A global community interested in systems science(s). Includes members of the International Society for the Systems Sciences.
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David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
Intervening in a system involves both synthesis and analysis. @DubberlyDesign outlined a bridge model that frames approaches, including Rick Robertson, Stafford Beer, Christopher Alexander, Vijay Kumar, Kaiser (with Ideo) and Suri (with Ideo).

> While practitioners and educators increasingly make use of models, few forefront the role of modeling in public summaries of their work processes. Glossing over modeling can limit design to the world of form-making and misses an opportunity to push toward interaction and experience. We see modeling becoming an integral part of practice, especially in designing software, services, and other complex systems.
> The bridge model makes explicit the role of modeling in the design process. Explicit modeling is useful in at least two ways. First, it accelerates the design process by encouraging team members to understand and agree on the elements of a system and how those elements interact with each other and their environment. Second, by making the elements and their interactions visible, it reduces the likelihood of overlooking differences in point of view, which might otherwise eventually derail a project.

Hugh Dubberley, Shelley Evenson and Rick Robinson | "
On modeling: The analysis-synthesis bridge model" | March + April 2008 | Interactions magazine (ACM http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1340961.1340976 ) and open access at http://www.dubberly.com/articles/interactions-the-analysis-synthesis-bridge-model.html
Written for Interactions magazine by Hugh Dubberly, Shelley Evenson, and Rick Robinson. The simplest way to describe the design process is to divide it into two phases: analysis and synthesis. Or preparation and inspiration. But those descriptions miss a crucial element—the connection between ...
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David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
Aspiring towards job growth and ecological sustainability? Embrace inefficiency and encourage urban agriculture. Ian Clarke, a dean at OCADU, writes:

> It’s time we learned to embrace inefficiency. That may sound like heresy in a time when we are told that we must increase our competitiveness to become leaner, to increase productivity, to become more efficient to compete in the global marketplace. But it’s time we stop to reflect on how we use the term “efficient” and the consequences of this goal on the future employment prospects of millions of Canadians, and on the environment.

> The burgeoning urban and near-urban agriculture trend in North America and around the world exemplifies how many small-scale, entrepreneurial businesses are inherently inefficient in how much labour they use. But this is something we should encourage and recognize as important for both economies and societies. When we talk about efficiency, we are usually talking about producing the most product or service for the least input or cost, including labour cost. But this definition of efficiency is counterproductive for job creation and for the environment. In Canada, we’ve seen a shift from large, industrial employers to service and entrepreneurial sector jobs.

"Urban agriculture may be inefficient, but it’s a model for a sustainable future" | Ian Clarke | Aug. 10, 2016 | Globe and Mail at http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/rob-commentary/urban-agriculture-may-be-inefficient-but-its-a-model-for-a-sustainable-future/article31334351/
Our obsession with productivity and efficiency comes at the expense of meaningful jobs and quality of life. Urban agriculture is a model for another way
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Karl Schultheisz's profile photoJaime Saldarriaga's profile photo
2 comments
 
Or an optimal combination of economic and ecological efficiency.
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David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
Australia ground moves north 7cm per year, the map will be overcorrected in 2017 and then realigned in 2020. How will autonomous cars respond when the map is not the territory?

> The Geocentric Datum of Australia, the country's local co-ordinate system, was last updated in 1994. Since then, Australia has moved about 1.5 metres north.

> So on 1 January 2017, the country's local co-ordinates will also be shifted further north - by 1.8m.

> The over-correction means Australia's local co-ordinates and the Earth's global co-ordinates will align in 2020.

[....]

> "If you want to start using driverless cars, accurate map information is fundamental," said Mr Jaksa.

> "We have tractors in Australia starting to go around farms without a driver, and if the information about the farm doesn't line up with the co-ordinates coming out of the navigation system there will be problems."

"Australia plans new co-ordinates to fix sat-nav gap" | Chris Foxx | July 29, 2015 | BBC News at http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-36912700
Australia is to shift its longitude and latitude to address a gap between local co-ordinates and those from global navigation satellite systems (GNSS).
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Jack Ring's profile photo
 
Really North? Perhaps Northeast?
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David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
In Cleveland, politicians are afraid of whole fruit and tennis balls. Guns are okay if licensed in Ohio or a state with reciprocity.

