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9 tips and tricks to improve your google search efficiency #google #tips #tricks #seo #news
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A-Rod wants to pay less child support now that he’s not a Yankee https://nyp.st/2D2V5un
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China slams US for using nuclear arms treaty with Russia as means to ‘blackmail’ Beijing
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"Marvel's Daredevil" Season 3 showrunner Erik Oleson gets real about Fisk and Dex and what comes next for them (spoilers ahead!): http://bit.ly/2OG9hzE
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Bizarre New Star Formation Casts Doubt on How the Solar System Formed

Everything we know about the formation of solar systems might be wrong, says University of Florida astronomy professor Jian Ge and his postdoc, Bo Ma. They’ve discovered the first “binary–binary” – two massive companions around one star in a close binary system, one so-called giant planet and one brown dwarf, or “failed star”

The first, called MARVELS-7a, is 12 times the mass of Jupiter, while the second, MARVELS-7b, has 57 times the mass of Jupiter.

Astronomers believe that planets in our solar system formed from a collapsed disk-like gaseous cloud, with our largest planet, Jupiter, buffered from smaller planets by the asteroid belt.

In the new binary system, HD 87646, the two giant companions are close to the minimum mass for burning deuterium and hydrogen, meaning that they have accumulated far more dust and gas than what a typical collapsed disk-like gaseous cloud can provide. They were likely formed through another mechanism. The stability of the system despite such massive bodies in close proximity raises new questions about how protoplanetary disks form.

Read more here: http://news.ufl.edu/articles/2016/10/first-pluto-now-this-discovery-of-first-binary-binary-calls-solar-system-formation-into-question.php

The research has been published in the Astronomical Journal.
https://arxiv.org/abs/1608.03597

Clips, images credit: ESO/L. Calçada/M. Kornmesser, ESA/HUBBLE & NASA / JPL-Caltech & nemesis maturity own work

Music credit: YouTube Audio Library
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Police probe hotel beef between Cowboys receiver, model https://nyp.st/2D242E9
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Researchers have identified a young star with four Jupiter and Saturn-sized planets in orbit around it, the first time that so many massive planets have been detected in such a young system.

https://todaysintech.com/giant-planets-discovery-near-young-star-leave-astronomers-stunned/
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About 29 million people around the world are affected by the disease "Alzheimer". In an international collaboration, scientists of the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz together with teams from Italy, Great Britain, Belgium and the USA are now working together on an approach for a therapy.
https://nano-magazine.com/news/2018/10/10/researchers-fight-alzheimers-disease-using-nanoparticles/?email=milana@macrosorb.org
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False claims, fraud, and tRUMP walks away with millions even after bankruptcy. He will do the same to America, and he is correct that people are let him do it... BONUS: Listen to Ivanka lie and backtrack just like her father.
#TrumpCrimeSyndicate #DonTheCon #MobBoss
#BedazzledBarbie #Ivanka #TreasonBarbie
https://youtu.be/1OYvuKC6-WQ
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"This image from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) shows the area surrounding Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole that lurks at the centre of the Milky Way—highlighted here with a small circle. New research has revealed exciting evidence of interstellar gas and dust orbiting the black hole at high speeds.

The molecular-hydrogen-rich gas clouds which have been identified are known as molecular cloudlets, and they have never before been unambiguously detected. This image actually shows the distribution of molecules including carbon monoxide, the cloudlets' second most abundant molecular component. The cloudlets lie 26 000 light-years away from us, orbiting fast and relatively close to the black hole, at a distance of about one light year. ALMA's high resolution allowed scientists to detect the cloudlets, which are the products of pre-existing massive clouds rotating around the centre of our galaxy. These clouds were tidally disrupted into dense fragments and a lower density, short-lived component. The latter was identified thanks to the signs left by the passage of the synchrotron radiation emitted by Sagittarius A* through diffuse gas between the cloudlets.

Although clouds of molecular gas have the potential to form new stars, these cloudlets are unlikely to create stellar newborns. They have a comparatively small mass of around 60 times that of the Sun, and exist close to the huge, turbulent, punishing gravitational forces exerted by Sagittarius A*.

While the stars orbiting Sagittarius A* have been systematically observed, these dense molecular cloudlets have not been detected so close to the centre of our galaxy before".

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Imagine dropping $1,000 only to stare at Booger McFarland for three hours.
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Death can be described as asynchronous, not all of the parts of the human body die at the same time after the heart stops functioning. For example, after the human brain ceases to function, with the assistance of a ventilator (respirator) for blood flow and oxygenation, many body organs such as the heart, lungs, cornea, liver, pancreas, small bowel, skin, tendons, kidney and bone may be kept viable long enough for the purposes of donation to save the life of another person.
A human limb can survive if kept cool immediately after amputation. An arm can be reattached successfully within three to four hours, and a finger up to eight hours after severance from the human body. But when does the brain actually stop functioning after the heart stops pumping oxygenated blood?
In the United States, all 50 states have legally defined death with neurological criteria, according to The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
Now scientists have observed that the human brain, like many other body parts, does not stop working immediately after the heart stops beating, and may still function for up to five minutes afterwards according to their study published in 2018 in the Annals of Neurology titled “Terminal spreading depolarization and electrical silence in death of human cerebral cortex.”

A research team led by professors Jens Dreier of Charité’s Center for Stroke Research, and Jed Hartings of the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Cincinnati, discovered that humans, like animals, undergo an event known as “terminal spreading depolarization” beginning within minutes of circulatory arrest. This discovery has important implications for survivable cerebral ischemic insults.
Following cardiac arrest, irreversible human brain damage occurs within an estimated 10 minutes due to the lack of oxygen. Within 20-40 seconds of oxygen deprivation, the brain becomes electrically inactive and interneuronal activity stops.
In a healthy, oxygenated human brain, ion gradients, the uneven distribution of ions between the inside and outside of nerve cells, are maintained. Within minutes, the brain’s ion gradient starts to deteriorate and depolarization spreads as a massive wave of electrochemical energy release in the form of heat called a brain tsunami.

