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Ancient Mars could have had life - SpaceTime with Stuart Gary S21E83 +YouTube edition now available - stream episodes on demand from www.spacetimewithstuartgary,com

#astronomy #space #science #news #podcast #astrophysics
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What goes into the fight scenes of "Marvel's Daredevil" Season 3? Learn how the action sequences all come together with showrunner Erik Oleson: http://bit.ly/2NYXmHO
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The most amazing and the newest video, water coming from cycle handle... it is not magic, watch the full video to know the logic....
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A mud volcano or mud dome is a landform created by the eruption of mud or slurries, water and gases. Several geological processes may cause the formation of mud volcanoes. Mud volcanoes are not true igneous volcanoes as they do not produce lava and are not necessarily driven by magmatic activity. The Earth continuously exudes a mud-like substance, which may sometimes be referred to as a "mud volcano"......
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Muhammad Ali “The Greatest” Goes Toe-to-Toe with Football Star Lyle Alzado

In 1979, Ali signed to fight an eight-round exhibition in mid-July against Broncos defensive end Lyle Alzado at Mile High Stadium.
https://youtu.be/DYOBoQKy52s

#muhammadali #football #cassiusclay
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"Jupiter's icy moon Europa has a chaotic surface terrain that is fractured and cracked, suggesting a long-standing history of geologic activity.

A new series of four images of Europa taken with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has helped astronomers create the first global thermal map of this cold satellite of Jupiter. The new images have a resolution of roughly 200 kilometers, sufficient to study the relationship between surface thermal variations and the moon's major geologic features."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-10-alma-europa-temperature.html

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Airplane Drawing & Coloring
Watch Video - https://youtu.be/vknAIrTQne4
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Trump uses old Obama clip to make immigration point https://nyp.st/2EGco5V
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Meet the man behind the migrant caravan headed to US https://nyp.st/2EGSpnN
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After lighting the small tablets, the firework starts smoking and approx. a 2-foot snake of ash is expelled. They stay on the ground and do not emit sparks, flares, any form of projectiles, or any sound. They do emit a yellowish smoke. Black snakes are impressive and very safe, providing they are lit away from flammable material, thus making them especially suitable for young children.....
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On a clear night, you might be able to point out a few constellations — maybe the Big Dipper, Orion's Belt, and your Zodiac sign. But to see the Hulk and Albert Einstein, you're going to need help from a powerful space telescope. On June 11, 2008, NASA launched the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Every three hours, it produces a map of all the sources of gamma rays in the entire sky.

And now, these gamma ray sources have their own set of constellations.

⭐Patterns In The Noise⭐

Gamma rays are the highest-energy form of light, but we can't see them with our own eyes. That means the gamma-ray sky depicted in Fermi's maps looks a lot different from the sky we see when we look upward.

To date, Fermi has located about 3,000 sources of gamma rays, which include everything from rotating neutron stars to supermassive black holes. To celebrate the device's 10 years of hard work, the Fermi team decided to create a set of 21 constellations from among these 3,000 sources.

"Developing these unofficial constellations was a fun way to highlight a decade of Fermi's accomplishments," said Fermi project scientist Julie McEnery in a NASA news release.

"One way or another, all of the gamma-ray constellations have a tie-in to Fermi science."

🔭Science Meets Art🎨

The team had some fun with the project. They drew inspiration from everything from pop culture (the TARDIS from "Doctor Who, Star Trek's U.S.S. Enterprise) to science (Schrödinger's Cat, Albert Einstein) while conjuring up this new set of constellations.

You can view these newly identified constellations via an interactive website featuring artwork by illustrator Aurore Simonnet.

Click on a constellation, and you'll find a link to a page with information about the gamma ray sources within it, giving you a chance to bone up on your science while indulging in a little culture. (Check it out! Everything is within the post. 😁)



*This article was originally published by Futurism.

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In January last year, a rocket carrying a tiny chip packed with rubidium-87 atoms was launched more than 200 kilometres (124 miles) above the planet's surface. The mission was brief, affording just six minutes of microgravity at its height.

But in that time the tiny chip briefly held the record for being the coldest spot in space. On top of that, German researchers still managed to cram in more than 100 experiments. Their results are set to impact how we will one day study big things in the Universe.

The Matter-Wave Interferometry in Microgravity (MAIUS 1) experiment launched from Kiruna in Sweden was the first of several missions aiming to study a special state of matter called a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) under microgravity conditions.