> The “open carry” gun law basically means that legally permitted firearms can be carried unconcealed and loaded by Ohio residents and visitors – so long as their home state has a reciprocity agreement with Ohio.

> Guns allowed: handguns, long guns, shotguns and some assault rifles such as an AK-47.

> The weapons will not be allowed inside the convention arena. But in the 4.4 square kilometre “event zone” around the arena, the state’s open carry policy will apply.

> That creates an interesting juxtaposition of what will be allowed and not allowed inside the event zone, according to a list provided by the city of Cleveland.

> Some of the deadliest weapons, such as automatic machine guns, are exempt from the state’s open carry policy. These guns – called a “dangerous ordinance” under Ohio law – or any other weapon designed to fire more than 31 cartridges without reloading are not permitted.

> Also, the open carry rules do not permit a person to brandish the weapon or hide it from view. In order to carry a concealed weapon, gun owners must apply for a permit.

"'Open carry' law highlights Cleveland's safety priorities" | +Affan Chowdhry | July 19, 2016 | Globe and Mail at http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/the-republican-national-convention-monday/article30914573/ . Illustration by Trish McAlaster for The Globe and Mail.
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Mic Norton's profile photoDavid Ing's profile photo
2 comments
 
+Mic Norton, this community is a systems science community, so I'll try to answer authentically with two points.

Firstly, I'm a Canadian, and firearms are restricted in Canada, see http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/fs-fd/restr-eng.htm . My sister and brother have emigrated to the U.S. In my career, I spent half of my time working in U.S. organizations, which continuously residing in Toronto. I'm not interested in changing residence to move to the United States. My wife and four sons have been covered under the education system and healthcare system in the Province of Ontario. I've been in Finland once or twice every year since 2003, and they don't have the issues that the U.S.A. does.

Secondly, I've been having discussions with Ian Mitroff (who lives in California), and he's quite riled up about guns in the U.S. For discussion on how "more leads to more" could instead be "less leads to more", see his writing, "Regulating Guns: The Social Equivalent of MAD (Mutually Assured Destruction)" | January 19, 2016 | Huffington Post at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ian-i-mitroff/regulating-guns-the-socia_b_9010574.html
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Bob Stanke

Discussion  - 
 
Google's Project Bloks looks like a great initiative for kids (aka "Future System Thinkers)! --> http://www.bobstanke.com/blog/googles-project-bloks-introduces-children-to-tangible-programming
An effort that I am extremely passionate about is getting children interested in the world of computer programming. I believe that there needs to be a stronger effort by our education system to get curriculum introduced that exposes children to programming at a young age. There are so many benefits to learning how to code, even if a child's future career path does not involve any sort of hands-on technology. Computer programming te...
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Bob Stanke

Discussion  - 
 
Recommended books on Systems Thinking --> http://www.bobstanke.com/blog/systems-thinking-books
I have started putting together a list of systems thinking books under the "Resources" section of my website. Some of these books I have read, while others are on my current "to read" list. I do plan on going through and writing up thoughts on each books individually, but did want to have round-up page as reference. I still have a bunch of books to add to the page, but if you have any suggestions for me to add, please let me know (...
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Bob Stanke

Discussion  - 
 
Systems are complex and that is why I love them. -- http://www.bobstanke.com/blog/building-new-systems-to-help-build-other-new-systems
Systems are extremely complex entities. Many of us don’t realize that on a daily basis because we interact with so many different kinds of systems seamlessly throughout our days. If you take any form of transportation to work each morning, you are interacting with traffic systems, and inside those traffic systems, other transportation systems like train systems, detour systems, and traffic light systems, for example. If you or someon...
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David Ing's profile photoBob Stanke's profile photo
3 comments
 
+David Ing Any level of complexity is in the eye of the beholder, is what I believe. What is complex to me, might not be to someone else. But from a broader point of view, I think systems are inherently complex given that they have so many moving components, including the most complex components of all... humans!
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Perhaps someone in this group will know the name of a project that had a showcase video/animation on YouTube recently (not older than 2 or 3 years) in which some kind of software generating system marketplace was shown and proposed. The "revolutionary" and new aspect of it is that it treated each software component as composable almost in holonic manner with all the other components, and the whole system is realized as on-demand marketplace in which paid agents develop components of the system in various roles (the 2 roles I remember were either supervision or contribution to component creation). What I remember is that the animation and production level was professional. Perhaps someone from this group is involved in that very project and knows the name of it?

