A global community interested in systems science(s). Includes members of the International Society for the Systems Sciences.
See all
Members (242)

Stream

David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
Diagramming systems? OPM can be used for systems biology, as well as systems engineering.  Object-Oriented modelling and SysML have deficiencies overcome in Object Process Methodology ontology.  Peer-reviewed article by +Dov Dori and Mordechai Choder in 2007.  

> In general, the current Object-Oriented approach to modeling and developing software systems is not suitable for representing effectively biological concepts, because, as argued, it cannot model concurrently in a single type of diagram both the objects, e.g., a protein, and the processes, e.g., transcription, that transform (create, consume, or change the state of) these objects. UML 2.0 [16], for example, includes 13 different types of models, each with its own diagram type, separate set of symbols and concepts. Moreover, the lack of the process as a stand-alone concept in the OO modeling approach is a major hindrance for modeling biological systems, which are mostly process-intensive. Finally, many software engineers find it difficult to master the UML modeling framework, making it unrealistic to expect biologists to employ it in a valuable way to model biological systems.  [....]  

> The recent Systems Modeling Language, SysML [23] initiative offers no solutions to the problems of current OO approaches to modeling, as it is based on UML and therefore suffers from most of UML's deficiencies, namely multiple diagram types and segregation between structure and behavior.  [....]  

> Object-Process Methodology, OPM [30] is a holistic approach to the study and development of complex systems that caters to human intuition while maintaining a formal framework. The living cell is a prime example of a highly complex system, in which the two main system aspects—structure and behavior—are highly intertwined and hard to separate. Motivated by the requirement of a single model to represent these two major system aspects, OPM is founded upon two elementary building blocks—objects and processes—which represent concurrently the system's structure, i.e., the objects, or components, that comprise the system, and behavior, i.e., the processes that transform the system's objects by creating them, consuming them, or changing their states, in a balanced way without highlighting one at the expense of the other.  

"Conceptual Modeling in Systems Biology Fosters Empirical Findings: The mRNA Lifecycle" | Dov Dori,  Mordechai Choder | 2007 | PLOS One at http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0000872
1
Add a comment...

David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
Donald Schon described The Loss of the Stable State in 1970 on the BBC in the first of 6 Reith lectures:  

> Belief in the stable state serves primarily to protect us from apprehension of the threats inherent in change. Belief in stability is a means of maintaining stability, or at any rate the illusion of stability. But the most threatening situations are those that confront us with uncertainty, and by ‘uncertainty’, I don’t mean risk, which is a probability ratio which we all know how to handle, particularly those who are managers of industry. We can deal with risk. Uncertainty is the situation of more information than we can handle.  [....]  

The first lecture is downloadable as audio "Donald Schön: Change and Industrial Society #1" | BBC Reith Lecture (1970) | https://soundcloud.com/bbcreithlectures/rla-donald-sch-n-change-and .

Transcripts of all six lectures is "Reith Lectures Transcripts" | 1970 to 1979 | at http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/features/the-reith-lectures/transcripts/1970/  

This recordings of six lectures is listed, but only the first is available at http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00h3xfh/episodes/guide 
BBC Reith Lectures
RLA: Donald Schön: Change and Industrial Society 1 1970
3
Add a comment...
 
"Understanding disease through systems thinking" at #incoseIS by Gary Robert Smith on cancer and inflammation, based on work with Open U.  Article published as:  "Angiotensin and Systems Thinking: Wrapping Your Mind Around the Big Picture" | The Ochsner Journal | Spring 2013 at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3603174/
2
Add a comment...

David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
The prosocial lie to neighbours for their benefit; the antisocial lie to neighbours for their own interests.  +Gerardo Iniguez Gonzalez (Aalto U.) and Robin Dunbar (Oxford) found:

> certain kinds of fibs—so-called white lies– are actually quite acceptable, even necessary at times.  [....]  ... we all benefit from lying in some way. But how?  

Today, we get an answer thanks to the work of Gerardo Iñiguez at Aalto University in Finland and a few pals (including Robin Dunbar, an anthropologist from the University of Oxford of Dunbar’s number fame). These guys have simulated the effect that lies have on the strength of connections that exist within a social network.  

