypage.com/2017/08/meadow-dancing-brittle-stars-shows-evolution-work.html

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So you figured it out..You cheater. New one for ya! What is this DINOSAUR?

This one is really easy...

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stařešinové
http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/vendian/critters.html

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A Giganotosaurus skeleton Fossil | #Geology #GeologyPag #Fossil

One of the world's largest terrestrial carnivores

Found at the museum of Villa El Chocón, next to the hydroelectric dam of El Chocón, Neuquén Province, Argentina.

Photo Copyright © Pablo Flores/flickr

Geology Page
www.geologypage.com

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This definitely makes a lot of sense to me...

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Mechanisms explaining positional diversity of the hindlimb in tetrapod evolution | #Geology #GeologyPage

In the evolution of tetrapods, the position of the hindlimb has diversified along with the vertebral formula, which is the number of small bones forming the vertebra.

Read more : http://www.geologypage.com/2017/08/mechanisms-explaining-positional-diversity-hindlimb-tetrapod-evolution.html

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An Overview of Earth's Major 'Mass Extinction' Events
Most scientists agree that a "mass extinction" event is underway with the Earth's wildlife disappearing at an alarming rate, mainly due to human activity. Scientists warn overpopulation, overconsumption by the wealthiest and assaults on biodiversity are pus...

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Edmontonia rugosidens’s most distinguishing characteristic may be its back, which served as armor for the dinosaur. Bony plates called osteoderms covered this animal from the Late Cretaceous (about 100 to 66 million years ago). The osteoderms weren’t bound together, which allowed a certain flexibility and helped prevent puncture wounds from predators. Spikes along the dinosaurs’ sides added protection. Edmontonia is classified as a nodosaurid ankylosaur, and lacks the weapon-like club tail that relatives such as Ankylosaurus had. Instead, Edmontonia’s tails featured a row of triangular spikes that were perhaps used to slash aggressors. A keen sense of smell also aided these herbivores, helping them both avoid predators and find food. Edmontonia roamed Canada as well as other parts of North America and is in fact named for Edmonton, the capital of Alberta, where it was first discovered.

Read more about Edmontonia and other dinosaurs: https://goo.gl/RmHwE6

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Where did Beyonder go? He was way better than freaking satan dude. His arguments actually made sense.
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