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All about the Aditya-L1: ISRO's upcoming satellite to unveil secrets of the Sun- Technology News, Firstpost

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Happy 25th Birthday to Debian!

Ian Murdock announced Debian on 1993Aug16 with the first release the
following month.

Thanks to all the #Debian volunteers that have worked to make a fantastic
Free Software distribution, project and community!

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In a massive region of space, astronomers find far fewer galaxies than they expected
(3 UCLA scientists contribute to study that could change perception of how early universe evolved)

University of California astronomers, including three from UCLA, have resolved a mystery about the early universe and its first galaxies.

Astronomers have known that more than 12 billion years ago, about 1 billion years after the Big Bang, the gas in deep space was, on average, much more opaque than it is now in some regions, although the opacity varied widely from place to place. But they weren’t sure about what caused those variations.

To learn why the differences occurred, the astronomers used one of the world’s largest telescopes, the Subaru telescope on Mauna Kea in Hawaii, to search for galaxies of young stars in an exceptionally large region of space — 500 million light-years across — where they knew the intergalactic gas was extremely opaque.

If the region had an unusually small number of galaxies, the scientists would be able to conclude that starlight could not penetrate as far as expected through the intergalactic gas; if it had an unusually large number of galaxies, the implication would be that the region had cooled significantly over the previous several hundred million years. (Having few galaxies in a region would mean not only that there was less light created by those galaxies, but also that even more opaque gas was being formed, so the light could not travel as far as astronomers had expected.)

“It was a rare case in astronomy where two competing models, both of which were compelling in their own way, offered precisely opposite predictions, and we were lucky that those predictions were testable,” said Steven Furlanetto, a UCLA professor of astronomy and a co-author of the research.

The researchers found that region contains far fewer galaxies than expected — clear evidence that starlight could not get through. The paucity of galaxies could be the reason this region is so opaque.

“It is not that the opacity is a cause of the lack of galaxies,” Furlanetto said. “Instead, it’s the other way around.”

They concluded that because the gas in deep space is kept transparent by ultraviolet light from galaxies, fewer nearby galaxies might make it murkier.

Read more at>>
http://newsroom.ucla.edu/releases/astronomers-find-far-fewer-galaxies-than-they-expected

#astronomy #astrophysics #physics

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Samsung Galaxy Note 9 top covers and cases #GalaxyNote9 #Samsung #SamsungNews

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How to Install #Lubuntu 18.04 Dual Boot with Windows 10 https://linoxide.com/distros/install-lubuntu-dual-boot-windows/

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Google One is now open to all

A few months ago, Google announced Google One, its new subscription program for getting more Google Drive storage and other perks. Over the course of the last few weeks, Google slowly rolled existing Drive subscribers over to a Google One membership and starting today, new users (at least in the U.S., with other countries coming soon) can now sign up for a One subscription, too

Google One plans start at 100 GB for $1.99. There’s also a 200 GB tier for $2.99 and a 2 TB option for $9.99. If you need even more storage space, Google will happily sell you 10 TB, 20 TB and 30 TB plans for between $99.99 and $299.99 per month.

One nice feature of these new plans is that you can share your storage allotment with up to five family members.

#GoogleOne #GoogleDrive

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New studies explain what causes migraines in females more than males. For one thing, women have lower levels of a proton exchanger that regulates pain signals.
Read More:

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Samsung patents for Self-Healing oleophobic display coating #samsung #SamsungNews

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Pretty postcards. "What's new out at Jupiter? We haven't looked in on NASA’s Juno spacecraft since (checks blog archive) May. Juno completed its 14th close flyby of Jupiter on July 15, and as of Tuesday morning, it was 8 million kilometers from Jupiter, gradually working its way back toward the planet following apojove.

In general Jupiter news, astronomers have found 12 new Jovian moons, while one of Juno's instruments saw what may be a new volcano on Io!

And, of course, there are some recent pretty pictures from JunoCam, brought to you by image processors from around the world."

Image: Jupiter as seen on perijove 14. NASA / SwRI / MSSS / Brian Swift / Seán Doran

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Photo

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Why the Royals Are 'Less Concerned' About Meghan Markle’s Half-Sister Talking to the Press Than Her Dad http://ellemag.co/Ddmn4Un

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Your blood type could raise or lower your risk for certain diseases. Learn how type A, B, AB, or O could impact your long term health.

http://health-zone.org/5-things-blood-type-says-health/

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China announced on Wednesday that its Chang’e-4 lunar lander and rover is expected to land on the far side of the moon later this year.

Images displayed at a press conference in Beijing showed that the rover is a rectangular box with two folding solar panels and six wheels. It is 1.5 metres long, a metre wide and 1.1 metres high.

#space #china #technology #moon #lunar #spaceexploration #science

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Google confirmed these features are now available as of today.

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Google’s most sought after broad core algorithm update #Google August 1 Core Update is now fully rolled out.

#GoogleUpdate #GoogleAlgorithmUpdate #GoogleNews #SEO

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Amazing Timelapse video of clouds in the sky...

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Thanks to the wind, heat is distributed around the planet. Equatorial regions receive more heat from the Sun than other parts of the world. This leads to differences in air temperature, density and pressure, which in turn, cause the air to move – creating wind.

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Virtuoso reveals the Hot 10 countries experiencing the most growth in fall and winter bookings.
See All:

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Trump Signs Defense Bill, Says He’ll Ignore Many Limits Set by Congress https://nym.ag/2PbgZy5

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Math shows how human behavior spreads infectious diseases - Mathematics can help public health workers better understand and influence human behaviors that lead to the spread of infectious disease, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.
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