Such infrastructure which is actually a marketplace-as-a-software-fabrication-infrastructure of interoperable software components in which software systems can be built is perhaps suitable for building many quite complex yet stable systems.

It's as if the metaphor of "grid computing" that is usually reserved for hardware domain is lately being applied in domain of software services and the building of software complexes in streamlined fashion. The closest analogue I spotted out there is currently Neureal (http://neureal.net/).

I also posted a question on Quora: https://www.quora.com/unanswered/What-is-the-name-of-a-project-idea-aiming-to-create-a-composable-software-marketplace-where-modules-could-be-specified-in-higher-level-language-terms
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André Reichel

Discussion  - 
 
This is an extended summary of an upcoming research article in a special issue on organizing for the postgrowth economy (ephemera). I apply the "Laws of Form" by George Spencer Brown to phenomena like digitization and economic stagnation in order to arrive at a "Form of the Firm in the Next Economy". Feedback very much appreciated!
 
Applying George Spencer Brown and the »Laws of Form« to issues of #Postgrowth: Towards a new Form of the Firm in the Next Economy... 
From Now to Next: The Form of the Firm in the Next Economy. 2016/06/23 at 16:38. tl;dr: If you have a proper formal model, you can sketch a future for companies that enables them to create a convivial society beyond growth.
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Jose A Munoz Mata's profile photo
 
Nice reading. I share some of the thoughts and approach for a post growth era in industrialized countries, the OECD ones mainly.
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David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
In 2016, Harvard Business Review acknowledges Agile methods, having originated in 2001 with a manifesto amongst software developers. The Scrum processes have practices, where managers sometimes claim "agile but ... (we don't carry out a technique)" or hide behind "fake Agile".

> Agile is the antidote to shareholder value. Agile aligns with Peter Drucker’s 1954 foundational insight: “The only valid purpose of a firm is to create a customer.” It is the management basis for the emerging Creative Economy. It is the foundation for continuous innovation. It is the key to the extraordinary success of firms in Silicon Valley, like Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple with a combined net worth of some $1.3 trillion.

> Agile is therefore at odds with “the biggest idea in business”—shareholder value.

> Agile is a revolutionary challenge to the management status quo. It is a Copernican revolution in management akin to the Copernican revolution in astronomy. The center of the commercial universe is no longer the firm: it is the customer. Agile therefore has vast implications has to how an organization is run.

> Viewing Agile as a methodology to be implemented within a culture of shareholder value misstates the revolutionary implications of Agile. It also risks missing most of its benefits with flawed Agile implementation. When Agile is viewed and implemented merely as a methodology within the existing management framework, Agile can become a travesty of the real thing. It can become what Jeff Sutherland himself has called “Scrum-butt” and what others have labeled “fake Agile.”

> To get the benefits of Agile, managers not only have to “do Agile.” They have to “be Agile.”

> In some respects, the HBR article is talking about “doing Agile.” For instance, when the HBR article says that “A number of companies have reallocated 25% or more of selected leaders’ time from functional silos to agile leadership teams” it is embracing the external forms of Agile, while missing the driving force behind it. It is talking about “doing Agile,” not “being Agile.”

"HBR's Embrace Of Agile" | +Stephen Denning | April 21, 2016 | Forbes at http://www.forbes.com/sites/stevedenning/2016/04/21/hbrs-embrace-of-agile

"Embracing Agile | Darrell K. Rigby, +Jeff Sutherland, Hirotaka Takeuchi Hirotaka Takeuchi | May 2016 | Harvard Business Review at https://hbr.org/2016/05/embracing-agile

"Scrum and Organizational Patterns | Jeff Sutherland | May 20, 2013 | Scrum Inc. at https://www.scruminc.com/scrum-and-organizational-patterns/
Agile is a mindset, not a methodology
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David Ing's profile photoJukka-Pekka Ovaska's profile photo
7 comments
 
I was actually thinking about Interactive Planning and SSM yesterday while doing some planning for our team's marketing efforts. I am currently trying to combine design oriented methods with systems thinking and content marketing. I'm trying to understand the client organization and our end users by conducting interviews with our architects and sales personnel and then developing empathy by using customer profiling and other such techniques. One particularly interesting technique I've been using is the "jobs-to-be-done" framework from Tony Ulwick: https://strategyn.com/tony-ulwick/ Hopefully I will also get permission to conduct end user interviews to get first-hand feedback on our products and the customer's problems. I'm also trying to use the interactive planning process to guide my overall work (not necessarily succeeding at it though). Finally, I'm also doing my best to understand the motives of my supervisor and our industry marketing partner so my own goals and actions are aligned with the rest of the organization. Hopefully synthesis will precede analysis and I'll also be able to avoid type III errors.

