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{ From The Clothesline }
Stolen Moments
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Conversation 2
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15 of the Best Plunging Necklines Worn by Celebrities in 2017
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Check out some of our best photos from Sunday's #SaluteToService win over the Panthers:

https://www.detroitlions.com/photos/lions-vs-panthers-cheer-photos


#Sports #NFL #Cheerleaders

(Credit: Detroit Lions Cheerleaders)
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12 minutes. Global warming is really cool! (((Everything is backwards!)))

Nice bit of data sets showing various falls of various empires and civilizations during cold periods. Looks likeca perfect time to import a bunch of gullible hot-blooded Latinos into north America! Can't have civil strife without loco Latinos! Eye yi yi!

So be sure to bury something really good for the archaeologists of the future!

I'm burying wheat! - don't worry I have a ice axe to dig out a portion.
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Why Don't We Try To Colonize The #Moon Instead Of #Mars? : http://sciabc.us/0Dez5
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7 Warning Signs of a Brain Tumour You Should Know

Does your head constantly hurt? Find out if that's a warning sign of a brain tumor.

https://www.medmd.org/7-warning-signs-of-a-brain-tumour-you-should-know/
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BREAKING: An Asteroid Is Going To Scoot Too Close To The Earth, So NASA Is Going To Nuke It!

'...And on that fateful day in 2135, there is a one in 2,700 chance that it will hit us. If that happens, the results will be catastrophic. For NASA, those odds are not good. MIT impact expert Richard Binzel told Buzzfeed that this is something that needs to be taken seriously — and is being taken seriously. “Smart people are taking this seriously and thinking carefully about what might be done.” So what’s the plan? Nukes, of course....'

http://www.thescinewsreporter.com/2018/09/breaking-asteroid-is-going-to-scoot-too_90.html?fbclid=IwAR18eS3dHp0CykBIwEQ2hMvZWKk4pWiqamREoylZb69y2wrfvbbj5wQqUis

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This is what happens when you forget to turn off the red LED on your headlamp, you get a cool pic!
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Sorry to deliver the news, but it’s time to worry about the next crash.
The combination of stagnant wages with most economic gains going to the top is once again endangering the economy.
Most Americans are still living in the shadow of the Great Recession that started in December 2007 and officially ended in June 2009. More have jobs, to be sure. But they haven’t seen any rise in their wages, adjusted for inflation.
Many are worse off due to the escalating costs of housing, healthcare, and education. And the value of whatever assets they own is less than in 2007.Which suggests we’re careening toward the same sort of crash we had then, and possibly as bad as 1929.
Clear away the financial rubble from those two former crashes and you’d see they both followed upon widening imbalances between the capacity of most people to buy, and what they as workers could produce. Each of these imbalances finally tipped the economy over.

The same imbalance has been growing again. The richest 1 percent of Americans now takes home about 20 percent of total income, and owns over 40 percent of the nation’s wealth.
These are close to the peaks of 1928 and 2007.
The underlying problem isn’t that Americans have been living beyond their means. It’s that their means haven’t been keeping up with the growing economy. Most gains have gone to the top.
But the rich only spend a small fraction of what they earn. The economy depends on the spending of middle and working class families.
By the first quarter of this year, household debt was at an all-time high of $13.2 trillion. Almost 80 percent of Americans are now living paycheck to paycheck.
It was similar in the years leading up to the crash of 2007. Between 1983 and 2007, household debt soared while most economic gains went to the top. If the majority of households had taken home a larger share, they wouldn’t have needed to go so deeply into debt.

Similarly, between 1913 and 1928, the ratio of personal debt to the total national economy nearly doubled. After the 1929 crash, the government invented new ways to boost wages – Social Security, unemployment insurance, overtime pay, a minimum wage, the requirement that employers bargain with labor unions, and, finally, a full-employment program called World War II.
After the 2007 crash, the government bailed out the banks and pumped enough money into the economy to contain the slide. But apart from the Affordable Care Act, nothing was done to address the underlying problem of stagnant wages.
Trump and his Republican enablers are now reversing regulations put in place to stop Wall Street’s excessively risky lending.
But Trump’s real contributions to the next crash are his sabotage of the Affordable Care Act, rollback of overtime pay, burdens on labor organizing, tax reductions for corporations and the wealthy but not for most workers, cuts in programs for the poor, and proposed cuts in Medicare and Medicaid, all of which put more stress on the paychecks of most Americans.
Ten years after the start of the Great Recession, it’s important to understand that the real root of the collapse wasn’t a banking crisis. It was the growing imbalance between consumer spending and total output, brought on by stagnant wages and widening inequality.
That imbalance is back. Watch your wallets.
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Expect a shot to hurt and it probably will, even if the needle poke isn’t really so painful. Brace for a second shot and you’ll likely flinch again, even though, second time around, you should know better..
That’s the takeaway of a new brain imaging study published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour which found that expectations about pain intensity can become self-fulfilling prophecies. Surprisingly, those false expectations can persist even when reality repeatedly demonstrates otherwise, the study found.
We discovered that there is a positive feedback loop between expectation and pain said senior author Tor Wager a professor of psychology and neuroscience at the University of Colorado Boulder.
The more pain you expect, the stronger your brain responds to the pain. The stronger your brain responds to the pain, the more you expect.

