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the X-59 could take its first flight in 2021 if all goes according to plan.
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Wingu

Wingu is the grandson of Mike. And is part of this blog: Mike & Co
https://anjawessels.photography/mike-co-gb/

More softer photos of this chimp in this blog:
https://anjawessels.photography/wingu-gb/

CAMERA: Canon EOS 80D/650D
LENS Tamron 16-300mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC PZD Macro

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#photography #animal #zoo #Artis #chimp #chimpanzee #primate #dierenparkamersfoort #Wingu #aap #ape
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#Florida 11/23/2018 - First City Lights Festival Lighting Ceremony, Pensacola - First City Lights Festival Lighting Ceremony, Downtown Pensacola Event Date: Friday, November 23 Event Time: 5pm- 9pm Event Location: Downtown Pensacola, S. Palafox Place, Pensacola, FL 32502 Description: First City Lights Festival Lighting Ceremony in Downtown Pensacola. Are you ready to light up downtown Pensacola? Join us and Winterfest on the day after Thanksgiving immediately following the Elf Parade! The G...

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Fire Station
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{ From The Clothesline }
Stolen Moments
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Aquaman has been spearedtridented by Poseidon! Why would the decrepit old sea god do such a thing? Not cool, bro! See if Wonder Woman beats the bags out from under his eyes, in Justice League #12! A great story I’ve been loving Drowned Earth—it’s the best…
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Conversation 2
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McGahn Wouldn’t Lock Up Hillary. So Trump Hired Whitaker. https://nym.ag/2R1i102
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Here's your look at three of the best costumes from this week's comic releases: http://bit.ly/2PIKefQ
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A Florida woman was captured on police body camera video dropping a baby on its head, fracturing the infant's skull, while running away from police: http://on.nbc10.com/UPyPfvR
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Astronomers Discover Our Sun’s Long-lost Identical 'Twin'

In a new study, astronomers from the Institute of Astrophysics and Space Sciences in Portugal, using the latest methods and the latest data from the Gaia space telescope, found the “twin” of the Sun.

Scientists discovered an almost identical twin to our sun HD 186302 at a distance of 184 light years from Earth, which could appear with the Sun from a single star-forming cloud 4.57 billion years ago. The "twins" have similar size, surface temperature, spectral class and chemical composition. Astronomers will continue to research HD 186302 to learn more about the past of the Sun, as well as to find new Earth-like planets.

Stars form in giant clouds of dust and gas, the mass of which is hundreds of thousands of times greater than the sun. At the same time, most of the luminaries are born in pairs - at a distance of 500 astronomical units (about 75 billion km) from each other. According to expert estimates, up to 85% of all stars are in binary, and perhaps even in triple or quadruple systems. Given this, scientists have always thought it strange that the sun does not have a pair.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-11-solar-sibling-identical-sun.html#jCp
https://www.rt.com/news/444436-suns-long-lost-sibling/

The article was published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.
https://www.aanda.org/articles/aa/abs/2018/11/aa34285-18/aa34285-18.html

Clip, images credit: NASA/KEPLER, SDO, ESA/HUBBLE & ESO

Music credit: YouTube Audio Library
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This is what happens when you forget to turn off the red LED on your headlamp, you get a cool pic!
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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos is donating $97.5 million to 24 groups around the country that help homeless families, including two Virginia charities. https://trib.al/PyU4Pis
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this sounds like something our conspiracy friends would come up with..
but you have to ask where the poop came from that is on the windshield
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Expect a shot to hurt and it probably will, even if the needle poke isn’t really so painful. Brace for a second shot and you’ll likely flinch again, even though, second time around, you should know better..
That’s the takeaway of a new brain imaging study published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour which found that expectations about pain intensity can become self-fulfilling prophecies. Surprisingly, those false expectations can persist even when reality repeatedly demonstrates otherwise, the study found.
We discovered that there is a positive feedback loop between expectation and pain said senior author Tor Wager a professor of psychology and neuroscience at the University of Colorado Boulder.
The more pain you expect, the stronger your brain responds to the pain. The stronger your brain responds to the pain, the more you expect.

For decades, researchers have been intrigued with the idea of self-fulfilling prophecy, with studies showing expectations can influence everything from how one performs on a test to how one responds to a medication. The new study is the first to directly model the dynamics of the feedback loop between expectations and pain and the neural mechanisms underlying it.
Marieke Jepma then a postdoctoral researcher in Wager’s lab, launched the research after noticing that even when test subjects were shown time and again that something wouldn’t hurt badly, some still expected it to.
We wanted to get a better understanding of why pain expectations are so resistant to change said Jepma, lead author and now a researcher at the University of Amsterdam.
The researchers recruited 34 subjects and taught them to associate one symbol with low heat and another with high, painful heat.
Then, the subjects were placed in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) machine, which measures blood flow in the brain as a proxy for neural activity. For 60 minutes, subjects were shown low or high pain cues (the symbols, the words Low or High, or the letters L and W), then asked to rate how much pain they expected.
Then varying degrees of painful but non-damaging heat were applied to their forearm or leg, with the hottest reaching “about what it feels like to hold a hot cup of coffee” Wager explains.
Then they were asked to rate their pain.
Unbeknownst to the subjects, heat intensity was not actually related to the preceding cue.

The study found that when subjects expected more heat, brain regions involved in threat and fear were more activated as they waited. Regions involved in the generation of pain were more active when they received the stimulus. Participants reported more pain with high-pain cues, regardless of how much heat they actually got.
This suggests that expectations had a rather deep effect, influencing how the brain processes pain said Jepma.
Surprisingly, their expectations also highly influenced their ability to learn from experience. Many subjects demonstrated high confirmation bias the tendency to learn from things that reinforce our beliefs and discount those that don’t. For instance, if they expected high pain and got it, they might expect even more pain the next time. But if they expected high pain and didn’t get it, nothing changed.
You would assume that if you expected high pain and got very little you would know better the next time. But interestingly, they failed to learn said Wager.
This phenomenon could have tangible impacts on recovery from painful conditions, suggests Jepma.
Our results suggest that negative expectations about pain or treatment outcomes may in some situations interfere with optimal recovery, both by enhancing perceived pain and by preventing people from noticing that they are getting better she said. Positive expectations, on the other hand, could have the opposite effects.
The research also may shed light on why, for some, chronic pain can linger long after damaged tissues have healed.
Whether in the context of pain or mental health, the authors suggest that it may do us good to be aware of our inherent eagerness to confirm our expectations.
Just realizing that things may not be as bad as you think may help you to revise your expectation and, in doing so, alter your experience said Jepma.
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