Bateson is great. For me one of the more interesting topics in systems sciences has always been learning. How does sensemaking occur at the individual level and at the level of the organization? How to create a sense-and-respond organization? How to use dialogue and storytelling for learning?
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David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
Cognitive overload is beyond AI as a challenge for IBM, says Ginni Rometty in +Kara Swisher interview +Recode conference. T-shaped breadth in cognitive computing has depth in industry domain knowledge. Beyond teaching-learning reading and mechanical skills, new jobs will need data skills.

Cognitive overload as business opportunity for IBM since 2005 | Ginni Rometty | June 1, 2016 | Code Conference (web video + audio) at https://daviding.wordpress.com/2016/06/11/cognitive-overload-ibm/
Cognitive overload is a challenge IBM has worked since 2005, says @GinniRometty in @KaraSwisher interview @RecodeEvents. Thus, cognitive computing combining man and machine is more than artificial …
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About this community

The International Society for the Systems Sciences (ISSS) is among the first and oldest organizations devoted to interdisciplinary inquiry into the nature of complex systems, and remains perhaps the most broadly inclusive. Originally founded as the Society for General Systems Research, the initial purpose of the society was "to encourage the development of theoretical systems which are applicable to more than one of the traditional departments of knowledge," with the following principal aims: to investigate the isomorphy of concepts, laws, and models in various fields, and to help in useful transfers from one field to another; to encourage the development of adequate theoretical models in areas which lack them; to eliminate the duplication of theoretical efforts in different fields; and to promote the unity of science through improving the communication among specialists. In the intervening years, the ISSS has expanded its scope beyond purely theoretical and technical considerations to include the practical application of systems methodologies to problem solving. Even more importantly, it has provided a forum where scholars and practitioners from across the disciplinary spectrum, representing academic, business, government, and non-profit communities, can come together to share ideas and learn from one another.

David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
STEM workers for academia are in surplus; for government in shortage for advanced degrees; and for private sectors regional differences may or may not result in migration. Research on labor in the United State for Science, Technology, Engineering and Management workers.

> The demand and supply of STEM workers vary by market and location in much the same way that the demand and supply of taxicabs and passengers do. Just as there are separate lines for taxicabs that accept credit cards versus ones that do not, there are distinct lines for each type of STEM occupation. [....]

> ... in the academic employment sector, we find no evidence of any shortages. To the contrary, it appears that the mismatch is between an oversupply of Ph.D.’s desiring an academic career and the relative paucity of tenure-track faculty positions.26 Although the degree of mismatch varies according to discipline, we have long queues of Ph.D.’s competing for nearly all STEM-related faculty positions. [....]

> In the government and government-related employment sector, we found no evidence of widespread STEM shortages; however, there may be shortages at the advanced-degree level due to citizenship and security clearance requirements. [....]

> Much of the literature on the STEM crisis emanates from concerns about shortages or surpluses in the private-sector STEM labor market; however, the crisis is generally discussed in broad terms, referencing the STEM workforce as a whole. For example, the report by the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology called for an additional 1 million STEM degrees over the next decade. Similarly, many studies dispute the claim that there are STEM shortages at the aggregate level and point to shortages only in specific fields. [....]

> There are also regional differences in the labor markets for STEM workers.

