Stream

Join this community to post or comment
Pinned by moderator

Agile+
owner

Read Here First  - 
 
STOP! Don't post yet! Read the "About this community" box to learn the rules for posting in this community. If you don't follow the rules, your post will likely be removed without warning. More instructions --> https://docs.google.com/document/d/1qWhX4BVjD1O3ROTRs2U53kyJeSaCnTQrqqYrJA4qyjg/edit?usp=sharing
8
1
David Corking's profile photoAlan Dayley's profile photoPaul VII's profile photo
5 comments
 
+David Corking Ah, yes. Different screen orientation and settings shift things around. Hopefully people are learning to look for the "About" box of all the communities that they join.
Add a comment...
 
Trying to shift to a new paradigm as an agile coach is not happening from day one.
http://agilegreece.org/an-agile-coach-paradigm-shift/ #agile   #agilecoach  
I find my self often observing and reflecting what i am …
2
Add a comment...

Amitai Schlair

Discussion  - 
 
Here's a story from my last job of responsibly getting legacy code under test, then beginning to reap the rewards. It's the second story in a series on the human value of practicing TDD.
3
2
Stefan Clepce's profile photoChris Jones's profile photo
Add a comment...
 
Hi guys! Many companies use outsourcing services for some of their  software development projects. Would you as proponents of Agile  do so? Please take part in our 2 min survey & help us complete our small research: https://codersclan.typeform.com/to/kdf8Ps
Results of the study will be published on http://blog.codersclan.net next month. 

Thanks for your participation!

#code #outsource #softwaredevelopment   #software   #softwaredeveloper   #projectmanagement   #productmanagement   #productmanagers   #software #startup #startups #development   #developers
CodersClan is conducting research on companies' software development outsourcing behavior. Please note that no personal information will be collected and participation in this survey is completely anonymous. If you wish to receive the results of our research please email us at ...
1
Add a comment...
 
Need help
Looks like my firm has canceled all expenses and travel for second quarter.  I am not going to the Scrum Alliance conference.  Any tips on how to change my registration and refund some money.
1
Edward Wisniowski's profile photoEdward Wisniowski's profile photo
3 comments
 
Airline flight is canceled.
Add a comment...

Adi Bolboaca

Discussion  - 
 
Learn how to use pure functions when working with existing code. By extracting pure functions you can see how to structure the responsibilities in small functions. These functions can be extracted later on into classes with clear responsibilities.

Check out my new code cast: Extract Pure Functions on Legacy Code http://bit.ly/1O65Nua
4
Daniel Markham's profile photo
 
There is much goodness in pure functions, even if you continue to live in OO-land
Add a comment...

Bill Buse

Discussion  - 
 
After going through the Scrum Master course a week ago, I decided to  take advantage of some quiet time on this Saturday morning and take the exam.  I passed the exam with flying colors and am now a Certified Scrum Master.  
6
1
Bill Buse's profile photoDaniel Markham's profile photoDavid Snyder's profile photo
5 comments
 
Yay!
Add a comment...
 
Are you using Test Driven Development? Here's one take on the top 5 benefits.  http://tbcg.co/1DoNnmO
You've heard of test driven development and you may even be using it, but are you getting the full benefit from TDD? In our opinion, here are the top five benefits of Test Driven Development:   Faster Feedback: Through TDD, your team will have almost immediate feedback on the components they develop and test. This shorter feedback loop allows for much faster turnaround on resolution of defects compared to traditional waterfall methodology where c...
11
2
Bill Buse's profile photoDarren Neimke's profile photoGeoffrey Dunn's profile photo
 
In the Agile training I was in a week ago Test Driven Development was strongly stressed as an important component of Agile 
Add a comment...

Daniel Markham

New to Agile/Lean  - 
 
I love reading developers complain about Agile stuff. It shows where we're not teaching it well and where folks keep doing things differently from the way they should. (If we keep an open mind about it, it also might show where we're teaching the wrong thing.)

http://kristopherwilson.com/2015/03/09/the-daily-stand-up-is-an-antipattern/
9
2
Geoffrey Dunn's profile photoSteve Sether's profile photoRobert Sieber's profile photoMladen Knežić's profile photo
13 comments
 
Standups are really a mixed bag.  Where I work we have a daily standup meeting, but it's far, far less structured than what people are describing.  It's a very informal meeting where we talk about whatever issues we have, or what's going on in the company.  It's useful, though lately has turned into a complaint forum.

I also have a daily status meeting with members of the parent company.  This one I dread, and is mostly counter-productive.  It's far more formalized and structured.  This one happens far too often, and could be done perhaps twice a week rather than every day.
Add a comment...
 
Big Apple Scrum Day is a one day Agile conference in NYC organized by members of NYC Scrum User Group. It is a Scrum Day, but it's not  just about Scrum!
2
Add a comment...
5
1
Daniel Markham's profile photoWutipong Wongsakuldej's profile photo
 
Here's a followup to this article by the author:

"...TL;DR is that developers just didn't find it useful. Sometimes they knew the code was a hot spot, sometimes they didn't. But knowing that the code was a hot spot didn't provide them with any means of effecting change for the better. Imagine a compiler that just said "Hey, I think this code you just wrote is probably buggy" but then didn't tell you where, and even if you knew and fixed it, would still say it due to the fact it was maybe buggy recently. That's what TWR essentially does. That became understandably frustrating, and we have many other signals that developers can act on (e.g. FindBugs), and we risked drowning out those useful signals with this one.

