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Read Here First  - 
 
STOP! Don't post yet! Read the "About this community" box to learn the rules for posting in this community. If you don't follow the rules, your post will likely be removed without warning. More instructions --> https://docs.google.com/document/d/1qWhX4BVjD1O3ROTRs2U53kyJeSaCnTQrqqYrJA4qyjg/edit?usp=sharing
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David Corking's profile photoAlan Dayley's profile photoPaul VII's profile photo
5 comments
 
+David Corking Ah, yes. Different screen orientation and settings shift things around. Hopefully people are learning to look for the "About" box of all the communities that they join.
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Isaac Sacolick

Discussion  - 
 
More on IT culture. If this post interests you, let me know your thoughts on how you identify and address culture issues
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Steve Sether's profile photoIsaac Sacolick's profile photo
2 comments
 
These are behaviors I have seen across multiple orgs, teams and individuals in multiple companies spanning 10 years. While some are behavioral, others are tactical and collectively they are things I think both individuals and teams need to work on.

Is that culture? No, not in by itself. But strong cultures and culture changes are often influenced bottoms up. So yes, I believe that improving, correcting, or changing some contributes to cultural improvements.

Thanks for the comment and your insights.

My recent post was an attempt to present an actionable list of focus areas. I included the bad behaviors to suggest that if you see this in your team, then focus on that. Perhaps this wasn't clear. 
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Gojko Adzic

Discussion  - 
 
Our new book, Fifty Quick Ideas To Improve Your Tests, is now 100% complete, and the eBook is available on Amazon at half price until Friday. 

This book is for cross-functional teams working in an iterative delivery environment, planning with user stories and testing frequently changing software under tough time pressure. This book will help you test your software better, easier and faster. Many of these ideas also help teams engage their business stakeholders better in defining key expectations and improve the quality of their software products.

For more info, book sample and links to download, see http://www.50quickideas.com/fifty-quick-ideas-to-improve-your-tests
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Judith Andresen's profile photoTobias Ranft's profile photo
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Learning and Teaching
This week the blog talks about why a agilest should be a good teacher and student.
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"If you want your boss to support your company’s Agile transformation and introduction of Scrum, you just have to teach her… Agile and Scrum." by +Giuseppe De Simone 
http://agilegreece.org/why-you-should-teach-scrum-to-your-boss-and-how/
#agile   #scrum   #leadership  
One of the biggest challenges when introducing Scrum is …
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Team Xcelerator Inc.'s profile photoReggie Hillery's profile photo
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Isaac Sacolick

Discussion  - 
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Geoffrey Dunn's profile photoDan Swain's profile photoHabib Jalili's profile photo
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This reads like it was written in an ivory tower where the person gets to mandate what behaviours they think are good or bad, it's bad when people don't align with the target architecture I dreamed up in my ivory tower. If you're not questioning standards and always blindly following what your told are then you're missing an opportunity to improve the system.

Holding back and under committing, personally I'm not happy committing 110% and pushing the limit of what can be done in some arbitrary time frame.

My advice would be get out the ivory tower.
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Adi Bolboaca

Discussion  - 
 
During this episode you will see how to add unit tests to code extracted from a legacy code class. These tests have a small granularity level than the characterization tests we already have. This is the moment to dive more into details.

See this video to understand how you can document the current state of the system, by unit testing on legacy code.

http://bit.ly/1Hd8ITc
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Mozaic Works's profile photo
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Adam Sobotka

Discussion  - 
 
I almost completely disagree (see comment in original post), but it might be interesting topic to discuss here :-)
 
Should more leaders be micromanagers?
Patrick Lencioni knows a thing or two about micromanagement. As founder and president of the Table Group, and the author of 10 bestselling books, including The Advantage and The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, he's seen it all. I interviewed him about the subject, and his thoughts on the matter might surprise you. Travis Bradberry: [...]
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Alan Dayley's profile photoEdward Wisniowski's profile photo
3 comments
 
Yes, this is more about understanding what the team is doing.
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Gregory Mooney

New to Agile/Lean  - 
 
This thorough recap of Dan North's keynote at StarEAST , covers everything to consider when practicing agile testing.
Dan North presented at STAREAST about deliberate app testing in Agile, risk management, and identifying gaps in your testing approach.
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Giorgio Vespucci's profile photoAlex Kempkens's profile photo
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Alan Dayley
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
The Global Scrum Gathering Phoenix has been going on these last three days. I have not attended many sessions but a lot of the sessions came to me! The +SolutionsIQ team in partnership with the +Scrum Alliance have been interviewing many of the speakers and other attendees. I had the opportunity to conduct a bunch of the interviews. It was great fun!

