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Video: Check out some rare pictures of retired MMA superstar Ronda Rousey.

https://mmaprophet.com/2018/04/11/ronda-rousey-rare-photos/

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A growing body of research is starting to convince many doctors to think again how they look at #fats and #heartdisease, according to Healthy Ways Newsletter. #coconutoil #LDLCholesterol #HDL Cholesterol

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Even with only the 1st issue of the actual event series out, Marvel's Infinity Wars and its related tie-ins already have all the makings of something memorable

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Just as important, but less often discussed, are the foods and beverages that take away from bone health. Beware of these foods that are bad for your bones.

http://www.healthyvogue.com/9-foods-bad-for-bones/

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VIDEO: Bump Sweep from Side Control by the MMA Candy Girls

https://mmaprophet.com/2017/11/27/bump-sweep-side-control-mma-candy-girls/

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Dental erosion is one of the most common tooth problems in the world today. Fizzy drinks, fruit juice, wine, and other acidic food and drink are usually to blame, although perhaps surprisingly the way we clean our teeth also plays a role.

This all makes it sound like a rather modern issue. But research suggests actually humans have been suffering dental erosion for millions of years. My colleagues and I have discovered dental lesions remarkably similar to those caused by modern erosion on two 2.5m year-old front teeth from one of our extinct ancestors. This adds to the evidence that prehistoric humans and their predecessors suffered surprisingly similar dental problems to ourselves, despite our very different diets.

Dental erosion can affect all dental tissue and typically leaves shallow, shiny, lesions in the enamel and root surface. If you brush your teeth too vigorously you can weaken dental tissue, which over time allows acidic foods and drinks to create deep holes known as non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs).

We found such lesions on the fossilised teeth from a human ancestor species Australopithecus africanus. Given the lesions' size and position, this individual would likely have had toothache or sensitivity.

So why did this prehistoric hominin have tooth problems that look indistinguishable from that caused by drinking large volumes of fizzy drinks today? The answer may come back to another unlikely parallel. Erosive wear today is often also associated with aggressive tooth brushing. Australopithecus africanus probably experienced similar dental abrasion from eating tough and fibrous foods.

For lesions to form, they would still have needed a diet high in acidic foods. Instead of fizzy drinks, this probably came in the form of citrus fruits and acidic vegetables.

For example, tubers (potatoes and the like) are tough to eat and some can be surprisingly acidic, so they could have been a cause of the lesions.

Dental erosion is extremely rare in the fossil record, although this might be because researchers haven't thought to look for evidence of it until now. But another type of problem, carious lesions or cavities, has been found more often in fossilised teeth. Cavities are the most common cause of toothache today and are caused by consuming starchy or sugary food and drink including grains.

They are often considered a relatively modern problem linked to the fact that the invention of farming introduced large amounts of carbohydrates, and more recently refined sugar, to our diets.

But recent research suggests this is not the case. In fact, cavities have now been found in tooth fossils from nearly every prehistoric hominin species studied. They were probably caused by eating certain fruits and vegetation as well as honey. These lesions were often severe, as in the case of cavities found on the teeth of the newly discovered species, Homo naledi. In fact, these cavities were so deep they probably took years to form and would almost certainly have caused serious toothache.

🌟Dental Abrasion🌟

Another striking type of dental wear is also more common in the fossil record, and again we can guess how and why it was created by looking at the teeth of people alive today. This process, called dental abrasion, is caused by repeatedly rubbing or holding a hard item against a tooth. It could come from biting your nails, smoking a pipe or holding a sewing needle between your teeth.

These activities usually take years to form noticeable notches and grooves, so when we find such holes in fossilised teeth they offer fascinating insights into behaviour and culture. The best examples of this type of prehistoric dental wear are "toothpick grooves", thought to be caused by repeatedly placing an object in the mouth, usually in the gaps between the back teeth.

The presence of microscopic scratches around these grooves suggests they are examples of prehistoric dental hygiene, where the individual has used stick or other implements used to dislodge food. Some of these grooves are found on the same teeth as cavities and other dental problems, suggesting they may also be evidence of people trying to relieve their toothache.

These lesions have been found in a variety of hominin species, including prehistoric humans and Neanderthals, but only in the species most closely related to us, not our older ancestors.
This might mean this tooth wear is the result of more complex behaviour from species with larger brains. But more likely it's a consequence of different diets and cultural habits.

What we do know for sure is that the complex and severe dental problems we often associate with a modern diet of processed foods and refined sugars actually existed far back into our ancestry, although less frequently.