Collections of atoms usually jiggle with energy in such a way that we can theoretically see them as individuals weaving through a crowd. Once that energy is taken away, they fall into a lull, for all purposes ending up with an identical set of characteristics, or quantum states. Rather than jump to their own beat, they become indistinguishable - a super particle with one identity.

This condensate is incredibly useful for physicists wishing to probe the deeper nature of how particles behave.

Forcing particles to be quiet typically entails holding them in an electromagnetic trap while carefully tuned lasers strike them with perfect timing, a little like hitting a person on a swing in such a way they slow down rather than speed up.

Once the atoms are quiet, the trap can be turned off and the experiment can begin. Just be quick – you need to catch the atom cloud before it drops to the bottom of the container. Without gravity ruining the party, researchers would have more time to conduct more complicated experiments.

MAIUS 1 is the first attempt to create a BEC in freefall. Usually, BECs need a room of equipment to cool atoms. So researchers from a number of German institutions had to first work together to miniaturise the setup.

The end result was a small chip containing atoms of rubidium, which could be packed inside a sounding rocket – an unpiloted research vessel – and shot up to a height of 243 kilometres (150 miles). At its summit, the chip cooled its contents to -273.15 degrees Celsius (-459.67 degrees Fahrenheit).

This is a degree colder than the Boomerang Nebula, which holds the honour of being the chilliest natural object we know of. So for a moment that cloud of rubidium atoms was literally the coldest known thing in space.

For six minutes, the rocket experienced minimal gravity, before accelerating back to Earth. In total, the research team poked and prodded the cloud 110 different ways to gauge how gravity affects the trapping and cooling process, and how this cloud behaves in freefall.

One particular set of experiments they ran could be immensely useful in the emerging study of gravitational waves. To detect the insanely tiny ripples in spacetime that echo from colliding monsters like black holes and neutron stars, astrophysicists currently split laser beams and recombine them. Discrepancies in their waves show as patterns of interference.

The results from their tests show that BECs could provide another way to detect these waves, and potentially pick up different frequencies to current procedures.

The researchers used a laser to split the cloud into two halves, and then allowed them to recombine. Since they should share the same quantum state – including its wave-like nature – any differences in the two when they merge could in principle indicate an external influence. Such as a change in their gravitational field.

On Earth, there just wouldn't be enough time to gather accurate readings. In freefall, the BEC could hang around long enough to potentially pick up gravitational waves, at least in theory.

Several months ago, NASA announced their own world first - the creation of a BEC in orbit on board the International Space Station (ISS). While it wasn't the first BEC to be created in a low g environment, the ISS's Cold Atom Laboratory is set to break its own records for duration of ultracold experiments.

And with more MAIUS missions on the horizon, all this ultra-cold research around the world is set to launch us into a new era of space exploration.

This research was published in Nature.

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Culture Dynamics DCI's #Leadership #Psychology training now available for public in Dec 2018 at Royale Chulan Hotel, #KualaLumpur. Follow the link below for more info and request for registration online or contact Culture Dynamics DCI for any further inquiry!

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How to Get a Satellite View of Your House Using Google Earth
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Scientists recently pointed the telescope at both Mars and Saturn to capture some new images as they make their closest approaches to Earth for the year, and NASA is now showing off their fancy photo skills.

https://todaysintech.com/mars-looks-so-weird-right-now/
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#TravelTuesday - Peeps asking why I keep going South. “WHY?!”, they demand to understand, trying to get their heads around my affliction, my polar fever - my MUSE, #Antarctica

“This expedition has everything – jaw dropping landscapes, whales galore, volcanoes, ice, ice and more ice of all kinds, berg, fast, sea, pancake, brash… forever sunsets, heroes, huts and of course, penguins….and I swear to God, the only thing missing was a unicorn. It’s big and sublime and magical and spiritual and superlative“ - Mark Vogler, “The Most Epic Journey In The World” with +Oceanwide Expeditions #beardedhomo #ICYMI

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Public
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60 Google Search Tips and Tricks #google #seo #search #tips #news
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10/23/2018 President Donald J.Trump Signed Into Law: S.3021, the "America's Water Infrastructure Act of 2018," which Authorizes Construction of Army Corps of Engineers water resources projects for flood risk management,navigation, hurrricane & storm damage risk reduction, & environmental restoration; modifies previously authorized projects; & contains other water-relaited provisions. That is Important Issue. #WHGov. You Tube.
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The Toronto Star's Daniel Dale explains the president's rising rate of false claims: "In 2017, he averaged 2.9 false claims per day. As of now, it's 4.5 false claims per day....And it's escalated even further as we have gotten closer to the midterms."
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