"STEM crisis or STEM surplus? Yes and yes" | Yi Xue and Richard C. Larson | May 2015 | Monthly Labour Review, Bureau of Labor Statistics at http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2015/article/stem-crisis-or-stem-surplus-yes-and-yes.htm

Via "Is There a STEM Crisis or a STEM Surplus?" | +Irving Wladawsky-Berger | August 9, 2016 at http://blog.irvingwb.com/blog/2016/08/is-there-a-stem-crisis-or-a-stem-surplus.html
The last decade has seen conflicting evidence regarding the number of workers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Some proclaim an impending STEM crisis, others a STEM surplus. Analysis reveals that the academic sector is generally oversupplied while both the government sector and private industry have shortages in specific areas.
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David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
Relational biology argues "function dictates structure", counter to a reductionist or physical presumption that "structure implies function".

> Biology is a subject concerned with organization of relations. Physicochemical theories are only surrogates of biological theories, because the manners in which the shared matter is organized are fundamentally different. Hence the behaviours of the realizations of these mechanistic surrogates are different from those of living systems. This in-kind difference is the impermeable dichotomy between predicativity and impredicativity.

> Relational Biology

> The essence of reductionism in biology is to keep the matter of which an organism is made, and throw away the organization, with the belief that, since physicochemical structure implies function, the organization can be effectively reconstituted from the analytic material parts.

> Relational biology, on the other hand, keeps the organization and throws away the matter; function dictates structure, whence material aspects are entailed.

"Relational Biology" | A. H. Louie at https://ahlouie.com/relational-biology/
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Joel Fairstein's profile photo
 
The article raises some of the core problems in studying living systems and so has some value. I would like to comment on the terminology and inferences in the original article at https://ahlouie.com/relational-biology/.

"Natural Law posits the existence of these entailment relations and that this causal order can be imaged by implicative order."

The term natural law in its common usage does not refer to laws of nature but rather to moral law inherent in humans and the natural world. So the term natural law as used here is misplaced. Even if natural law referred to the laws of nature, the usage in the context of science would be antiquated, harking back to the 18th century. Furthermore, natural law does not posit anything; only humans can do that.

"A natural systems is defined in the article as an object partitioned from the physical universe."

Within contemporary systems theory, any definition of "system" is recognized as problematic, so one must tread carefully. Existing definitions typically ascribe threshold characteristics of systems. "Partitioned" is too wide a net and could apply to almost anything in the universe. By this definition, is a rock a system? Given the topic is biology, surely we would require a few more characteristics, such as homeostasis, membranes, energy exchange, reproduction, and feedback.

"Everything is a set. Every process is a mapping. Together, the two axioms are the mathematical formulation of Natural Law. These self-evident truths serve to explain the unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics in the natural sciences."

Once again, there is no place for the antiquated term "natural law" in discussions of natural systems. And neither of the given axioms are self-evident. "Everything is a set," in this argument, is a statement of correspondence between reality and mathematics but taken within mathematics itself is a tautology that adds nothing to the understanding. The statement "every process is a mapping" has a similar correspondence. Both statements are offered as axioms of formal modeling so that we can operate in the domain of mathematics as a surrogate for reality. However, mathematics itself is not effective at proposing apriori models, which is the essence of scientific method and a creative process. So, mathematics in this light is effective as a tool, not as a method.

The article continues into a critique of reductionism of living systems to physics and goes on to describe relational biology as organization seeking relations and beginning with mathematics. I believe it is simpler to say that we create models to explain biological systems.

"The failure of presumptuous reductionism is that of the inability of a small surrogate universe to exhaust the real one."

This argument applies equally to reductionism to physics and to relational biology, which reduces biology to a surrogate model, albeit at a scope larger than the fundamentals of physics.
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David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
Immigrants to Canada do move up. A refugee rose to become Governor General (the viceregal appointed by Queen Elizabeth II) 1999-2005.

> I married a refugee who arrived here as a small child. They had lost everything, and she did pretty well.

> All of these are immigrant stories; a surprising number are refugee stories. All people making their way. Contributing. Some are ordinary stories. Some extraordinary. The small abandoned boy in Trafalgar Square. The young woman following a man to a country she knew only through him. The young man running up the beach of Normandy on the cusp of history. The little refugee girl becoming governor-general.

> So, when I hear people debating the economics of immigration and refugees, I am always surprised.