But they’ve added fascinating twist. These guys have made a clear distinction between lies that benefit the person being lied to versus lies that benefit the person doing the lying. In other words, their model captures the difference between “white” lies, which are prosocial, and “black” lies, which are antisocial.  [....]  

When exchanging information about opinions, individuals can hide their true opinion by lying about it to their neighbors. So their public opinion differs from their private one.  

Iñiguez consider this act of lying to be antisocial when it tends to increase the difference in opinion between two individuals and so weakens their ties. But the team considers this act to be prosocial, a white lie, when it tends to reduce the difference in opinion between two individuals and so strengthens their ties.  

"Simulations Reveal How White Lies Glue Society Together and Black Lies Create Diversity" | June 12, 2014 | MIT Technology Review at http://www.technologyreview.com/view/528326/simulations-reveal-how-white-lies-glue-society-together-and-black-lies-create-diversity 

Original publication at "Effects of Deception in Social Networks" | Gerardo Iñiguez, Tzipe Govezensky, Robin Dunbar, Kimmo Kaski, Rafael A. Barrio | June 3, 2014 | arXiv:1406.0673 [physics.soc-ph] at http://arxiv.org/abs/1406.0673 
Evolutionary biologists have long thought that lying ought to destroy societies. Now computational anthropologists have shown that nothing could be further from the truth.
3
Add a comment...

David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
Lecture on "The Systems View of Life" by Fritjof Capra is simultaneously both clear and deep.  Worthwhile both for those immersed in and new to systems thinking.  
http://daviding.wordpress.com/2014/06/17/the-systems-view-of-life-web-video-fritjof-capra-schumacher-college-may-7-2014/
2
Add a comment...
 
A resource of gurdjieffian materials for those interested in the systemic thought. The Romanian physicist Basarab Nicolescu has explained the connections in the paper GURDJIEFF AND SYSTEMIC THOUGHT, written as the chapter on Gurdjieff for the “Encyclopedie des Sciences Esoterique”.
1
Hassan Ahmed's profile photoAdrian Mirel Petrariu's profile photo
5 comments
 
Thank you for your most prompt reply, kind attention to my request. I would love to have this material indeed. My email is: hrafat@gmail.com. Thank you
Add a comment...

David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
How many bugs are in your model? +Steve Easterbook says climate change models have a lower density of defects than commercial software, but more than mission-critical space shuttle programming.

Computing the Climate (web video) | Steve Easterbrook | March 1 2014 | TEDxUofT 2014 at TEDxUofT 2014: Computing the Climate 

TEDx talk: Should we trust climate models? | Steve Easterbrook | May 23, 2014 | Serendipity at http://www.easterbrook.ca/steve/2014/05/tedx-talk-should-we-trust-climate-models/ 
1
Add a comment...
3
Adrian Mirel Petrariu's profile photo
5 comments
 
"According to real, exact knowledge one force, or two forces, can never produce a phenomenon. The presence of a third force is necessary, for it is only with the help of the a third force that the first two can produce what may be called a phenomenon, no matter in what sphere.
"The teaching of the three forces is at the root of all ancient systems. The first force may be called active or positive; the second, passive or negative; the third, neutralizing. But these are merely names, for in reality all three forces are equally active and appear as active, passive, and neutralizing only at their meeting points, that is to say, only in relation to one another at a given moment." (G.I. Gurdjieff quoted in P.D. Ouspensky, In Search of the Miraculous, pg. 75)
Add a comment...

David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
Open source hardware designs for industrial machines "to build a small, sustainable civilization with modern comforts" are documented in the "Global Village Construction Set", led by +Marcin Jakubowski at the Factor-E Farm in Missouri.  The first machine was the "Compressed Earth Brick Press" built in 2007.  Presentation have been given at TED talks, and makers' faires.  
http://opensourceecology.org/wiki/RCCS
1
Add a comment...