Further research will likely show that lesions were more common than previously thought in our ancestors, and ultimately will provide more information into the diet and cultural practices of our distant fossil relatives.


Written by: Ian Towle, Sessional Lecturer in Anthropology, Liverpool John Moores University.

This article was originally published on The Conversation.

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In July, YouGov found 42% of the public were in favour of a new vote, compared with 40% who were opposed. In April 2017 just 31% of people had supported a second referendum. Further polling for the People’s Vote campaign found support was strengthened by the prospect of no deal. In a YouGov poll of more than 10,000 people, 50% said that in the event of no-deal outcome in negotiations there should be a fresh vote.

The only conceivable route to a second referendum before the #Brexit deadline in March would be if #TheresaMay is unable to pass through the Commons any version of an exit deal that she manages to agree with Brussels. If there is no parliamentary route to break the deadlock, there could be a referendum or a general election, though both remain unlikely.


#WorldEconomy #EuropeanEconomy #UKEconomy #EconomicOutlook #Economy #EconomicRisks #BrexitRisks #Politics #Geopolitics #HardBrexit #NoDealBrexit #UK #EU
Is public support shifting toward a second EU referendum?
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/aug/19/public-support-shifting-toward-second-brexit-referendum-explainer

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#19Aug 2018, WWE #Summerslam: #RondaRousey now carries the torch for the WWE Women's Division

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#19Aug 2018, WWE #Summerslam: Behind the scenes of #RondaRousey's #RAW Women's Title photo shoot

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Apps are available for everything these days — from shopping to entertainment and travel. Apps that claim to help look after your mental health and well-being are also available. So, we have selected the best apps for mental health.

https://todaysintech.com/top-10-mental-health-apps/

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Who would have thaught...

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Now You Can 3D-Print a NASA SOFIA Flying Telescope of Your Very Own!
https://www.space.com/41456-3d-print-sofia-flying-telescope.html

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In this slideshow, you’ll learn the good, the bad, and the ugly about your body -- including some fascinating facts you’ll wish you never knew.

http://www.thehealthypage.com/11-fascinating-facts-about-your-body/

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The escalating #tradewar with #China is leading #US retailers to speed up the import of goods from Asia's largest economy to avoid new tariffs and ensure they have adequate supplies for the winter holidays. Executives say nervous importers pushed forward shipments into the Port of Los Angeles that would normally arrive later in the year into July due to uncertainty surrounding the U.S.-China trade fight and looming tariffs proposed on a variety of imported consumer products. As a result, the surge in goods coming in has exacerbated the already tight availability of warehouse space close to the LA/Long Beach port complex.


#WorldEconomy #Protectionism #America #Globalisation #GlobalTrade #TradeWars #EconomicRisk #Economy #TradePolicy #InternationalTrade #TradeTariffs #Politics #Geopolitics #InternationalRelations #USA #GlobalTradeWar #AmericanEconomy
Trump trade war with China leads to 'off the charts' rush of imports at nation's busiest port and more demand for warehouse space
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/08/15/trump-trade-war-with-china-spurs-off-the-charts-rush-at-port-of-la.html

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Cardi B Planning A ‘Spectacular And Memorable’ Performance For The VMAs - Source Says She Is 'Nervous'
http://celebrityinsider.org/cardi-b-planning-a-spectacular-and-memorable-performance-for-the-vmas-source-says-she-is-nervous-181766/
#celebritynews #CardiB, #MtvVideoMusicAwards celebrityinsider.org #Music #celebrities #celebrity #celebrityinsider

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Samsung will release its first 5G phone in early 2019, but it will not be the Galaxy S10
#Samsung #GalaxyS10 #Samsung

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Samsung Galaxy Note 9 with an all new S Pen: Top 5 features you must know #Samsung #GalaxyNote9 #news #tips

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Aspose is proud to expand its #APIs family with the addition of a new product known Aspose.Cells for #PHP via #Java. The new #API incorporates #MSExcel data processing and rendering functionalities in PHP same like Aspose.Cells for Java. It is equally robust and feature rich #component. It supports high-fidelity #file #format #conversions to and from #XLS, #XLSX, #XLSM, #SpreadsheetML, #CSV, Tab Delimited, #HTML, #MHTML and #OpenDocument Spreadsheet in PHP. It also supports #rendering spreadsheet to #PDF, #EMF, #GIF, #PNG, #JPEG formats. The #developers will have full programmatic access through a rich APIs set to all MS Excel document objects and formatting that allows to create, modify, extract, #copy, #merge and #replace #spreadsheet content. Read complete release notes here: https://goo.gl/1rgtt2
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