"Integral to Canada’s economy, immigrants deserve more support" | John Ralston Saul | July 23, 2016 | Globe & Mail at http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/integral-to-canadas-economy-immigrants-deserve-more-support/article31079752/

Adrienne Clarkson on Wikipedia at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrienne_Clarkson#Governor_General_of_Canada
John Ralston Saul wonders why all Canadians don’t see how new arrivals boost the economy – and do more to help them fit in
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Jack Ring's profile photo
 
My forefathers immigrated in 1620. Beware of the great difference between immigrants vs. illegal immigrants.
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David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
Low wage jobs increased for Ph.D. and master's graduates in Canada, 1997-2008-2014. The economy isn't generating enough high-skill jobs, so supply exceeds demand. Still, the more educated are still better off.

> Of the employees with a MA or PhD, 12.4 per cent were low-income earners in 2014 compared with 7.7 per cent in 1997, according to a study by the Centre for the Study of Living Standards, an economics research group.

"Low-wage earners with graduate degrees on rise, new study shows" | Rachelle Younglai | July 13, 2016 | The Globe & Mail at http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-investor/personal-finance/genymoney/low-wage-earners-with-graduate-degrees-on-rise-new-study-shows/article30892835/

In the report from Centre for the Study of Living Standards, ...

> ... we consider low-wage jobs by educational attainment:
> - Every educational attainment category saw an increase in its incidence of low wages over the 1997-2014 period. [....]
> - At first glance, it might seem odd that every category of educational attainment saw an increase in its incidence of low wages over this period, while the incidence of low wages at the aggregate level declined. This observation can be explained by the compositional shift in the population away from lower levels of educational attainment toward higher levels of educational attainment. In particular, the share of employees aged 20 to 64
years with a university degree increased from 19.2 per cent in 1997 to 28.7 per cent in 2014.
> - The low-wage gap for all categories of educational attainment was extremely similar. In 2014, the lowest low-wage gap was 19.8 per cent for employees with post-secondary certificates or diplomas, while the highest low-wage gap was 23.2 per cent for employees with 0 to 8 years of schooling. Between 1997 and 2014, all levels of educational attainment, except the Master’s or Doctorate level, saw their low-wage gaps decline.
> Obviously, higher levels of educational attainment lead to lower low-wage job intensities. However, these results show that, over the 1997-2014 period, at every level of educational attainment, there was a general increase in the incidence of low-wage jobs, although this increase was offset by slight decreases in the low-wage gap for most levels of educational attainment. In a recent New York Times article, it was suggested that the American economy is not producing enough jobs that require college degrees. These observations may also explain why there has been an increase in the incidence of low wages in Canada, even at higher levels of educational attainment.

"Trends in Low-Wage Employment in Canada: Incidence, Gap and Intensity, 1997-2014" | Jasmin Thomas | July 2016 | Center for the Study of Living Standards, Research Report 2016-10 at http://www.csls.ca/reports/csls2016-10.pdf

Here's the cited U.S. article:

> It is true that as a group college graduates make more than high school graduates. This gap is one reason that politicians like Mr. Obama, Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump want to make college more affordable. [....]

> The problem is that the economy does not produce enough jobs that require college degrees. Private-sector white-collar jobs can increasingly be moved offshore and automated, while public-sector jobs that require degrees, notably teaching, have been decimated by deep layoffs and feeble hiring. Business investment and consumer spending have suffered in the busts of recent decades, and government spending has not picked up the slack, leading to chronic shortfalls in demand for goods, services and employees. One sign of the downshift is that much of the recent job growth has been in lower-paying occupations. Worse, there is little evidence of a turnaround. In the past five years, postings for jobs that do not require a college degree have steadily outpaced postings for those that do.

> The result is lower-quality jobs and lower pay for college graduates.

"The Broken Bargain With College Graduates" | Editorial Board, Sunday Review | May 21, 2016 | New York Times at http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/22/opinion/sunday/the-broken-bargain-with-college-graduates.html
A new study by the Centre for the Study of Living Standards shows that the percentage of low-wage earners grew across all levels of education but increased at a higher rate among the most educated
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Lezlie Kinyon's profile photoMic Norton's profile photo
2 comments
 
Okay, I'm not a PhD but belong to this community so....
High wage jobs are "badass" in colloquial terminology, however aren't usually being handed out to many other people besides "financial sector" people, and I can tell you from a working-class standpoint those salaries for "finance" are CRIMINAL. Working-class people see this as the "reward" for butt-kissing the"system"--the corporatocracy. I realize that this language may appear "revolutionary" or something, but really, what good is a viewpoint in systems business without checking out the ENTIRE system, including the part that actually DOES the work?
But we have to figure that in too, don't we-- "post-industrial economy", that strange existential state of living off COUNTING EACH OTHERS MONEY, with assembly and production etc being done in China, right?
So-- what was the question you REALLY asked, then-- is this business model ultimately stable, or...?
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David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
Does policy, says @timoreilly with @amcafee, protect the future from the past, or the past from the future?