Almost all the videos are posted on the day we recorded them. Right now there are just a few still going up. I hope you something interesting, educational and fun!
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Alan Dayley's profile photoJohn Miller's profile photo
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About this community

READ THIS PLEASE! Posts that do not follow these rules may be removed without warning. WELCOME to the Agile+ community. Agile+ is NOT some new Agile framework. We are a Google+ community interested in all things related to Agile ideas as defined by the Agile Manifesto. Feel free to share any interesting agile/lean posts. When you post links, include some text as to why you find the particular link interesting to Agile ideas. If you are posting under an entity name (company, organization, etc.) you MUST "plus" your personal self as the author. "Individuals and interactions" are what we are after! No sales pitches. No job postings. There are many other channels for such important information. - Agile+ Team: James O'Sullivan, Miguel Rodriguez, Mike Bowler, Alan Dayley and Geoffrey Dunn

Steve Sether

Discussion  - 
 
Is this Agile?

I've come across some ideas I'm not really certain are part of Agile, or at the very least are what I'd assume are distortions of Agile.  These haven't been my precepts, but I can certainly accept the fact that I've been totally wrong all this time.

 Personally I believe any movement is defined by the people, so I'm asking anyone here to comment if this is how you practice Agile (specifically scrum).  Namely:

1. Everyone in an Agile team is replaceable by anyone else.  i.e. the cross-functionality goes as far as same-functionality, and nobody is specialized in any way.  If one team member goes on vacation, the work can be picked up with little effort by someone else.

2. You can set an end date on a project at the beginning of the project, and make that deadline within some small error bars.
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Rod Dunne's profile photo
9 comments
 
On Q2. See +Harold Meder 's comment - the scope is flexible. You can always set an end date for the project, prioritise the User Stories so the most important are done up front and time box interim releases (end of each sprint). Is it perhaps that the difficulty you are experiencing (which I've seen a lot) is 'Waterfall' mid-management with a requirements list that are 100% must-haves. In this case, its mid management that need to be coached on Agile culture :) 
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Amitai Schlair

Discussion  - 
 
Here's another story from my last job, sixth in a series on the human value of practicing TDD. This one's about a project with a hard deadline, and about how we took just enough from Scrum to get us there safely. (We delivered on the day of the deadline, with several minutes to spare. ;-) In several ways, TDD made it possible.

If you like these stories, come to Agile Roots (http://www.agileroots.com/) next month and hear some of them -- and some new ones -- in person!
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Gordon Mullan's profile photoGeoffrey Dunn's profile photo
 
Well done!
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Franco Martinig

Discussion  - 
 
Self-selection is a facilitated process of letting people self-organise into small, cross-functional teams. We think it is the fastest and most efficient way to form stable teams, based on the belief that people are at their happiest and most productive if they can choose what they work on and who they work with. #projectmanagement  
Self-selection is a process of letting people group into small Agile and Scrum cross-functional teams
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John Thompson's profile photoGordon Mullan's profile photo
2 comments
 
Great article - would love to give it a try!
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Adi Bolboaca

Discussion  - 
 
Bug or Feature? This is a tough question to answer when working with existing code. Watch this code cast to lean three ways to document possible defects that you can discuss later with analysts or with business people.

http://blog.adrianbolboaca.ro/2015/05/document-possible-bugs-with-tests-code-cast
Bug or feature? Find how to solve this eternal problem and learn how to document possible bugs with tests.
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David Koontz

Discussion  - 
 
So ... you've seen the news that 14% of Zappos employees have taken the exit package.  They opted out of the Holacracy transformation.  What's that mean in the big picture?