As the energy loss is distributed through the cortex to other areas of the brain, pathophysiological cascades occur which gradually poison the nerve cells.
According to the research study this wave remains reversible up to a certain point in time: nerve cells will recover fully if circulation is restored before this point is reached.
According to Dreier Knowledge of the processes involved in spreading depolarization is fundamental to the development of additional treatment strategies aimed at prolonging the survival of nerve cells when brain perfusion is disrupted.
For cardiac arrest, medical professionals may try to resuscitate patients using various techniques such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and defibrillation.
This research may help in developing future medical technology and treatment to reverse the impact that disrupted circulation of oxygen has on the nerve cells of the human brain.
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Scientists will gather today to debate where NASA should next land on Mars, as the American space agency prepares a new mission in its search for life on the Red Planet.

https://rxscience.org/nasa-stronghold-about-life-on-mars/
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Nose Breathing Enhances Memory Consolidation

Breathing through the nose may improve the transfer of experience to long-term memory.

The research is in Journal of Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

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Targeting a Hunger Hormone to Treat Obesity

By blocking the binding of ghrelin to its receptor with a drug, one could theoretically reduce a person's feeling of hunger.

The research is in PNAS. (full access paywall)

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Louie Gohmert calls for RICO probe to find out who's paying for Honduras migrant caravan
By Monica Showalter | October 23, 2018 | American Thinker

Who's financing the Honduras migrant caravan of illegal immigrants, with as many as 10,000 snaking their way into illegally entering the U.S.?

Rep. Louie Gohmert of Texas has a sensible suggestion for finding out: using the RICO statutes. According to the Washington Examiner, citing Fox News, Gohmert said:

Read more:
https://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2018/10/louis_gohmert_calls_for_using_rico_to_find_out_whos_paying_for_the_honduras_migrant_caravan.html
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Piers Morgan: "The media hates him, Hollywood hates him but every hysterical piece of abuse they throw at him just makes Trump stronger and now the Democrats are heading for a midterms disaster..."
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6303125/PIERS-MORGAN-abuse-throw-Trump-makes-stronger-Democrats-heading-disaster.html
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#Basketball Article of the Day... October 23, 2018
Planning Practices

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Human brain cells have been found to carry electrical signals in a fashion that could significantly increase the power of individual neurons.
Comparing the speed of signals travelling down the branches of human neurons with similar cells taken from rats, researchers have found a difference in signal strength that hints at deeper processing.
New research led by scientists from MIT took advantage of an opportunity to retrieve a fingernail-sized sample of excitatory neurons from deep inside the brains of volunteers undergoing surgery for epilepsy.
The tissue was removed from a section of the anterior temporal lobe that could cope with the loss of a few neurons, so didn't affect the patients in any way.
But it did provide the researchers with the right kind of tissue to observe how human nerves manage to carry electrochemical messages across long distances.
It's no secret that despite being as smart as they are, rats have rather tiny brains with a comparatively thin outer cortex. (No offence to any rats reading this.)
But that thin outer layer is also organised in a similarly layered fashion to our own, raising the question of how our own neurons deal with sending signals over longer distances.
The text-book neuron typically resembles a tree stripped of its leaves. Branches called dendrites collect signals from other cells and transmit them down through a cell body into a long, slender trunk called an axon.

These transmissions are in the form of charged particles weaving in and out of the neuron's membrane through ion channels, producing ripples of voltage down the cell's length.
Yet those branches are more than conduits for signals, they actively tweak the message, playing a key role in the processing of the information they carry.
In some ways, we can think of dendrites as transistors, mediating signals by amplifying some and blocking others. It now seems they can also play an even more involved role in how our nervous system processes information, at least in humans.
It's not just that humans are smart because we have more neurons and a larger cortex says the study's lead scientist Mark Harnett.
From the bottom up, neurons behave differently.
Taking their sample of neurons from deep inside their volunteers' brains, the researchers immersed them in a spinal fluid-like medium to keep them alive for the next day or so, while they measured how signals travelled down their length.
Similar studies have already been carried out on rat neurons. But getting the same kind of cells out of living human brains hasn't been as easy.
These are the most carefully detailed measurements to date of the physiological properties of human neurons Nelson Spruston_ told MIT News Office's *Anne Trafton.
Spruston wasn't involved in the research, but as senior director of scientific programs at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Janelia Research Campus, he understands the significance of the study.
These kinds of experiments are very technically demanding, even in mice and rats, so from a technical perspective, it's pretty amazing that they've done this in humans.
With comparative studies on both animals, researchers have finally been able to share notes on whether a long distance sprint makes much of a difference in signal strength.
It turns out those signals do weaken over the distance of a human neuron, far more than they do in the same kinds of cells taken from rats.
Interestingly, both kinds of cells have the same number of ion channels in their membranes, which are simply spread out a little more in our neurons. Models developed by the researchers suggest this can account for the signal's differences.

In human neurons, there is more electrical compartmentalisation, and that allows these units to be a little bit more independent, potentially leading to increased computational capabilities of single neurons says Harnett.
Whether this architecture can explain differences in how our species processes information is left to be seen. But it's a hypothesis well worth exploring, according to Harnett.
If you have a cortical column that has a chunk of human or rodent cortex, you're going to be able to accomplish more computations faster with the human architecture versus the rodent architecture he says.
This research was published in Cell
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