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Bruno Gonçalves
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Discussion  - 
 
Some of my earliest childhood memories are of going to junk yards with my father. He worked his entire career on car and truck (the 18…
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Ian McCarthy

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Is your organization being sabotaged?
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Ian McCarthy

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Presentation slides on the open innovation research landscape. Share and use as wish.
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Ian McCarthy

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Google Scholar Metrics: Top ten most highly cited research papers in Business, Economics and Management.
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Hi everyone! We run a social science blog from the Philippines and we write and share articles on everything social science. Please show us your support by liking our FB page. (Google+ page under contemplation). Thank you!
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gene s

Discussion  - 
 
Data from the World Bank can be used to order countries by infant Mortality Rate (IMR).

There are 38 countries with IMR below 5, and 63 with IMR below 10. Of these 63, 6 are in Latin America and Caribbean, 7 are in East Asia and the Pacific, 38 are in Europe and Central Asia, 8 are in the Middle East and North Africa, 2 are in North America, and two are in South Asia.

The countries with the 15 lowest IMR are all in Europe and Central Asia, except two, Singapore and Japan, in East Asia and the Pacific. Some of the countries in Europe and Central Asia are Luxembourg, Iceland, Finland, Andorra, Norway, Slovenia, Sweden and Cyprus.

There are 5 countries with IMR higher than 80: Chad, Somalia, Sierra Leone, Central African Republic, and Angola, all in Sub-Saharan Africa.

There are another 41 countries with IMR above 40 but below 80. 29 of these countries are in Sub-Saharan Africa. Only one of these, Haiti, is in Latin America and the Caribbean, and only one, Djibouti, is in Middle East and North Africa. Two, Turkmenistan and Tajikistan, are in Europe and Central Asia. Three, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India, are in South Asia. Five are in East Asia and the Pacific.

Of the 15 countries with the highest IMR, all but two, Afghanistan and Pakistan, are in Sub-Saharan Africa.
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gene s

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This shows variation in governance in Latin America and Caribbean (LAC), again, using the World Bank data, showing effective governance. I used the same y axis as I used in the world graph, just to compare LAC to the world. In the world graph, showing the top and bottom 10, the top 10 all had scores over 1.7 and the bottom 10 all had scores below -1.4. For LAC, almost all of the scores were higher than -1.4 and lower than 1.7.

One LAC (Haiti) country was in the lowest 10. None of the LAC countries were in the highest 10.
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gene s

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This time, again looking at data from the World Bank ( http://data.worldbank.org/ ). For all countries in the world, there is a very high degree of variation within the region on secondary enrollment. 19 of the 20 lowest countries are from Sub-Saharan Africa. Pakistan is the exception. Among 20 countries with highest enrollment, 3 are from Latin America and Caribbean, 3 are from East Asia and Pacific, and the remaining 14 are from Europe and Central Asia. Several of the high enrollment countries are the usual, Netherlands, Denmark, Norway. But several are also probably less usual: Belarus and Uzbekistan. If the upper limit were expanded a little, the list would also include Kazakhstan and Saudi Arabia, and another expected country, Israel.
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Mario D'Andreta

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An overview of the literature on globalization shows the presence of four great waves of theoretical approaches to the analysis of this social phenomena (Martell 2010, Berry 2011). The first wave i…
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Ian McCarthy

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What is a creative consumer? http://wp.me/p68nVj-1j  #userinnovation
Creative consumers are defined as:”customers who adapt, modify, or transform a proprietary offering” (Berthon et al. 2007: 39) A few years back I wrote a paper with colleagues (Pierre B…
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Michael Smith

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Assessment of #Water Shortage and its Implications to #Gender Role
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This study was carried in Mvumi wards in Dodoma region, Tanzania. The study area was selected to represent semi-arid #biome as it experiences annual excessive drought.
For More: http://www.omicsonline.com/open-access/assessment-of-water-shortage-and-its-implications-to-gender-role-insemiarid-areas-in-mvumi-ward-dodoma-in-tanzania-2151-6200-1000142.php?aid=65465
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Shlomo Ben-Ami points out the climate that nurtures populism, without elaborating the political structure that allows it to thrive. The reason why "no Western democracy nowadays is immune to right-wing populism" is that the "volonté générale (general will) of the people has been hijacked by demagogues for - often - nefarious ends, which have "long bedeviled democratic politics." Right-wing populism has a history of xenophobia, which focuses on nostalgia and blame, allowing its politicians to combine it with other ideologies, such as nativism.
In Europe, the EU has become a convenient bogeyman for "everything that goes wrong" politically - democratic deficit, the inability to react to crises and to act accordingly etc. For Britain's leading Eurosceptics, like Nigel Farage, "the borderless world that the EU, with its commitment to globalization, represents is destroying the nation-state, which better protected their interests," by withdrawing from Europe. Workers resent EU immigrants' eagerness to work for lower wages and the elderly "recalled a past when jobs were secure, neighbors were familiar, and security was assured."
In America, Donald Trump has adopted a similar playbook. He has been successful in selling his slogan "America First." Yet his other campaign pledge - "Make America Great Again" - may just be snake oil. His intention to "withdraw the US from international arrangements" reveals his ignorance in US history and his inconsistency of his reasoning. On the one hand he would increase military spending, on the other, he would "dispense with NATO."
That Farage and Trump had been able to rise to prominence has much the paranoid style of politics to thank for. Populism actually constitutes the essence of democratic politics, which - per se - is good for democracy, but it is illiberalism that is the real problem. In theory populism is positive, because it brings to the fore issues that large parts of the population care about, but that the political elites neglect, or want to avoid discussing - immigration for the right or austerity for the left. But populism can also turn bad and ugly, if opportunists hijack these issues to win attention and garner popular support for personal gains. On both sides of the Atlantic populism has become an illiberal democratic response to undemocratic liberalism. Both Britain and the US have been held ransom by a bunch of bigots, who seek to impose their black and white views on a majoritarian mainstream and their uncompromising stance towards the - in their eyes undemocratic - establishment, polarising their countries.
Indeed, the Brexit vote and Trump's presidential nomination should be a wakeup call for the political establishment that only a democratic process will bring peace to a country. Ordinary citizens feel excluded if their government put independent, technocratic institutions in charge, that they think don't have their best interests at heart. But then, courts, central banks and other government organisations do require experts and specialists, which sometimes leave no space for democratic opposition. No doubt political leaders are well advised to educate their citizens and inform them of what the government does. Better understanding of politics help promote the social contract between citizens and their leaders.
It seems that practically no Western democracy nowadays is immune to right-wing populism. While populist rhetoric seems to be reaching fever pitch, with far-reaching consequences, the reality is that the strain of nativism that it represents has long bedeviled democratic politics.
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Ian McCarthy

