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Every Experience the Brain Perceives is Unique

Neuronal activity in the prefrontal cortex represents every experience as "novel." The neurons adapt their activity accordingly, even if the new experience is very similar to a previous one.

The research is in Nature Communications. (full open access)

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Say goodbye to Android Pay and hello to Google Pay

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Leaky faucet? No problem. Here’s how to clear it—plus 4 other DIY home-repair tips.

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REAL LIFE ROOMS: GARAGE DOOR CURB APPEAL DILEMMA

This home is already adorable, but I love experimenting with different options, and the style of this home was one I knew many people could relate to.

https://www.remodelaholic.com/garage-door-curb-appeal-paint-colors-real-life-rooms/ #curbappeal #homeimprovement #gardeningideas

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Brain Aging May Begin Earlier Than Expected

Physicists have devised a new method of investigating brain function, opening a new frontier in the diagnoses of neurodegenerative and ageing related diseases.

The research is in Scientific Reports. (full open access)

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Data detectives shift suspicions in Alzheimer's to inside villain

The mass pursuit of a conspicuous suspect in Alzheimer's disease may have encumbered research success for decades. Now, a new data analysis that has untangled evidence amassed in years of Alzheimer's studies encourages researchers to refocus their investigations. Heaps of plaque formed from amyloid-beta that accumulate in afflicted brains are what stick out under the microscope in tissue samples from Alzheimer's sufferers, and that eye-catching junk has long seemed an obvious culprit in the disease. But data analysis of the cumulative evidence doesn't back up so much attention to that usual suspect, according to a new study from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Though the bad amyloid-beta protein does appear to be an accomplice in the disease, the study has pointed to a more likely red-handed offender, another protein-gone-bad called phosphorylated tau (p-tau). What's more, the Georgia Tech data analysis of multiple studies done on mice also turned up signs that multiple biochemical actors work together in Alzheimer's to tear down neurons, the cells that the brain uses to do its work.Suspect line-up: P-tau implicated, plaque not so much: And the corrupted amyloid-beta that appeared more directly in cahoots with p-tau in the sabotage of brain function was not tied up in that plaque. In the line-up of the biochemical suspects examined, principal investigator Cassie Mitchell, an assistant professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University, said the data pointed to a pecking order of culpability. "The most important one would be the level of phosphorylated tau present. It had the strongest connection with cognitive decline," Mitchell said. "The correlation with amyloid plaque was there but very weak; not nearly as strong as the correlation between p-tau and cognitive decline."

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Swype hasn't been spectacular in a long time, but its impact on Android and mobile typing in general is undeniable.

I decided to write a little eulogy. (Warning: Lots of "early days of Android" memories within.)

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If you’re looking for an easy way to edit application launchers and menu entries on Ubuntu you’ll want to check out AppEditor. AppEditor is an easy to use Alacarte has been the go-to menu editor for almost as long as I’ve been using Ubuntu. It’s still…

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How to design an OS for the future

http://pocketnow.com/2018/02/20/design-os-for-future

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trees at the lake

#hqsplandscape +HQSP Landscape
#btplandscapepro +BTP Landscape Pro
#treetuesday by +Ralph Mendoza +Tree Tuesday

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Josh Duhamel brings flowers to Fergie after national anthem flub http://nyp.st/2ocvIge

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Brain Immune System is Key to Recovery from Motor Neuron Degeneration

The selective demise of motor neurons is the hallmark of Lou Gehrig’s disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Yet neurologists have suspected there are other types of brain cells involved in the progression of this disorder -- perhaps protection from it, which could light the way to treatment methods for the incurable disease. To get to the bottom of this question, researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania engineered mice in which the damage caused by a mutant human TDP-43 protein could be reversed by one type of brain immune cell. TDP-43 is a protein that misfolds and accumulates in the motor areas of the brains of ALS patients.

The research is in Nature Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

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Trump urges GOP to fight Pennsylvania's congressional map

President Donald Trump on Tuesday encouraged Republicans to fight Pennsylvania's new court-imposed map of congressional districts, issued a day earlier in a move expected to improve Democrats' chances at chipping away at the GOP's U.S. House majority.

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Mobile URL links are also converted to their standard (desktop) form when shared.  #News #Chrome

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Windows Phone is truly dead...

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http://www.elinuxbook.com/best-linux-chmod-command-with-examples/

BEST #LINUX #CHMOD #COMMAND WITH EXAMPLES

#elinuxbook #justlinux

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That's No Moon? Proposed Exomoon Defies Formation Theories

Last summer, scientists announced that they had found what could be the first moon to be spotted outside of the solar system. But new research on the supposed moon's evolution calls its existence into question.

If it does exist, the moon is most likely a large, Neptune-size object orbiting an even larger gas-giant star. But the unwieldy system strains understanding of how it may have formed, researchers have said.

In July 2017, scientists reluctantly announced the possible discovery of an exomoon. A candidate planet identified by NASA's Kepler telescope revealed lopsided dips in the light streaming from the planet's star, suggesting the possibility of a moon. After exomoon hunter David Kipping, of Columbia University in New York, requested time on the Hubble Space Telescope to follow up on the unusual activity, various media outlets probed the research. This led Kipping and Columbia's Alex Teachey, the lead scientist on the potential discovery, to announce the possibility of the first sighting of an exomoon.

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#NASCAR Less is more for Richard Childress Racing https://www.motorsport.com/nascar-cup/news/less-is-more-for-richard-childress-racing-1006944/ via @Motorsport_Oz

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#NASCAR Paul Menard: "It was huge" to have a shot at the 500 win https://www.motorsport.com/nascar-cup/news/paul-menard-we-had-a-shot-to-win-the-daytona-500-1007007/ via @Motorsport_Oz
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