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Apple to create 4000 jobs in India for development of Maps app and other products in the Hyderabad facility- Technology News, Firstpost
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2018 NFL Draft: Baker Mayfield may have a preferred destination: Baker Mayfield dropped a not-so-subtle hint on Instagram for what team he wants to play for in the NFL. http://dlvr.it/QBqpXv
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Instagram's Direct Messaging comes with a 'last active' feature; but you can hide it as well
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From 1966 to now:
See all the championship rings ahead of the Super Bowl three Sundays away. http://nbcbay.com/eoaLdF7
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WhatsApp Business is finally out; brings Business profiles, messaging tools, statistics and more- Technology News, Firstpost
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There are a few voices in the present government willing to call out Trump on his unchecked lying, instability, incoherence and arrogance.
When those voices are from within Trump's own party, there can be no claim of bias.

The fact is that the only republicans who are willing to speak out are the ones who admit to themselves that their financial backers will abandon them for speaking the truth.

The additional fact that these few voices of truth feel they cannot get reelected due to the loss of financial support they will incur speaking such truths, merely evidences the failures of the system which gives corporates such leverage over candidates.

(The article contains a link to the full speech transcript -- there's more!)

From the article linked below:

[Jeff] Flake's speech Wednesday -- regardless of his motives -- was a powerful rejection of the "fake news/"alternative facts" era that Trump's candidacy -- and presidency -- has ushered in......
I read through it and plucked out 20 of the most damning lines directed at Trump.

1. "For without truth, and a principled fidelity to truth and to shared facts, Mr. President, our democracy will not last."
Flake, right from the start of the speech, is talking about BIG stuff -- like the future of democracy. And, he's right: Without an agreed-upon set of truths -- and a group of people trusted to fairly judge whether people adhere to those truths or not -- democracy starts to fall apart.

2. "2017 was a year which saw the truth -- objective, empirical, evidence-based truth -- more battered and abused than any other in the history of our country, at the hands of the most powerful figure in our government."
As of last week, President Trump had said more than 2,000 things that were either totally false or misleading, according to a count kept by the Washington Post. That's more than 5.5 factually inaccurate or incorrect statements a day. Every day.

3. "It was the year in which an unrelenting daily assault on the constitutionally-protected free press was launched by that same White House, an assault that is as unprecedented as it is unwarranted."
It's important to harp on this point from Flake. All White Houses -- and all politicians -- don't love the way the media covers them. They want the coverage to focus much more on what they've done as opposed to what they've failed to do. But, what Trump has done is well beyond that sort of territory. He has embarked on a comprehensive and purposeful attempt to vilify and discredit the media for his own political purposes.

4. "It is a testament to the condition of our democracy that our own president uses words infamously spoken by Josef Stalin to describe his enemies."
This is the line that has drawn the most attention -- and controversy -- from Flake's speech. "Sen. Flake, turn on the news," tweeted Republican National Committee Chair Ronna Romney McDaniel. "It's wall-to-wall with biased coverage against @POTUS. He has every right to push back. Comparing the leader of the free world to murderous dictators is absurd. You've gone too far."

5. "The president has it precisely backward -- despotism is the enemy of the people. The free press is the despot's enemy, which makes the free press the guardian of democracy."
This is a Republican senator -- albeit one who is retiring -- basically calling the Republican President of the United States a "despot." Stunning. Even in an age in which that word has lost almost all meaning.

6. "When a figure in power reflexively calls any press that doesn't suit him "fake news," it is that person who should be the figure of suspicion, not the press."
CORRECT. And, an important point: Trump uses the phrase "fake news" to describe stories he doesn't like. That, of course, doesn't make them fake.

7. "Mr. President, so powerful is the presidency that the damage done by the sustained attack on the truth will not be confined to the President's time in office."
If Trump's presidency ended today, there is NO doubt that his lasting legacy on the office, our politics and our country would be his disdain for facts and his attempts to vilify the media for trying to do its job. The idea -- forwarded by Trump -- that objective truth simply doesn't exist and everything is a matter of opinion and perspective is hugely corrosive for democracy.

8. "Here in America, we do not pay obeisance to the powerful -- in fact, we question the powerful most ardently"
One of my favorite quotes about journalism comes via Finley Peter Dunne: "The job of the newspaper is to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable."

9. "No matter how powerful, no president will ever have dominion over objective reality."
Trump is putting this argument to the test. He may not have dominion over objective reality but he is working very hard to make the case that objective reality doesn't even really exist.

