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SOCIALIST ACTIVIST WHO HARASSED HOMELAND SECURITY SECRETARY WORKS FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
7:56 PM 06/20/2018 | Joe Simonson | Media Reporter | The Daily Caller

One of the activists who chased Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen out of a Mexican restaurant Tuesday night over the Trump administration’s immigration policies is an employee of the Department of Justice, The Daily Caller News Foundation has confirmed.

Members of the Washington, D.C., chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America crashed Nielsen’s meal with a demonstration full of chants and other outbursts.

One of those participants, Allison Hrabar, actually works for the Trump administration — as a paralegal in the DOJ.

Read More:
http://dailycaller.com/2018/06/20/socialist-activist-kirstjen-nielsen-doj/

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Giancarlo Stanton finally has his first Yankees moment https://nyp.st/2M73IV4

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Supposed protoype of the Galaxy S10 leaked showing a near bezel-less display- Technology News, Firstpost

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Amazon, Berkshire, JPMorgan name Atul Gawande CEO of healthcare venture

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This is how you can stay safe when using your computer.

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Beautiful song im going to go see her n Luke Bryan in Oct.

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Recruiters: streamline the process of scheduling with Hire's new features, powered by machine learning. 🗓️📃📞

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“You would think you would get hit by a baseball,” the woman said. “Instead of a flying hot dog.”

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No, iPhones are not the best.

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https://insights.ubuntu.com/2018/06/20/report-from-the-gnome-software-design-sprint/

source: planet ubuntu

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View of Glen Valley farmland, the Fraser River, and Coquitlam/Burnaby Mountain from Bradner Road in Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada.

More photos here: https://www.mrussellphotography.com/blog/glen-valley-farmland-fraser-river/

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"The Himalayan Range includes some of the youngest and most spectacular mountains on Earth, but the rugged landscape that lends it the striking beauty for which it is known can also keep scientists from fully understanding how these mountains formed. "We know more about the rocks on parts of Mars than we do about some of the areas in the Himalaya," said Dr. Alka Tripathy-Lang.

"Many researchers have done extraordinary geologic mapping in this rugged region, but the fact is that some places are just completely inaccessible because of topography, elevation, or geopolitical issues. The rocks in those areas are an important piece of the tectonic puzzle and are important for understanding the way the region evolved," said Dr. Wendy Bohon. "The tools we used, originally developed for mapping rocks on Mars, were a way to safely access information about the rocks in the Himalayas."

Bohon and colleagues worked with researchers at the Mars Space Flight Facility at Arizona State University to use data from the Earth orbiting satellite Terra in the same way planetary geologists have been using data from the Mars orbiting satellite Odyssey.

The researchers relied on the fact that every mineral has a unique spectral "signature," where some parts of the thermal infrared spectrum are absorbed and some parts are reflected. Rocks are made of different combinations of minerals, so when all of these mineral signatures are combined, they reveal the rock type. To easily distinguish between different kinds of rocks the researchers translated these signals into red/green/blue imagery, which results in a distinguishable color for each rock type that can be used to map the distribution of rocks throughout the region.

To double-check that the colors they're mapping are truly the rock type predicted by the imagery, the researchers took hand samples from accessible locations in the study area to the laboratory and measured the spectral signatures of each rock using a thermal emission spectrometer. Then they compared these laboratory signatures to those collected from the ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) instrument on the Terra satellite. They matched. "There is some variation between the lab and ASTER spectral signatures due to different factors like weathering and the averaging area, but overall the match between them was surprisingly consistent," said Tripathy-Lang".

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Impressive, sure but practical? only time will tell.

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"The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy released a new report today (June 20) titled the "National Near-Earth Object Preparedness Strategy and Action Plan." The 18-page document outlines the steps that NASA and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will take over the next 10 years to both prevent dangerous asteroids from striking Earth and prepare the country for the potential consequences of such an event."

https://www.space.com/40943-nasa-asteroid-defense-plan.html

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Trump Praises Murderous Dictator Kim Jong Un And His Mob Of Rally-Goers Blindly Cheers Him On: On Wednesday in Duluth, Trump supporters again proved that they would happily follow this president off a cliff if he asked them. The post Trump Praises Murderous Dictator Kim Jong Un And His Mob Of Rally-Goers Blindly Cheers Him On appeared first on POLITICUSUSA.

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When 'smaller government' really means doubling inadequacy is profitable?

https://plus.google.com/118077931144377065433/posts/W6X3c5rtQ8d

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"Health impacts of neonicotinoids may go well beyond bees, according to a new University of Guelph study.

U of G researchers found residues of the insecticides in the livers of wild turkeys, providing evidence that this common agrochemical is being ingested by free-ranging animals.

The researchers from the Ontario Veterinary College are among the first to study the broader effects of neonics on wildlife.

Published in Environmental Science and Pollution Research, the study showed that nearly 10 of the 40 wild turkey carcasses tested had detectable levels of neonicotinoids in their livers. Two types of the insecticide were found in some birds.

The researchers also found corn and soybean seeds coated with the insecticide in the digestive system of some birds.

"Wild turkeys supplement their diet with seeds from farm fields," said pathobiology professor Claire Jardine. She conducted the study with former pathobiology professor Nicole Nemeth, who is now at the University of Georgia, pathobiology PhD Amanda MacDonald, and Philippe Thomas, a wildlife toxicologist with Environment and Climate Change Canada.

"There has been growing concern among natural resource managers, conservationists and hunters about whether the use of neonics may be linked to poor reproductive output of wild turkeys."

While researchers have focused on health risks of neonicotinoids to bees, studying exposure levels in larger wildlife species is critical in understanding wider impacts on migratory behaviour, reproduction and mortality, said Jardine.

"Our results serve as baseline data for southern Ontario wild turkeys and provide context for reference values in future analyses."

MacDonald began the study after officials with the Ontario Federation of Hunters and Anglers called for research into the potential threat posed by neonics to wild turkeys".

(Posted by +rasha kamel )

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ACLU to continue lawsuit over Trump policies toward immigrant families: The American Civil Liberties Union on Wednesday said it plans to continue pursuing its lawsuit challenging U.S. President Donald Trump's policies concerning the treatment of immigrant families trying to enter the country. The post ACLU to continue lawsuit over Trump policies toward immigrant families appeared first on POLITICUSUSA.

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"Vegetation plays an important role in shaping local climate: just think of the cool shade provided by a forest or the grinding heat of the open desert.

But what happens when widespread changes, caused by or in response to global warming, take place across larger areas? Global climate models allow researchers to play out these kinds of thought experiments. The answers that result can serve as a warning or a guide to help policymakers make future land use decisions.

With this as a backdrop, a team of researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology and Justus-Liebig University Giessen in Germany decided to use a regional climate model to see what would happen if land use in Europe changed radically. They looked what would happen with air temperature, precipitation, and temperature extremes if Europe were completely deforested to either bare land or just ground vegetation. They also considered what might happen if Europe's cropland were converted to either evergreen or deciduous forests.

The researchers knew that climate change impacts tend to be underestimated at a regional level, "because the projected global mean temperature changes are dampened by averaging over the oceans, and are much smaller than the expected regional effects over most land areas," the team wrote in their paper, recently published in Environmental Research Letters. (This applies to both mean and extreme effects, as changes in regional extremes can be greater than those in global mean temperature up to a factor of three)."

(Posted by +rasha kamel )

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Google adding 'distributed by Google Play' metadata to APKs. https://google.com/newsstand/s/CBIwgqDi2Ds
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