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Follow the (Social Media) leader
The owner of a Twitter account that currently boasts nearly 24 thousand followers, Ian McCarthy gives social media praise for being an invaluable tool for disseminating his research and teaching to a wider audience. In fact, his influential content has landed his Twitter handle on lists with ...
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One of the few tedious things I enjoy: making an APA ready citation list for my books.
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Metrocosm

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Which EU country has produced the most emigrants?
Of the 28 European Union member states, which one has the largest population living outside the country? Answer: the United Kingdom Immigrants vs. expats While the U.K. votes to approve the Brexit and leave the E.U. to stop the inflow of foreign immigrants, the fact that 4.9 million of its own citizens are living in other countries goes […]
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gene s

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Data from the World Bank show that Infant Mortality Rates (IMR) have been declining steadily. In 1980, the regions were fairly far apart, with North America and Europe having the lowest IMR and Sub-Saharan Africa and Middle East and North Africa the highest. But now, in 2015, almost all the regions are much closer together, since the regions with high IMR have shown a lot of improvement. The exception is Sub-Saharan Africa, still quite a lot higher than everywhere else, but since the late 1990's, declining quite rapidly.

Recall, though, that regional analysis is just a starting place, as in other posts, I've demonstrated there is often quite a lot of variation within regions.
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gene s

Discussion  - 
 
Government Effectiveness, South East Asia
Data from the World Bank http://data.worldbank.org/ shows the variation in governance in South East Asia. There is quite a lot of variation, from a high of 2.2 in Singapore, to a low of -1.5 in Myanmar. In fact, Myanmar is among the 10 countries in the world with the lowest scores, and Singapore is the country with the highest world score.

Brief methods note. I'm not sure the World Bank defines "South East Asia" so this grouping is from the UN https://esa.un.org/unpd/wpp/DataQuery/
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gene s

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The World Bank has indicators for six dimensions of of governance, http://data.worldbank.org/data-catalog/worldwide-governance-indicators
Previously I showed that these dimensions are all fairly well intercorrelated. Here is how one of them, effective governance, varies throughout the world.

Most countries in the lowest 10 on government effectiveness are in Sub-Saharan Africa, except a couple in East Asia (North Korea, Myanmar) and in Latin America and Caribbean (Haiti). Most of the countries in the highest 10 are in Europe and East Asia, except on in North America (Canada). By the way, the US is high up too, just not the top 10.

"Government Effectiveness captures perceptions of the quality of public services, the quality of the civil service and the degree of its independence from political pressures, the quality of policy formulation and implementation, and the credibility of the government's commitment to such policies. Estimate gives the country's score on the aggregate indicator, in units of a standard normal distribution, i.e. ranging from approximately -2.5 to 2.5."
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gene s

Discussion  - 
 

Using data from the World Bank, I looked at education in different countries. Secondary Education had the least missing data. In some regions there is some but not much variation among countries in the region, while in others, there is large variation among countries in the region. Here is a website showing charts and linking to data.
Click here to go back to the reports page. Click here to go back to the World Bank page. Summary. Basically, the WB has three indicators, literacy rate, secondary enrollment and tertiary enrollment. Literacy rate has the most missing data, secondary enrollment the least.
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gene s

Discussion  - 
 
In studying global change, it is often useful to start analysis at a large level, to get some idea of where to go next. For example, I look at regional trends for infant mortality rate (IMR - number of infants dying before age 1, per 1,000 live births). There are often meaningful differences among global regions. But it is also useful to keep in mind that there can be wide variations within the regions. For example, according to data from the World Bank ( http://data.worldbank.org/ ) some countries in Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) have fairly low IMR, all below 10. On the other hand, other countries have fairly high IMR, several above 30, and Haiti, above 50. Regional variation is a good place to start, but it's just a good place to start.
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