Some teams did find it useful for getting individual team reports so they could focus on places for refactoring efforts, but from a global perspective, it just seemed to frustrate, so it was turned down.
From an academic perspective, I consider the paper one of my most impactful contributions, because it highlights to the bug prediction community some harsh realities that need to be overcome for bug prediction to be useful to humans. So I think the whole project was quite successful... Note that the Rahman algorithm that TWR was based on did pretty well in developer reviews at finding bad code, so it's possible it could be used for automated tools effectively, e.g. test case prioritization so you can find failures earlier in the test suite. I think automated uses are probably the most fruitful area for bug prediction efforts to focus on in the near-to-mid future."
Add a comment...

Created by

About this community

READ THIS PLEASE! Posts that do not follow these rules may be removed without warning. WELCOME to the Agile+ community. Agile+ is NOT some new Agile framework. We are a Google+ community interested in all things related to Agile ideas as defined by the Agile Manifesto. Feel free to share any interesting agile/lean posts. When you post links, include some text as to why you find the particular link interesting to Agile ideas. If you are posting under an entity name (company, organization, etc.) you MUST "plus" your personal self as the author. "Individuals and interactions" are what we are after! No sales pitches. No job postings. There are many other channels for such important information. - Agile+ Team: James O'Sullivan, Miguel Rodriguez, Mike Bowler, Alan Dayley and Geoffrey Dunn
 
Reality today is that we are involved in Distributed Teams. What are your best practices? http://tbcg.co/1D9shEx
In an ideal world, your scrum team would be co-located and daily meetings would be face-to-face, but in today’s world that is not always possible. Sometimes teams are spread across multiple office locations, multiple states, and even multiple countries.As a ScrumMaster, you own the responsibility of managing effective communication and collaboration with distributed team members.  Collaboration on your distributed teams should be a top priority a...
1
Alan Dayley's profile photo
 
Nice, practical article.

I don't have any "best practices." I do have some good ones. I'll add one here.

Go get an old laptop from IT. They always have plenty on hand. Get Skype or Lync or Google Hangout installed on it with it's own account. Add a $50-$100 high definition webcam with microphone and a cheap external speaker. Mount the webcam on a small, cheap tripod. Mount the whole setup on a rolling laptop stand or cart. This is the team's remote presence system to video call with remote people. Roll it from meeting to meeting. Keep it connecte and live in the team room.

Make one of these for every team.
Add a comment...

Rufus J

New to Agile/Lean  - 
 
Can anyone let me , what is #agile ? You can refer : http://goo.gl/PQh9kl
1
Add a comment...

Isaac Sacolick

Discussion  - 
 
From experience. What would you add?
The CIO must learn and drive the business, set the strategic direction for IT and proves that he or she can get teams executing to the strategy. I've posted many times on how agile practices are key to a CIO's success because it creates transparency, dives culture change, and is a key element to ...
4
2
Matt Galloway's profile photoDarren Neimke's profile photo
Add a comment...
 
A blog that is very dark
Want to see some things that will ruin your agile implementation.  Here is a blog to show you some of the darkness which lurks in organizational change.
Courtesy of the Harvard business review. Being a change agent is hard even for a King. The life of an agile profession both in the corporate world and as an entrepreneur is filled with uncertainty.  Big wins are offset by fru...
3
Rod Dunne's profile photo
2 comments
 
d'oh.... Culture eats strategy ;)
Add a comment...
 
A post in portugues writen by a noob in agile development
 ·  Translate
A crise de software foi considerada um reflexo da falta de modelos de processo, de métodos e de ferramentas na produção de software, que ate então era realizada de modo artesanal.   Neste período a...
1
Add a comment...

Thomas Horan

Discussion  - 
 
My first blog post, please feel free to leave any feedback.
4
1
Scotty Bevill's profile photoRobert Sieber's profile photo
 
Preconceptions and "shoulds" drive me crazy sometimes too. lol. Great message. Thanks for sharing. 
Add a comment...
 
I've tried Planning Poker for over two years. I've seen it working, but I've also seen it miserably failing. About a year ago we were working on a team were Planning Poker was giving us huge headaches. We decided to change, and here is the story.
I wrote this post together with Jeff Weishaupt, the Product Owner of the team that we mention on this article. Thanks to him for all the input (and the grammar corrections).
8
1
Nick Gorin's profile photoMatthias Nietz's profile photo
 
sayonara community
Add a comment...
 
This article introduces the risk-driven model of architectural design. Its essential idea is that the effort you spend on designing your software architecture should be commensurate with the risks faced by your project.
#softwarearchitecture  
Using a risk-driven model to achieve an Agile software architecture
1
Add a comment...
 
Dealing with Disappointment
A new blog this week talking about disappointment.
We will talk about technology, business and logistics.
3
Edward Wisniowski's profile photoSteve Sether's profile photo
3 comments
 
Sorry to hear your experience this week has been demotivating.  

Coding is easy, business is hard.  Years ago I created several lines of business, including online backup.  It all worked quite well for version 1, but my business partner wasn't experienced enough in marketing and selling and we never had the capital to hire someone who did.  I'm not a sales guy either, so I couldn't help in that department.  

So I think you need to get OK with failing.  One way to look at it is that if you're not failing, you're not trying things that are just beyond your skill level.

I did learn a lot from my failed business venture though.  A lot of thinking about product design, and simply getting something out the door ASAP.  Also that you don't want all customers.  Some customers cost you a lot of money and aren't worth having.  
Add a comment...