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Interesting Litigation: DON’T LIKE THE FAA’S DRONE REGISTRATION? SUE THEM! http://ow.ly/xnM6304zM1u Lawsuit in the DC District Court, claiming that the FAA has overstepped their mandate. The lawsuit will hinge (as legal battles often do) on the interpretation of words. The FAA’s interpretation of quadcopters to be “aircraft” rather than toys is at the center of the dispute. Putting hobbyists into a catch-22, the FAA also requires recreational RC pilots to stay under a height of 400 feet, while requiring “aircraft” to stay above 500 feet except for emergencies, take-off, or landing. Which do they mean? #DroneLawsuit

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Is This Really Fair???? Top airlines have made over $2 billion in baggage fees this year http://ow.ly/7kwz304sPLQ Overall airlines racked up $4.6 billion in ancillary fees (which include items like reservation fees), up from $3.1 billion in the first quarter of 2016 but down from $5.5 billion in the second quarter of 2015. Airlines made $755 million from reservation change fees alone. #AirlineFees

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NTSB Urges New Safety Rules for Jets on Slippery Runways http://ow.ly/u3tU304fuDC Recommendation stems from sliding incident involving Delta plane at LaGuardia Airport. Runway excursions, as they are called, have been the first- or second-most frequent category of commercial-aviation accidents globally for well over 15 years, prompting the two plane makers to use different tactics to try to combat the hazards. If such systems turn out to be “technically and operationally feasible,” according to the NTSB, the FAA should work with manufacturers to ensure they are installed and the resulting data is received and can be “easily interpreted” by pilots, airport operators and air-traffic controllers. The safety board years ago issued a similar call, and now classifies the response as “unacceptable” because FAA didn’t adopt its recommendations. But a summary of the report also notes “these systems are still under development and evaluation.”

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FRIDAY MORNING: Phone Battery Catches Fire Aboard Delta Flight http://ow.ly/c0ER304isdn The battery was not attached to a phone. Flight attendants, as well as some quick-thinking passengers, attempted to douse the fire with bottled water while asking passengers in the affected area to move to the front of the plane. The attendants said the battery that caught fire was not attached to a phone and it was not clear who owned it. There have been a handful of instances of phones catching fire on aircrafts, and the Federal Aviation Administration has warned passengers not to charge or use Samsung Galaxy Note 7 phones while on airplanes. #GalaxyPhoneFire

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Hi everyone! My Name is Miguel Ruiz Garcia, I am studying a MSc in Safety and Human Factors in Aviation in Cranfield University. I am looking for volunteers to participate in the study I am conducting about the passenger’s perception towards airline safety. If you have ever flown on a plane your experience and opinions will be appreciated. The questionnaire is finished and ready for participants to take it. This is the link to it https://cranfielduniversity.eu.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_9MpU2jh3vkGbS2p.
Please feel free to take a look at it and if you find it satisfactory, share it with whoever you feel adequate.
If you have any questions please contact me.
Thank You!!

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