James F. Moore

Discussion  - 
 
Here is a peek at my research on the smartphone business ecosystem developing its massive scale organizational capabilities over a fifteen-year period, to the point that it is a leading front of computing and worldwide communications today.  I'm interested in hearing from systems sciences folks who are curious about and/or studying business ecosystems as systems, including cognitive as well as economic and technical systems.  Thanks very much!  Jim Moore
3
Mushin MW's profile photoChris Whitside's profile photo
2 comments
 
Very helpful for understanding the emergence of a new market and ecosystem. Thanks James. I could fill a page to the left of yours with a designed ecosystem for enterprise mobility that, for most, is apparently still too far over the horizon. The proponent has been promoting it to industry (users) for years but all he gets are glazed eyes. I think the project's best hope is to be championed by a systems thinking design team who can help package the required learning for the marketing effort. Without a compelling learning hub, trying to get a disparate community of end users to collaborate on building a new market is like herding cats. 
Add a comment...

Mark Pharoah

Discussion  - 
 
Alicia Juarrero considers how systems dynamics create mental characteristics in her brilliant book "Dynamics in Action". In this post, I assess her call for a hermeneutic approach by considering the relevant dynamic relationships that determine the identity of wholes.
Section 1 of 4 - Ali the particle physicist: “covering-laws” and the hermeneutic approach Consider Ali, the particle physicist. Unlike a physicist in the real world, he has no concept of the contained entity we call “the atom”. Imagine that Ali has identified and interpreted the dynamic
2
1
José Manuel Sánchez Durón's profile photoGeoff McDonnell's profile photoJose A Munoz Mata's profile photo
3 comments
 
Nice summary +Geoff McDonnell. 
Add a comment...

About this community

The International Society for the Systems Sciences (ISSS) is among the first and oldest organizations devoted to interdisciplinary inquiry into the nature of complex systems, and remains perhaps the most broadly inclusive. Originally founded as the Society for General Systems Research, the initial purpose of the society was "to encourage the development of theoretical systems which are applicable to more than one of the traditional departments of knowledge," with the following principal aims: to investigate the isomorphy of concepts, laws, and models in various fields, and to help in useful transfers from one field to another; to encourage the development of adequate theoretical models in areas which lack them; to eliminate the duplication of theoretical efforts in different fields; and to promote the unity of science through improving the communication among specialists. In the intervening years, the ISSS has expanded its scope beyond purely theoretical and technical considerations to include the practical application of systems methodologies to problem solving. Even more importantly, it has provided a forum where scholars and practitioners from across the disciplinary spectrum, representing academic, business, government, and non-profit communities, can come together to share ideas and learn from one another.

David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
Feeding grain to pigs and chickens, says @JoelSalatin, is ecologically wasteful. On homesteads, pigs foraged and chickens ate kitchen scraps. Herbivore-based cultures relied on nature rather than performing the work of tillage.  
http://daviding.wordpress.com/2014/07/11/earth-week-lecture-joel-salatin-april-27-2012-colorado-college/
1
Add a comment...

David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
W. Edwards Deming (quality guru), Russell Ackoff (systems thinker) and David P. Langford (education quality) describe why input-process-out isn't the complete perspective for education (and other service systems).  

> "It's possible to improve the performance of each part taken separately, and destroy the system at the same time".  [Ackoff, at around 1:40]  

"A Theory of a System for Education and Managers" | W. Edwards Deming, Russell Ackoff, David P. Langford | The Deming Library, Volume XXI | CC-M (Clair Crawford-Mason Productions 1998 at A Theory of a System for Educators and Managers  

via "The Education System" | +John Hunter | June 8, 2014 |  Curious Cat Management Improvement Blog  at http://management.curiouscatblog.net/2014/06/08/the-education-system .  
> We need to inspire life long learners for the rapidly changing and knowledge intensive future (and really we already in that future today). Teachers and school systems applying David Langford’s ideas are doing this. Not just talking about it, but creating systems that have as an outcome students that seek to learn.
7
2
Jorge Ochoa-Lions's profile photoB. F. Hayerizadeh's profile photo
Add a comment...
 
The less selective the ties on social media, the more generic the content becomes.  
> Mikolaj Jan Piskorski ... a professor at Harvard Business School ... analyzed many datasets from many companies, Facebook included. The big insight he takes from looking at Facebook's data is that, the more friends a user has, the less active he or she is. As people amass friends, the type of content they post becomes more generic, less personal (which explains Facebook's sudden embrace of news media). 
"Understanding Facebook's Lost Generation of Teens" | Ryan Bradley | June 16, 2014 | Fast Company at http://www.fastcompany.com/3031259/these-kids-today
The social network's struggle to woo kids isn't because it's also their parents' favorite social network.
1
Add a comment...