> Policy makers need to focus on protecting the future from the past, rather than protecting the past from the future.
> Most of the policy that we see is oriented towards protecting incumbents, because of course they have the loudest voices …
> … and the biggest chequebooks.

Digest of audio recording of +Tim O'Reilly interviewed by +Andrew McAfee, “Creating More Value Than You Capture” | March 13, 2015 | SXSW Interactive at https://daviding.wordpress.com/2016/07/02/20120313-tim-oreilly-interviewed-by-andrew-mcafee-creating-more-value-than-your-capture-sxsw-interactive/
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Edmond Ramly

Discussion  - 
 
How do values play out in your systems work/research, and what might be your working definition of values?
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Edmond Ramly's profile photoDavid Ing's profile photo
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+Edmond Ramly Within the systems literature, the ideas of values have been brought up by Ackoff, who write about ideals, with the pursuit of the true (science), the good (ethics and morality), the beautiful (aesthetics) and plenty (economics). This was published in On Purposeful Systems in 1973, see https://books.google.com/books?id=R-RSHfnS7VcC&pg=PA243 .

In a slightly different view, science is generally associated with episteme (a pursuit of analytical scientific knowledge), could include techne (a pursuit of technical knowledge that can embodied in groups), and generally forgets about phronesis (a pursuit of practical ethics). I've described these as (i) know why; (ii) know how: and (iii) know when, know where, know whom). http://coevolving.com/commons/201310-rethinking-systems-thinking

However, there's a question about what we could do with those values. Sir Geoffrey Vickers was working in policy. His concerns were on reality judgements (e.g. what is really happening), value judgements (e.g. what should we do about that), and instrumental judgements (e.g. what can we do about that). The tie into Soft Systems Methodology by Checkland reflects that people aren't always rational, nor are they articulate. Drawing rich pictures in a group helps people to surface ideas and relations in interactions that they might not otherwise expose.

So, in your discussion with your colleague, there's a split in philosophy. One side thinks that values are more objective, and thus if we apply more reason, we'll get better outcomes. The other side sees that values as subjective, and thus doesn't try to fully articulate them, instead preferring to expand the size of the involved group in participation. The former would tend towards greater expertise, the latter orients towards wisdom of crowds. The former may be more oriented towards value, and the latter more towards values.
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David Ing
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Forward-looking ecology takes @LongNow present, says @FreshwaterSteve, into cross-scale interactions.

> The phrase ‘‘long now’’ expresses the history dependence of the current state of ecosystems, and the impact of current ecological processes and human action on future ecosystems.
> Stewart Brand (1999), in The Clock of the Long Now, asks, ‘‘How do we make long-term thinking automatic and common instead of difficult and rare? How do we make the taking of long-term responsibility inevitable?’’ Long-term perspectives are important in ecology, and ecology can contribute to environmental problem
solving by helping to advance long-term thinking.
> Why a forward-looking ecology? There are important, fundamental, scientific opportunities in research about the future of ecological systems. When we take forecasting seriously, we look for connections between slow and fast processes, or between rare events and ecological transformations. Such connections are fun-
damental for understanding ecological systems. They lead to multicausal, integrative explanations.

The ideas of "sharing layers" or "pacing layers" from +Stewart Brand +Long Now Foundation  can be tied to hierarchical organization in the work of Timothy F.H. Allen, which is a foundation panarchy ideas in resilence science.

Stephen R. Carpenter, "Ecological Futures: Building an Ecology of the Long Now" (Robert H. MacArthur Award Lecture) | 2002 | Ecology at https://scholar.google.ca/scholar?cluster=2691735037112411057
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David Ing
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Students of systems thinking @VSB_EMBA_Alumni and family honor @Gharajedaghi in 12-minute video for conference on Systems Thinking and Transformational Leadership on June 10, 2016.

