Howdy folks!  Feel free to keep diving into this community or using it any creative learning way you imagine!  I had an unexpected software project come up at work which affected my participation, but I'm going to continue to explore the activities from prior weeks.  Feel free to stay in touch!  Thanks to each of you.

Hey everyone, is the group still active ?

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Happening in 11 hours !
This Webinar is part of the Open Education Week ( openeducationweek.org )

CrispyScience is announcing its initiative to develop educational computer interacting toys using MakeyMakey and Scratch. It will show case its first prototype design of an interactive game that demonstrates the Mendelian inheritance principles . The design and software will both be shared under the creative commons licence to the public. The end of webinar will have a brief  demonstration of how hardware and software design could be developed and shared by educators with NO programing background. MakeyMakey and Scratch are an open hardware and software combination of platforms that both started at MIT and made innovational and computational thinking accesable to kids all around the globe.



About:
Scratch is developed by the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab, with financial support from the National Science Foundation, Microsoft, Intel Foundation, MacArthur Foundation, Google, Iomega and MIT Media Lab research consortia.
http://info.scratch.mit.edu/About_Scratch

MakeyMakey project is based on Reearch at MIT Media Lab's Lifelong Kindergarten.Created by Jay silver, Eric Rosenbaum, JoyLabz.
 makeymakey.com/about.php

Crispy Science is a Saudi Arabian startup focused on informal learning and free choice learning. It aims to exciting curiosity by enriching science and technology awareness and promotion through the design and implementation of science communication products, programs and platforms.
http://crispyscience.com/English/about-us/

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I'm also a little behind, a little over burdened, besides working full time, I'm also in College full-time.  I just felt like this was too big an opportunity to pass up

Howdy - Checking in with everyone - I have a busy couple of week on my plate at work, so I'm behind, but I haven't dropped out.  How are you all doing, and where are you at with the course?

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My marshmallow challenge.  Measured about 10 1/2 inches high.  Collapsed instantly after I took the photo.  This was an interesting activity, indeed. Has anyone else given it a shot yet?  :-)
Photo

"Gears of my childhood" writing activity
Cooking and baking bread. 
 
As a young child, I had a science inspired child’s cookbook, and was allowed to cook.  My Mom and my best friend’s Mom, Joyce, were really into baking bread.  Mom and Joyce would let me help as they baked.  Combined, our households produced about 8 loaves per week.

I learned you had to treat the yeast carefully, that it is a living organism.  With the proper care and technique, the yeast would start eating sugars and cause the bread to rise, by-products of the yeast activating made delicious bread.  I learned if I left out an ingredient, or measured incorrectly, it would be a flop or taste awful.  The ingredients were simple, and created something a bit magical when given just the right touch.

Joyce got deeper into the details of the ingredients, and even began grinding her own flour.  We were in an urban area, so I was fascinated to see the grains become flour, and to notice how that affected the taste and quality of the loaf.  No one else I knew was grinding their own flour.  In fact, most people would just buy bread at the supermarket.  Joyce got a convection oven, which used air currents to bake the bread faster.  I asked lots of questions and was allowed to help at every step along the way.  Smelling the bread bake was delightful.  Even more wonderful was eating bread right out of the oven, slathered with butter.  Ahhhh.

It took many hours to bake a loaf of bread.  My Mom would come home from a long day at the office and start mixing, kneading, and letting the bread rise, punching it down and letting it rise again.  To me, it seemed labor-intensive.  Wouldn’t she rather sit with her feet up?  She found kneading the dough relaxing.  I found that surprising, but watching her braid dough into long loaves, it was clear how happy it made her.  As an adult, I still enjoy baking, but I’m not quite as passionate about it as my Mom and Joyce.

Just a note, the Syllabus for this course is on the medialab page

http://learn.media.mit.edu/syllabus.html

Here we can find link to first session plus reading material.

Also we can find future updates here as well.

l have created a google doc in order to keep track of the members of the group. If anyone cannot access it send me an email and I will add to the group.

Another program which is worth looking into is the one Robert Best mentioned

http://meetingwords.com

I have created a meetingwords pad and the following is the link that will lead you to it

http://meetingwords.com/Dqj3QNi7K6

I took the liberty of setting these things up if anyone has other ideas please share.

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