David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
People from rice-growing China are more interdependent than wheat-growing northern regions, says Thomas Thalheim, U. Virginia.  

> Talhelm and his co-authors at universities in China and Michigan propose that the methods of cooperative rice farming -- common to southern China for generations -- make the culture in that region interdependent, while people in the wheat-growing north are more individualistic, a reflection of the independent form of farming practiced there over hundreds of years.  

> "The data suggests that legacies of farming are continuing to affect people in the modern world," Talhelm said. "It has resulted in two distinct cultural psychologies that mirror the differences between East Asia and the West."  

> According to Talhelm, Chinese people have long been aware of cultural differences between the north region and the southern, which are divided by the Yangtze River -- the largest river in China, flowing west to east across the vast country. People in the north are thought to be more aggressive and independent, while people to the south are considered more cooperative and interdependent.  

> "This has sometimes been attributed to different climates -- warmer in the south, colder in the north -- which certainly affects agriculture, but it appears to be more related to what Chinese people have been growing for thousands of years," Talhelm said.  

> He notes that rice farming is extremely labor-intensive, requiring about twice the number of hours from planting to harvest as does wheat. And because most rice is grown on irrigated land, requiring the sharing of water and the building of dikes and canals that constantly require maintenance, rice farmers must work together to develop and maintain an infrastructure upon which all depend. This, Talhelm argues, has led to the interdependent culture in the southern region.
Wheat, on the other hand, is grown on dry land, relying on rain for moisture. Farmers are able to depend more on themselves, leading to more of an independent mindset that permeates northern Chinese culture.

"'Rice theory' explains north-south China cultural differences" | May 8, 2014 | Science Daily at http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140508141743.htm

Original research by T. Talhelm, X. Zhang, S. Oishi, C. Shimin, D. Duan, X. Lan, S. Kitayama | Large-Scale Psychological Differences Within China Explained by Rice Versus Wheat Agriculture | May 2014 | Science at http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1246850 
via +David Hawk 
A new cultural psychology study has found that psychological differences between the people of northern and southern China mirror the differences between community-oriented East Asia and the more individualistic Western world -- and the differences seem to have come about because southern China has grown rice for thousands of years, whereas the north has grown wheat.
2
Jose A Munoz Mata's profile photo
 
Very interesting reading and study
Add a comment...

David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
Voters can chose "none of the above" by declining a ballot in Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan or Alberta, so that it is recognized in a separate category.  This is not true for federal elections in Canada.  
> The deputy returning officer at your poll hands you your ballot and you hand it back. You can, if you wish, say “I decline” while doing this, but there is no requirement for any declaration, oral or written, under the Ontario Election Act. The DRO will write “declined” on the ballot, preserve it for the returning officer and note in the poll record that the elector — you — declined to vote.  

"How to vote for ‘none of the above’ — without spoiling your ballot" | Robert Bostelaar | June 11, 2014 | National Post at http://news.nationalpost.com/2014/06/11/ontario-election-2014-how-to-vote-for-none-of-the-above-without-spoiling-your-ballot/ .

Encouragement to Decline Your Vote is prescribed at http://www.declineyourvote.ca/ .  

>From the Ontario Elections Act:   
DECLINED BALLOT
53.  An elector who has received a ballot and returns it to the deputy returning officer declining to vote, forfeits the right to vote and the deputy returning officer shall immediately write the word “declined” upon the back of the ballot and preserve it to be returned to the returning officer and shall cause an entry to be made in the poll record that the elector declined to vote. R.S.O. 1990, c. E.6, s. 53.
> Instead of not voting at all or spoiling your ballot, consider Declining your vote. 
See http://www.declineyourvote.ca/ .

