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#mma news Khabib Nurmagomedov announces ‘Khabib Time’ autobiography
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There are about two trillion galaxies approximately in our entire Universe. From colliding galaxy to interacting galaxy, here is a list of 10 most amazing galaxies in the universe.

https://rxscience.org/10-most-amazing-galaxies-in-the-universe/
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13 Best Android Apps of 2018

Fill up your phone or tablet with the best Android apps around now with 13 to pick from!

https://todaysintech.com/the-best-android-apps-of-2018/
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8 Things Your Ears Say About Your Health

Could your sore or ringing ears be a sign of something else? Find out more about what your ears can tell you about your health.

http://www.howfitness.info/what-your-ears-say-about-your-health/
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"did you write a letter to every Chris in Hollwood?!" XD

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Boxing Highlights 2 ... May 11th, 1994. On this day, one of the most historic moments in the sport took place with a fight billed as “One for the Ages’ where 45 year old former World Heavyweight Champion takes on a prime undefeated 26 year old Michael Moorer, who makes the 1st defenses of his IBF and WBA Heavyweight Titles. Moorer who had 18 years on Foreman was also a 3-1 betting favorite ... 8 out of 10

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The 3,000ft-high Golden Bridge in Vietnam, which appears to be held up by two huge hands sticking out the side of a mountain, has become a major tourist destination within a month of opening.
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The Socotra Archipelago lies 380 km to the south of Ras Fartak on the Arabian Sea coast of Yemen. It includes a group of islands – Socotra, Darsa, Samha and Abd Al Kuri. The western-most point of the Archipelago is just 80 km east of Cape Guardafui on the Somalia Peninsula.
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Stan Lee does not need to be avenged, but he deserves to be remembered and celebrated. That’s exactly what the “Original 6” from Marvel Studios’ The Avengers have done. Scarlett Johansson, Chris Hemsworth, Mark Ruffalo, Robert Downey Jr., Jeremy Renner,…
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"This year the shower of shooting stars is expected to peak late Saturday night and into Sunday morning.
Always occurring in mid-November, an average of about 15 meteors per hour streak across the night sky during the shower's yearly peak, according to NASA.
The cascade will be competing with a waxing gibbous moon, so the best time to watch is after the moon has set but before dawn."
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"Male songbirds that had better early life conditions as nestlings sing more often and produce more complex songs as adults, according to a study by Lucy Magoolagan from Lancaster University, publishing November 14 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

Female songbirds are thought to judge a male's quality based on his skill at singing. The brain's song system develops during the nestling and fledgling period, so stress during this time, such as a lack food, might impair an adult's singing prowess—an idea known as the "developmental stress hypothesis". To test this hypothesis, the researchers monitored 18 nestlings in a long-term study population of wild white-throated dippers (Cinclus cinclus) living around the River Lune in Cumbria. They recorded brood size, the number of feeding visits by the parents and measured the nestlings' condition at 9 days old, and then returned to record the birds' song as adults.

They found that dippers that were healthier at 9 days old sang songs with more unique 'syllables' as adults, a measure of their singing repertoire. Nestlings that were fed more frequently also sang more often in adulthood. This is the first evidence from wild populations that food limitations during early life can influence song frequency and singing repertoire in adult birds, and supports previous experimental studies on captive European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), swamp sparrows (Melospiza georgiana), and song sparrows (Melospiza melodia)".

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Fake News Isn’t Just a Problem for Facebook. It’s Also a Solution! https://nym.ag/2DDdeiD
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The Dark Hedges is an avenue of beech trees along Bregagh Road between Armoy and Stranocum in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. The trees form an atmospheric tunnel that has been used as a location in HBO's popular television series Game of Thrones, which has resulted in the avenue becoming a tourist attraction.
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Are you feeling more tired than usual? Are you super hungry and thirsty lately? Do you have to urinate more frequently? These occurrences could all be early signs of type 2 diabetes.

https://medmd.org/5-surprising-symptoms-of-diabetes/
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The volcano Erta Ale is the most active volcano in Ethiopia. It is located below sea level in the desert of Danakil. The constant activity of the volcano continues since 1967. In the crater of the volcano, an amazingly beautiful lava lake could be seen. Periodically, lava flows away from it, forming rivers of fire.
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Hurricanes should, theoretically, be more intense and wetter on a hotter planet. After all, warm ocean water fuels hurricanes, and warmer air holds more moisture — which means more rain. Recent studies back that up; analyses of Hurricane Harvey, for instance, reported that 15 percent or more of the rainfall could be attributed to global warming.
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Dogs can sense if someone is untrustworthy, according to science
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Massive impact crater from a kilometre-wide iron meteorite discovered in Greenland
Source: Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen
An international team lead by researchers from the Centre for GeoGenetics at the Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen have discovered a 31-km wide meteorite impact crater buried beneath the ice-sheet in the northern Greenland. This is the first time that a crater of any size has been found under one of Earth’s continental ice sheets. The researchers worked for last three years to verify their discovery, initially made in the 2015. The research is described in a new study just published in the internationally recognized journal Science Advances.