10. "A major difference between politicians and the free press is that the press usually corrects itself when it gets something wrong. Politicians don't."
This is especially true with Trump. While the media has made errors in the Trump era, those mistakes have been addressed and there have been consequences for them. Trump has said more than 2,000 things that are misleading or false and hasn't once apologized for doing so or stopped saying the thing that isn't true.

11. "No longer can we compound attacks on truth with our silent acquiescence. No longer can we turn a blind eye or a deaf ear to these assaults on our institutions."
While much of Flake's speech is meant for Trump, this line is clearly targeted at Flake's Senate colleagues -- many of whom throw up their hands and say nothing every time Trump lies or commits some new outrage. That reaction isn't enough in the face of such an existential threat, according to Flake.

12. "An American president who cannot take criticism -- who must constantly deflect and distort and distract -- who must find someone else to blame -- is charting a very dangerous path."
Trump's thin-skinnedness is somewhat remarkable given that he has spent almost his entire adult life in the public eye.

13. "2018 must be the year in which the truth takes a stand against power that would weaken it."
Flake is actively calling for a revolt against Trump by his own party -- in an election year no less!

14. "Together, united in the purpose to do our jobs under the Constitution, without regard to party or party loyalty, let us resolve to be allies of the truth -- and not partners in its destruction."
I am going to make a prediction here: The Senate won't be throwing aside party loyalty any time soon.

15. "To be very clear, to call the Russia matter a 'hoax' -- as the President has many times -- is a falsehood."
Already in 2018, Trump has sent out three separate tweets deriding the Russia investigation as a "hoax."

16. "Every word that a president utters projects American values around the world."
This is both a) objectively true and b) something that Trump appears to either not grasp or not care to grasp.

17. "Between the mighty and the modest, truth is the great leveler."
My favorite line of the speech -- by far.

18. "Not only has the past year seen an American president borrow despotic language to refer to the free press, but it seems he has in turn inspired dictators and authoritarians with his own language."
We tend to focus on the impact Trump's words have on American society and our politics. But, as Flake catalogs in his speech, it's quite clear that Trump's norm-busting is being watched by authoritarians the world over as they seek to diminish the idea of objective truth and put their own political goals into the vacuum created.

19. "In our own country, from the trivial to the truly dangerous, it is the range and regularity of the untruths we see that should be cause for profound alarm, and spur to action."
This is spot-on. What has amazed me in the first year of Trump's presidency is not his willingness to fib about big things but the little white lies he tells about stuff that's laughably easy to check -- and in so doing prove him wrong.

20. "If we compromise the truth for the sake of our politics, we are lost."
Partisanship and politics has become not only the over-arching concern for lots of politicians but the only concern. The reaction by the White House to Trump's "shithole" comments -- this will play well with our base! -- was the epitome of this politics-over-everything view.

LINK:

http://edition.cnn.com/2018/01/17/politics/jeff-flake-trump-press-speech-analysis/index.html
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"Can tumors teach us about animal evolution on Earth? Researchers believe so and now present a novel hypothesis of why animal diversity increased dramatically on Earth about half a billion years ago. A biological innovation may have been key.

Life on Earth was dominated by microbes for roughly 4 billion years when multicellular life suddenly - then in the form of animals in robust ecosystems - made a vigorous entry. Why animals diversified so late and so dramatically has remained unresolved and is a matter of hot debate.

The diversification of animals occurred over a geologically short period of time and is known as the Cambrian explosion. Many geologists have assumed that the Cambrian explosion was triggered by an increase of atmospheric oxygen.

However, a causal relationship between the Cambrian explosion and increasing atmospheric oxygen lacks convincing evidence.

Indeed, research over the last years weaken the support for a correlation between the Cambrian explosion and increasing atmospheric oxygen. For example, dramatic changes in atmospheric oxygen are noted both before and after the Cambrian, but not specifically when animal diversification took off.

Simple animals are furthermore noted to require surprisingly low oxygen levels, which would have been met well before the Cambrian.

"A heated hunt for the geochemical evidence that oxygen increased when animals diversified goes on but, after decades of discussion, it seems worthwhile to consider the development of multicellularity also from other angles", says geobiologist Emma Hammarlund, PhD and researcher at the division for translational cancer research at Lund University and guest researcher at the Nordic Center for Earth Evolution at the University of Southern Denmark.

In order to understand more about the conditions for multicellular life, Emma Hammarlund contacted tumor biologist, Professor Sven Påhlman at the Department of Laboratory Medicine at Lund University, who has explored the importance of low oxygen concentrations, or so-called hypoxia, in the tumor setting for nearly two decades.

"I wanted to learn what tumor scientists observe on a daily basis, in terms of tissue growth and how it relates to oxygen. Tumours are after all, and unfortunately, successful versions of multicellularity", explains Emma Hammarlund".