More background is available as "The 'Decline Your Vote' Campaign is Probably Not an Evil Conservative Conspiracy" | Patrick McGuire | June 11, 2014 | Vice at http://www.vice.com/en_ca/read/the-decline-your-vote-campaign-is-probably-not-an-evil-conservative-conspiracy 
There is a way to get your 'none of the above' choice recognized. Not by spoiling your ballot, but by following Ontario’s formal procedure for declining to vote
1
David Ing's profile photo
 
Besides declining a ballot, there was also an alternative with the "None of the Above" party at http://nota.ca/ .  

In election results, the party reported:  
> None of the Above Party of Ontario gets 21% of all new votes for smaller parties and Independents across Ontario's 107 ridings - in just 8 ridings and 13% in just 4 Mississauga ridings.  

See https://www.facebook.com/pages/None-of-the-Above-Party-of-Ontario/468514456613813 .

Maybe +David Hawk could start a national party across the U.S.
Add a comment...

David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
Scrum 1993 predates the Agile Manifesto 2001, says +James Coplien, from the 1984 Takeuchi and Nonaka HBR article on practices at Honda, Canon and NEC, that evolved to become known as The Toyota Way and then Lean Thinking by the +Lean Enterprise Institute .
http://daviding.wordpress.com/2014/05/14/why-architecture-is-needed-even-in-agile-mp3-audio-jim-coplien-january-2011-business901/ via +Joe Dager 
Scrum came out of lean and predates agile, says @jcoplien. [29:30] Everyone thinks that Scrum came out of Agile. Now wait a minute, let's stop this for a second, because Scrum has been around since...
2
Add a comment...

David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
Characteristics of Open Systems Theory by Katz & Kahn (1978) in lecture (at 10:30) starts with experiment demonstration of comfortable interaction distances at (0:00) and Seinfeld close talkers (at 5:10).  

Daniel Stokols | Principles of Systems Theory, Physiological and Psychological Stress | August 2012 | U.C. Irvine at http://youtu.be/C1WARF3V5wU?t=10m30s

Class on Environmental Psychology described at https://eee.uci.edu/12s/54195/
5
Mushin MW's profile photo
 
Thank You David very good presentation especially the introduction of Selye's observations (1975) in regards to stressors.  In stress research in 1984 we observer "overload at work" as the number one stressor in all populations.  

The breakdown is work in modernity has become more demanding with increasing productivity in skillfulness as a specialist inside of corporations who are profit driven disregarding people.  The air traffic controller and the doctors making mistakes under the pressure to perform more complexity than is humanly possible.  

MIT Rebecca Henderson's "How to get Unstuck" is worth watching because she speaks directly to the overload issue in organizational living.  If I remember correctly only 3% of management know how to communicate with employees.  And the current stress level in knowledge workers is 250% to 500% over normal.  Knowledge workers are now facing mandates changing moment to moment in corporate crises where they are in a constant fire drill.  

We know stress causes malfunctioning in ecological systems and decreases intuitive creative solution making activities with eustress to successfully manage the fight and flight automatic response in our biology.  Distress is moods happening in the conversations within the body/mind/environment = anxiety, fear, confusion, distrust, resentments, disappointments, resignation and despair that are causing  the healthcare crises of disease, health problems and increase death.  

In 1984, heart attacks were the major cause of death and they occurred on Monday morning when one returned to work after relaxing.  And 7% of the population had suicidal ideations in the previous seven days. Today we treat cardiac arrest with medications and suicide is skyrocketing and happening on Wednesday when the coping skills hit the mid-week hump burned out and there is no way in the mood of despair in the calamity happening to make to Friday's Happy Hour.  

Take this factual conversation I had in the last two weeks: a Viet Nam Vet became a professional union camera man for NBC.  He shared that in the 1970's when he was involved in media he was paid well and considered a professional with respect. When he went on a shoot there was an entire crew: camera, light, sound and director etc.  The corporate productivity gains through technological advances and learning has produced a situation today where he performs all those skills single handily, and his wages are stuck in 1970's.  As an NBC camera man he has not benefited from the productive gains of the NBC corporation, and instead as the union shop steward is constantly fighting with the new and improved NBC corporation claiming that him and his union are longer even relevant, and are intentional and deliberately out to destroy his position.

I submit these language patterns in organizational and institutional discourses are driven in roles, standards and practices of a marketplace claiming human to be obedient and negate their own self managing capabilities.  These architectual structures, we create, are designed to be emotional contradictions to anyone having a locus of control in creating a free independent identity, and are reinforcing the negative effects of entropy in debilitating systemic double binds in the ecological environment of organization living everywhere.  

