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Isn't it neat? That's the Computer Architecture Bookshelf right behind my home office desk. There is some not that computer architecture related stuff at the lower right, though.
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Stumbled upon yesterday at archive.org: A Fortran Coloring Book by Roger Emanuel Kaufman, MIT Press, 1978. The URL loads a PDF version of this book.

MIT Press BTW recently submitted quite a bunch of text books to archive.org.

https://ia801506.us.archive.org/33/items/9780262610261/9780262610261.pdf

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Here's a selected 17 pages of DELETE the book about products which never made it. More than a coffee table book, but lots of good pictures anyway. See IBM's take on the Atari 800!
All the computers never made - a survey of "vapourware", or rather, products conceived, maybe prototyped, maybe even manufactured, but cancelled anyway. Several from IBM's efforts in the 70s to understand personal computing (Aquarius, SCAMP, Yellow Bird), several from Sinclair struggling to define desirable low cost products, also some deeper history: Saab's transistor machine, a relay machine, a differential analyser... all the way back to Babbage.
17 photos here, the book 200+ pages. Much more than a coffee table book - lots of detail of the context of each machine. More product design than computer engineering though.
A recommendation from +Norbert Landsteiner - thanks!

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I didn't know until recently, that there is also a German translation of Hennessy/Patterson Computer Architecture — A Quantitative Approach. It's the translation of their first edition (1990), I couldn't find a more recent translation.

Looks like I start a "subcollection" on several editions of books by Hennessy/Patterson. It's neither my first book by them nor the first German translation of books by them 😃
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Caxton Foster's book Computer Architecture - a teaching text, with some history background and several architectures developed through the book. This is the expanded second edition from 1977 - it would be interesting to see the earlier work. This one covers technologies such as bubble memory and plated wire memory. It introduces a series of simple architectures for teaching purposes: BLUE, INDIGO. But also covers some commercial machines and microprocessors: the 8080, the 2650, the 4-bit AMI 9209, the PPUs of the 6600, the Honeywell 8200 - and then off into a chapter on parallel machines.
I find a bit patchy but there's heaps of content.

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I was pleasantly surprised by this - not dumbed down at all. From 1981, when the choices ran to ZX81 and VIC-20 and many S100 machines. The PET, TRS-80 and even Apple III get a quick mention, as do the TI 99/4 and Acorn's Atom, but there's no dwelling on brand specifics. Why might you want a computer? For your small business or to learn about computers, most likely.
"Everything you want to know about Personal Computers" by Peter Rodwell actually kicks off with a quick history chapter from Babbage's Difference Engine to Colossus to chips. Then a quick bit on binary, on memory, on storage - meaning floppy disks. He mentions assembly language, even, but in passing - this is more an orientation guide for someone who hasn't yet bought a micro.
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5/8/17
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The only necessary for real coders:
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This is a surprisingly slim book on the subject of computer architecture. On just 170+ pages, it has chapters on CPU instruction sets, information coding, memory addressing, data transfer and I/O, interrupts, and computer arithmetic. The appendix describes the Data General NOVA, a DEC PDP-11 and the Motorola 6800 CPU each in regards of the book chapters. The book was published 1979 by Prentice-Hall.
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Probably not the best but certainly a very important book about programming on Unix systems. Its often named in a row with Software Tools by Kernighan/Plauger and The C Programming Language by Kernighan/Ritchie.

Being way too young for participating the rise of Unix (born mid 1970), I got this copy very recently from an eBay seller. #vintagecomputing
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