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The new Exynos 7885 SoC is arguably the Galaxy A8 (2018)’s best feature

A lot has been said about the new Galaxy A8 (2018) and Galaxy A8+ (2018), especially when it comes to how these handsets bring Samsung’s mid-range lineup closer to the flagships more than ever. What hasn’t been highlighted enough is the Exynos chip that powers these handsets. The Exynos 7885 is the first Exynos 7 series chip to sport performance-oriented Cortex-A73 cores (and also the first with Bluetooth 5.0 support), and in my experience with the A8+, I’ve come to realize that the new Exynos SoC makes for one of the most significant upgrades to the A series.

It’s what’s under the hood that counts

I’ve talked about how the Galaxy A7 (2017) disappointed me with its everyday performance, and I’d chalk it up to the fact that it was powered by a processor that’s all about efficiency (even though a Snapdragon chip with similar specs seems to perform better). The Exynos 7880 that powered the 2017 models of the A5 and A7 was an octa-core chip with eight Cortex-A53 cores, and it just didn’t have the grunt to keep Samsung’s heavy (and still fairly unoptimized) software running without hiccups. My girlfriend is currently using the A7 (2017), and while her complaints of poor performance have only become more frequent in the last couple of months, that phone wasn’t a great performer out of the box, either.

It’s a different story with the Galaxy A8+, however. Performance on this phone has been almost flagship-like in everyday usage, with the few stutters and hiccups here and there not getting in the way of the user experience. It’s not perfect: The A8+ slows down when apps are being installed or updated in the background, or when I try to switch between two apps quickly by double tapping the recent apps button. But, like the Infinity display or the Gear VR support, the A8+’ everyday performance makes it feel like a flagship without all the bells and whistles (or price tag) of an actual flagship. The 6GB of RAM helps, of course, but our experience with the A8 has been a similar one despite lower RAM on that model.

Now, as with most Samsung phones, it’s possible the A8 and A8+ will slow down after a few weeks or months of use, but things are looking promising right now. If anything, just the fact that there are two Cortex-A73 cores under the hood means the A8 or A8+ will not see the same kind of performance dip as their predecessors. Again, nothing’s certain until someone has used one of these phones for an extended period, but as it stands right now, I would argue that the new Exynos 7885 chipset is the Galaxy A8 and A8+’ best feature.

#exynos #exynos7885 #Android #AndroidOreo #A8 #A8+ #A82018 #GalaxyA8 #GalaxyA8+ #Cortex #IndieDev #Promote #CES2018 #MWC2018
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Ex-Giants running back allegedly attacked, threatened to kill wife http://nyp.st/2BeLLxL
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The watchdog believes Apple and Samsung purposely slow down their smartphones with software updates in an effort to push people toward newer smartphones. #News #Apple #Italy
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"Scholars from Rice University, University College London and the Field Museum have found the first direct evidence that glass was produced in sub-Saharan Africa centuries before the arrival of Europeans, a finding that the researchers said represents a "new chapter in the history of glass technology."

The discovery is discussed in "Chemical Analysis of Glass Beads from Igbo Olokun, Ile-Ife (SW Nigeria): New Light on Raw Materials, Production and Interregional Interactions," which will appear in an upcoming volume of the Journal of Archaeological Science.

Lead author Abidemi Babatunde Babalola, a recent graduate of Rice with a Ph.D. in anthropology and a visiting fellow at Harvard University, came across evidence of early glassmaking during archaeological excavations at Igbo Olokun, located on the northern periphery of Ile-Ife in southwestern Nigeria. He recovered more than 12,000 glass beads and several kilograms of glass-working debris.

"This area has been recognized as a glass-working workshop for more than a century," Babalola said. "The glass-encrusted containers and beads that have been uncovered there were viewed for many years as evidence that imported glass was remelted and reworked."

However, 10 years ago this idea was challenged when analyses of glass beads attributed to Ile-Ife showed that some had a chemical composition very different from that of known glass production areas. Researchers raised the possibility of local production in Ife, although direct evidence for glassmaking and its chronology was lacking.

"The Igbo Olokun excavations have provided that evidence," Babalola said.

The researchers' analysis of 52 glass beads from the excavated assemblage revealed that none matched the chemical composition of any other known glass-production area in the Old World, including Egypt, the eastern Mediterranean, the Middle East and Asia. Rather, the beads have a high-lime, high-alumina (HLHA) composition that reflects local geology and raw materials, the researchers said. The excavations provided evidence that glass production at Igbo Olokun dates to the 11th through 15th centuries A.D., well before the arrival of Europeans along the coast of West Africa".

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#Gameable

New continent anyone?
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