So finally the art of achieving equilibrium with increasing institutional overload or overstimulation (a physical, psychological, environmental noise/demand/condition beyond the locus of one's power to control) is unsustainable and causes death.  Or in the American lexicon we call it simply BULLSH$T.  I assert that the universal business code, we created, is now totally out of control and the environmental stressors being created produce suicide as the only way for a host to survive.  And as your friend David Hawk recently said "I am not against suicide, I just wish the people in power would commit suicide, rather than the sensitive ones who care."
Add a comment...

David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
Public Sector Mutuals are worker-owned spinouts of services in the UK. +Francis Maude spoke of 5 principles for public sector reform: 

> The first of those principles is openness, because transparency sharpens accountability, improves choice for the public, and it raises standards. [....]  

> Second, digital by default. If a service can be delivered online, then it should only be delivered online [....]

> Third, a properly innovative culture, so public servants have permission to try sensible new ideas, moving away from the risk aversion that has tended to hold back progress.  

> Fourth, tight control from the centre over common activities – like property, IT and procurement – because it reduces costs and encourages collaborative working. [....]  

> The fifth principle is loose control over operations, which is where employee ownership steps in. The people who know best how to deliver public services best aren’t the politicians in Westminster or the bureaucrats in Whitehall and in town halls, but the professionals working on the frontline. Tight control over the centre must be matched by much looser control over operations.  

The approach described by Maude was bottom-up, with encouragement:  

> The last government started down the path of mutualisation. But their approach was in my view and that of others, too top-down, too prescriptive and bureaucratic; and resulted in no more than a handful of new mutuals.

> I decided against this approach. [...]  We didn’t start with the theory and move on to the practice. We did it the other way round. We decided we’d find a hundred flowers and build a hothouse around them so they can bloom and grow.  

> So the first thing was to identify groups of workers who wanted to spin out from the public sector. [....] 

> Next, we made £10 million available through our Mutual Support Programme. [....]  

> And there’s no “one size fits all” approach, no one size fits all format. Some mutuals are conventional companies; some are companies limited by guarantee; some are community interest companies; some choose to be charities. Some have 100% employee ownership; but to qualify there must be no less than 25% employee ownership so that staff can exercise at least negative control over the entity. [....]  

"Oakeshott Memorial Lecture 2014" | The Rt Hon Francis Maude MP | March 24, 2014 | UK Cabinet Office at https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/francis-maude-oakeshott-memorial-lecture-2014 

Mutuals Information Service at http://mutuals.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/ 

Oakeshott lecture coverage liveblogging at https://storify.com/cabinetofficeuk/robert-oakeshott-lecture-2014 

Surfaced by +Nicholas Charney | Is Innovation in Service Delivery a Blind Spot in Canada? | April 11, 2014 | CPS Renewal at http://www.cpsrenewal.ca/2014/04/is-innovation-in-service-delivery-blind.html
2
Add a comment...

David Ing
owner

Discussion  - 
 
When and where is now done on smartphones, not by calendar appointments. In 2002, +Rich Ling and +BIRGITTE YTTRI described behaviours now commonplace as "Nobody sits at home and waits for the telephone to ring: Micro and hyper-coordination through the use of the mobile telephone".

http://ingbrief.wordpress.com/2014/04/17/nobody-sits-at-home-and-waits-for-the-telephone-to-ring-micro-and-hyper-coordination-through-the-use-of-the-mobile-telephone-rich-ling-and-birgitte-yttri-2002/ 

“Nobody sits at home and waits for the telephone to ring: Micro and hyper-coordination through the use of the mobile telephone” | Rich Ling and Birgitte Yttri  (2002) at http://www.richardling.com/papers/2002_Nobody_sits_at_home_and_waits.pdf , formally republished as Ling, R. and Yttri, B. 2002. “Hyper-coordination via mobile phones in Norway.” In Katz, J. and Aakhus, M. (eds.) Perpetual contact: Mobile communication, private talk, public performance. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
1
1
James F. Moore's profile photo
Add a comment...