Oh... 86% of the people support the initiative.  WOW!  Wouldn't you love to be in that organization.  A place that has engagement, that has alignment to the mission, and a way to allow the non-aligned to exit with grace and dignity.  Now that's a powerful transformation.

An this Holacracy stuff - what's it all about... oh crap, that self-organization, and self-management stuff.

Read more about Holacracy and many other ways of embracing the coming downfall of Hierarchal Command & Control in 

Examples of 21st C. Companies
http://agilecomplexificationinverter.blogspot.com/2014/06/examples-of-21st-c-companies.html
"The 21st Century is when it all changes.  You've got to be ready."  -- Capt'n Jack Harkness What does a 21st Century company look like?  Here's some principles, some templates, some examples.  I believe the 21st century will...
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David Koontz's profile photoSteve Sether's profile photoDavid Barker's profile photo
12 comments
 
+David Koontz Thanks for the clarification.  That actually alleviates my fears about such an organization.  There's still leaders and "deciders", it's just leaves a lot of decision making where it belongs, at the bottom where the most information is.
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A new blog talking about the winds of change
My 22 year old self would not recognize the man I am today.
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Rajat Taneja

Discussion  - 
 
[Free Agile Webinar] Learn how you can deal with emergencies in a lean/scrum team

Join this free webinar to learn how you can cope with the nightmares of production & dev emergencies and plan for changes by applying strategic & tactical thinking during a sprint.
Limited seats! Register at: https://goo.gl/jr2r9B
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Is it really? Or is it an extension into operations areas? http://tbcg.co/1EVq8QK
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John Miller's profile photoDan Swain's profile photo
8 comments
 
Small cross functional teams, it used to be a separation of dev and qa, but there was no devqa movement or dev dba, I'm personally waiting for devgov where we get to collaborate with all those governance people.
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Holger Schauer

Discussion  - 
 
Andy Hunt, too, thinks that agile failed and has been working on a new method. However, I think the meat of the article is captured in this excerpt: "The only way for beginners to be effective is to follow simple, context-free rules; rules of the form: ”When this happens, do that.” And since agile methods conveniently provide some concrete practices to start with, new teams latch on to those, or part of those, and get stuck there.

So instead of looking up to the agile principles and the abstract ideas of the agile manifesto, folks get as far as the perceived iron rules of a set of practices, and no further.

Agile methods ask practitioners to think, and frankly, that‘s a hard sell. It is far more comfortable to simply follow what rules are given and claim you're “doing it by the book.” It’s easy, it’s safe from ridicule or recrimination; you won’t get fired for it. While we might publicly decry the narrow confines of a set of rules, there is safety and comfort there. But of course, to be agile—or effective—isn’t about comfort."
I am proud to be one of the 17 founders/authors of the The Agile Manifesto back in 2001. I think it provided a jolt of energy, hope of a better way of doing things, of creating software and making the...
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Alan Dayley's profile photoGeoffrey Dunn's profile photoGiorgio Vespucci's profile photo
2 comments
 
The ability to think critically and empathetically is very important to the success of an Agile team.

I've had teams say Agile lets them design/code themselves into a corner because they're only thinking about the current story, not the many to come later.
I've also had teams struggle with understanding the product owner unable to comprehend their needs and wanting a itemised list of requirements.

These are both styles of teams that are not understanding what Agile asks of them. I believe this kind of thinking can be taught so I don't put it as a prerequisite. But it's important to consider in building that team of motivated, happy, vocal and creative people.
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Amitai Schlair

Discussion  - 
 
Here's another story from my last job, fourth in a series on the human value of practicing TDD. This one's about waste, risk, temper, and teamwork. http://www.schmonz.com/2015/05/06/tdd-in-context-4-continual-delivery/

If you like this series, come to Agile Roots in June, where you can hear my experience report "Shoestring Agility in a Velcro Organization". Conference session list: http://www.agileroots.com/sessions/
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Amitai Schlair's profile photoGordon Mullan's profile photo
3 comments
 
Not specifically - just enjoying hearing your journey
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