"The Legacy of Systems Thinking" (featuring +jamshid gharajedaghi) | Jason Hall | June 2016 at https://vimeo.com/169863045 via +John Pourdehnad

"EMBA 11th Annual Conference: Systems Thinking and Transformational Leadership" | June 10, 2016 at http://alumni.villanova.edu/s/1695/alumni/index.aspx?sid=1695&gid=2&pgid=1504

I hadn't appreciated that the Villanova EMBA had become centered on systems thinking, https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/business/graduate/mba/execmba/curriculum.html .

The beginning of systems thinking at Villanova U. was in 1999 with "Russell L. Ackoff and the Advent of Systems Thinking: A Conference to Celebrate the Work of Russell L. Ackoff on his 80th Birthday and the Development of Systems Theory and Practice", with proceedings at http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.24.358 . This is where I first remember meeting +David Hawk.

Some papers from the conference were more formally edited by +Kent Myers and Margaret M. Nicholson in Systems Practice and Action Research v12 n4 1999 at http://link.springer.com/journal/11213/12/4 .

This was as I was entering the systems community, contributing "Studying the Sense & Respond Model for Designing Adaptive Enterprises, and the Influence of Russell Ackoff's System of Thinking" at http://systemicbusiness.org/pubs/1999_Villanova_Ackoff_80th_Ing_Sense_Respond_Influence.html .

With Russell Ackoff retiring from University of Pennsylvania, part of the knowledge went with Jamshid Gharajedaghi to Villanova University, with the last vestiges of the Social Systems Science program going to the Ackoff Collaboratory for Advancement of the Systems Approach http://www.acasa.upenn.edu/history.htm .

Jamshid was a featured speaker on the last day of the ISSS 1999 Asilomar meeting, on "Iterative Design: the Third Generation of Systems Thinking" at http://www.isss.org/1999meet/plenary.htm
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David Ing
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As alternative to embodied energy in the environment, Gregory Bateson's view of a difference that makes a difference in a coevolutionary ecosystem has a relational triad of (i) circular causation at several levels including morphogenesis; (ii) co-learning in adaptation, including between animals and their environment; and (iii) genetics, a memory system at a slower pace.

New book by anthropologist emeritus Peter-Harries Jones includes excerpts from unpublished Bateson archives.

> According to an unpublished manuscript of his entitled “The Evolutionary Idea,” Bateson’s discussion of coevolution was to have included a lengthy commentary on appropriate syntax.” As we have seen, the "syntax" of the dominant view in biology weds its conception of embodied energy in the environment to a “field” of complex physical resources, biomass, and bioenergy. whose operations functionally interact to provide physical necessities of life. On the other hand, which difference makes a difference in any ecosystem is “a threesome business," he wrote, and is a relational triad, The first term of the triad is circular causation at several levels, which must therefore include morphogenesis, the generation of form per se, The second term is that of co-learning in adaptation, which would include co-learning between animals and their environments. The third term is that of genetlcs, which is a memory system, and a much slower temporal variable than the other two. Each draws upon the other recursively as relations of the other. Bateson goes on to argue that the study of coevolution is a means for unearthing all the processes we call “knowing,” and that evolutionary theory, will consist of subject-predicate sentences in which the subject will always be a relationship and not an object (Bk. Mss.. Box 5,1987, 205.27). [p. 169]

"Upside-Down Gods: Gregory Bateson's World of Difference" | Peter Harries-Jones | 2016 | Fordham U. Press / Oxford U. Press at https://books.google.com/books?id=aPomDAAAQBAJ

I was searching on morphogenesis related to Christopher Alexander's Nature of Order book 2 "The Process of Creating Life", which is oriented more towards geometrics.

John Brockman wrote that "The Evolutionary Idea" got published as "Mind and Nature", but perhaps the content of the above draft didn't come out that way. http://www.heartoftheart.org/?p=3460
books.google.ca - Science's conventional understanding of environment as an inert material resource underlies our unwillingness to acknowledge the military-industrial role in ...
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Parts of "The Evolutionary Idea" made it to the second half of "Mind and Nature", the first half coming from another abandoned book which was to be called "Every Schoolboy Knows". All this is mentioned in the introduction to "Mind and Nature" the first couple of chapters of which is available (with a few typos) here
http://www.oikos.org/mind&nature.htm
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