The crater measures more than 31 km in diameter, corresponding to an area bigger than Paris, and placing it among the 25 largest impact craters on Earth. The crater formed when a kilometre-wide iron meteorite smashed into northern Greenland, but has since been hidden under nearly a kilometre of ice.

- The crater is exceptionally well-preserved, and that is surprising, because glacier ice is an incredibly efficient erosive agent that would have quickly removed traces of the impact. But that means the crater must be rather young from a geological perspective. So far, it has not been possible to date the crater directly, but its condition strongly suggests that it formed after ice began to cover Greenland, so younger than 3 million years old and possibly as recently as 12,000 years ago – toward the end of the last ice age, says Professor Kurt H. Kjær from the Centre for GeoGenetics at the Natural History Museum of Denmark.

Giant circular depression
The crater was first discovered in July 2015 as the researchers inspected a new map of the topography beneath Greenland's ice-sheet. They noticed an enormous, but previously undetected circular depression under Hiawatha Glacier, sitting at the very edge of the ice sheet in northern Greenland.

- We immediately knew this was something special but at the same time it became clear that it would be difficult to confirm the origin of the depression, says Professor Kjær.

In the courtyard at the Geological Museum in Copenhagen just outside the windows of the Centre for GeoGenetics sits a 20-tonne iron meteorite found in North Greenland not far from the Hiawatha Glacier.

- It was therefore not such a leap to infer that the depression could be a previously undescribed meterorite crater, but initially we lacked the evidence, reflects Associate Professor Nicolaj K. Larsen from Aarhus University.

The crucial evidence
Their suspicion that the giant depression was a meteorite crater was reinforced when the team sent a German research plane from the Alfred Wegener Institute to fly over the Hiawatha Glacier and map the crater and the overlying ice with a new powerful ice radar. Joseph MacGregor, a glaciologist at NASA, who participated in the study and is an expert in ice radar measurements adds:

- Previous radar measurements of Hiawatha Glacier were part of a long-term NASA effort to map Greenland’s changing ice cover. What we really needed to test our hypothesis was a dense and focused radar survey there. Our colleagues at the Alfred Wegener Institute and University of Kansas did exactly that with a next-generation radar system that exceeded all expectations and imaged the depression in stunning detail. A distinctly circular rim, central uplift, disturbed and undisturbed ice layering, and basal debris. It’s all there.

In the summers of 2016 and 2017, the research team returned to the site to map tectonic structures in the rock near the foot of the glacier and collect samples of sediments washed out from the depression through a melt water channel.

- Some of the quartz sand washed from the crater had planar deformation features indicative of a violent impact, and this is conclusive evidence that the depression beneath the Hiawatha Glacier is a meteorite crater, says Professor Larsen.

The consequences of the impact on the Earth’s climate and life
Earlier studies have shown that large impacts can profoundly affect Earth’s climate, with major consequences for life on Earth at the time. It is therefore very reasonable to ask when and how and this meteorite impact at the Hiawatha Glacier affected the planet.

- The next step in the investigation will be to confidently date the impact. This will be a challenge, because it will probably require recovering material that melted during the impact from the bottom of the structure, but this is crucial if we are to understand how the Hiawatha impact affected life on Earth, concludes Professor Kjær.

Journal Reference:
Kurt H. Kjær, Nicolaj K. Larsen, Tobias Binder, Anders A. Bjørk, Olaf Eisen, Mark A. Fahnestock, Svend Funder, Adam A. Garde, Henning Haack, Veit Helm, Michael Houmark-Nielsen, Kristian K. Kjeldsen, Shfaqat A. Khan, Horst Machguth, Iain McDonald, Mathieu Morlighem, Jérémie Mouginot, John D. Paden, Tod E. Waight, Christian Weikusat, Eske Willerslev, Joseph A. MacGregor. A large impact crater beneath Hiawatha Glacier in northwest Greenland. Science Advances, 2018; 4 (11): eaar8173
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.aar8173

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#US media in court showdown over White House access https://goo.gl/GnP6pj
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