For decades, researchers have been intrigued with the idea of self-fulfilling prophecy, with studies showing expectations can influence everything from how one performs on a test to how one responds to a medication. The new study is the first to directly model the dynamics of the feedback loop between expectations and pain and the neural mechanisms underlying it.
Marieke Jepma then a postdoctoral researcher in Wager’s lab, launched the research after noticing that even when test subjects were shown time and again that something wouldn’t hurt badly, some still expected it to.
We wanted to get a better understanding of why pain expectations are so resistant to change said Jepma, lead author and now a researcher at the University of Amsterdam.
The researchers recruited 34 subjects and taught them to associate one symbol with low heat and another with high, painful heat.
Then, the subjects were placed in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) machine, which measures blood flow in the brain as a proxy for neural activity. For 60 minutes, subjects were shown low or high pain cues (the symbols, the words Low or High, or the letters L and W), then asked to rate how much pain they expected.
Then varying degrees of painful but non-damaging heat were applied to their forearm or leg, with the hottest reaching “about what it feels like to hold a hot cup of coffee” Wager explains.
Then they were asked to rate their pain.
Unbeknownst to the subjects, heat intensity was not actually related to the preceding cue.

The study found that when subjects expected more heat, brain regions involved in threat and fear were more activated as they waited. Regions involved in the generation of pain were more active when they received the stimulus. Participants reported more pain with high-pain cues, regardless of how much heat they actually got.
This suggests that expectations had a rather deep effect, influencing how the brain processes pain said Jepma.
Surprisingly, their expectations also highly influenced their ability to learn from experience. Many subjects demonstrated high confirmation bias the tendency to learn from things that reinforce our beliefs and discount those that don’t. For instance, if they expected high pain and got it, they might expect even more pain the next time. But if they expected high pain and didn’t get it, nothing changed.
You would assume that if you expected high pain and got very little you would know better the next time. But interestingly, they failed to learn said Wager.
This phenomenon could have tangible impacts on recovery from painful conditions, suggests Jepma.
Our results suggest that negative expectations about pain or treatment outcomes may in some situations interfere with optimal recovery, both by enhancing perceived pain and by preventing people from noticing that they are getting better she said. Positive expectations, on the other hand, could have the opposite effects.
The research also may shed light on why, for some, chronic pain can linger long after damaged tissues have healed.
Whether in the context of pain or mental health, the authors suggest that it may do us good to be aware of our inherent eagerness to confirm our expectations.
Just realizing that things may not be as bad as you think may help you to revise your expectation and, in doing so, alter your experience said Jepma.
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Ivanka Trump Isn’t Fooling Anyone
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He really loves that Saudi cash.

The U.S.-Saudi relationship, which dates to the 1940s, is predicated mostly on money and regional power, not shared values. But rarely, if ever, has that been stated by a president in such blunt terms.
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Aquaman Final Official Trailer!

Final trailer for the third live-action film featuring Aquaman, following Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice and Justice League. Based on characters from the comic books and graphic novels published by DC Comics. [amzn.to/2QBe6Y0]

Arthur Curry, the reluctant ruler of the underwater kingdom of Atlantis, is caught in a battle between surface dwellers that threaten his oceans and his own people, who are ready to lash out and invade the surface.

In theaters December 21, 2018. Directed by James Wan. Screenplay by David Leslie Johnson-McGoldrick and Will Beall from a story by Wan, Beall, and Geoff Johns. Stars Jason Momoa, Amber Heard, Willem Dafoe, Patrick Wilson, Dolph Lundgren, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, and Nicole Kidman.

#aquaman #arthurcurry #jasonmomoa #mera #amberheard #superheroes #action #adventure #scifi #dccomics #comics #movies
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The moon no longer has a magnetic field, but NASA scientists are publishing new research that shows heat from crystallization of the lunar core may have driven its now-defunct magnetic field some 3 billion years ago.

https://rxscience.org/nasa-confirms-the-formation-of-magnetic-field-due-to-dynamo-at-lunar-core/
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Lauren Appell: I’m thankful for Trump … and I’m not alone https://fxn.ws/2Fr9vWW #FoxNews
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Are you in recovery from stroke? We have identified the best apps to help stroke survivors with their recovery and rehabilitation.

https://thetechinside.com/the-10-best-apps-for-stroke-survivors-in-2018/
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At least they have a sense of humor about it.

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This is a really clear and important example of how corporate interests influence legislation to undermine the public's well-being.
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Trump rejected calls by many in Congress, including members of his own party, for a tougher response, and he dismissed reports from U.S. intelligence agencies that Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman must have at least known about such an intricate plot to kill Jamal Khashoggi.
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Size matters: If you are a bubble of volcanic gas | #Geology #GeologyPage

The chemical composition of gases emitted from volcanoes — which are used to monitor changes in volcanic activity — can change depending on the size of gas bubbles rising to the surface, and relate to the way in which they erupt.

Read more : http://www.geologypage.com/2018/08/size-matters-if-you-are-a-bubble-of-volcanic-gas.html
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