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When the city revamped its zoning regulations for the first time in four decades, it made inclusionary zoning part of the deal.

Now, this is paying off.

http://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/news/housing-complex/blog/20972914/dc-affordable-housing-program-begins-seeing-results

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The process for setting school construction budgets guaranteed wildly unrealistic projections. There are several reasons:

First, construction contracts were approved before designs were complete.
Second, the Department of General Services, or DGS, relied on only a single, small management firm (D.C. Partners for the Revitalization of Education Projects) to oversee construction. That's contrary to the proven approach to controlling costs, which uses multiple firms.
Third, the budgets were made before all educational specifications and community input was in hand.

At Duke Ellington School, the budget was blown on the day they turned earth, because the city planned to reconstruct a century-old structure rather than build an entirely new one (which would have been cheaper). Chancellor Kaya Henderson then announced that the school's total space would expand some 60 percent (from 172,000 to 280,000 square feet), ballooning the cost by another $82 million. An underground parking garage was added for $6 million; even that didn't include the cost of demolishing the structures at the garage site, excavation, and the structural steel needed to build the garage. And the final cost of the parking garage was double the cost of an underground parking garage anywhere else in the city, for reasons which still haven't been explained.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/dcs-vaunted-high-school-for-the-arts-reopens--100-million-over-budget/2017/08/16/8ab5abd2-73bc-11e7-8839-ec48ec4cae25_story.html

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It's too bad that the 11th Street Bridges couldn't have been as well-designed. But those only lead to a black ghetto, so I guess it's not as important....

The 11th Street Bridges was the previous record-holder for most expensive public works in the District.

Imagine: It was only in 2002 that D.C. established an independent Department of Transportation. Prior to that, the city's roads and streets were in appalling condition. DDOT has done some amazing, astonishing things with the city's infrastructure.

https://www.bizjournals.com/washington/news/2017/08/10/the-biggest-public-works-project-in-d-c-history.html

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