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Now it’s not only required to publish in Journal Citation Reports indexed journals, but in the ones listed in the first 2 quartiles of its ranking, isn’t it exaggerated and unfair?
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An epidemiologist at McGill University in Montreal devised a method for tracking food choices, with data from food stores, that helps gauge family nutrition in city neighborhoods. #Science #Business
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Changing healthcare. Come to Vancouver and the Beedie School of Business at SFU to think and act entrepreneurially and turn thought and ideas into action
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CALL FOR PAPERS: 2014 PSR Special Issue "A Religious Society? Advancing the Sociology of Religion in the Philippines.

Click the link to know more!

http://thedailyopium.com/2014/02/11/call-for-papers-2014-psr-special-issue-a-religious-society-advancing-the-sociology-of-religion-in-the-philippines/
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A short video explaining the award winning article 'Social media? Get serious!'
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london 2011.... historical perspective
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ACM Web Science 2014 Conference Call for Workshops 
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Ron de Weijze

Discussion  - 
 
The mind works, when content can actively or reactively shape form, to translate it into what preceded or follows. The mind does not work, when translation does not happen, due to the inability of content to shape form or form to shape content, when sensibility or understanding get inflexible or edified.
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Just out: A video animate of the social media honeycomb framework
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Hello everybody,
Did you ever think about building your own Twitter Archive? Here is the solution! Try my new tutorial:
How to build your own Twitter Archive and Analyzing Infrastructure with MongoDB, Java and R and my easy tutorial
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About this community

Interdisciplinary community of people interested in recent developments Social Science. If you are a Sociologist, Economist, Physicist, Network, Computer or Data Scientist working on understanding human and social behavior you are in the right place.
 
Here is a post I wrote exploring the problems when people use "common sense" to refute social science evidence, rather than drawing on empirical research to analyse social issues. I use a case study of the social science of diabetes and poverty.
 
Beyond Arm Chair Social Science: Diabetes and Food Insecurity
Social science deals with social behaviour, everyday experiences, institutions and social issues that feel familiar to the public. This leaves people with the impression that they can refute empirical social science findings using their subjective world-views and personal experience. I will demonstrate the problems of this "arm chair" social science through a case study of the sociology of diabetes. 

With increased media attention on diabetes, there are many misconceptions about what causes diabetes and how this condition should be treated. With these misconceptions comes judgements about the people who get diabetes, and why this may be the case. 

On my blog, I provide an overview of the social science research on diabetes, centred on the research of epidemiologist Hilary Seligman (MD). Her team recently published a longitudinal study, finding that Americans from low socio-economic backgrounds who have diabetes are more likely than other income groups to end up visiting a hospital due to hypoglycaemia (caused when blood glucose level is too low). There is a temporal influence, which is related to the end of their pay cycle. Seligman’s team argues that food insecurity (not having access to nutritionally adequate food) is a key factor in these patterns. Simply put, economically disadvantaged people with diabetes run out of money to buy food towards the end of their pay cycle and other bills also take priority. This results in a spike of 27% of hospital visits due to hypoglycemia (http://goo.gl/fCQ1tB). 

This work was refuted by +Scientific American blogger,  +Stephen Macknik who did not draw on empirical evidence. Instead, even though he is not a social scientist, he drew on his personal experience and his subjective opinion about poverty to argue that poor people are not suffering from hypoglycaemia - even though this is what the hospital records used by Seligman's team show. Macknick says that these people are simply gorging on the "dollar menu" of fast food chains, which triggers hyperglycaemia and eventually leads to a drop in blood sugar which then results to hypoglycaemia. What evidence does he have for this? Nothing but his own experience as a relatively privileged person who also happens to suffer from diabetes. Macknick subsequently posted this critique to +Science on Google+, a large multidisciplinary Community that I help moderate (http://goo.gl/fohkIE). My blog post expands on the social science I used to refute Macknik's assertions in his post to our Community. I use this case study to make a broader point about the dangers of "arm chair" social science.

Macknick is not the only science blogger to evoke personal opinions as a form of science. Since his arguments ended up on a science forum I moderate, I have used the sociology of health to show why it's not just the public, but also scientists from other fields, who need to understand the damage that subjective ideas and "common sense" can do. Reproducing scientific fallacies and stereotypes are especially problematic for vulnerable and disadvantaged groups. Disadvantaged groups with diabetes are doubly disadvantaged due to their precarious economic position and due to their illness which is already stigmatised. 

Blogs are an informal medium for the discussion of personal opinions. But as +Michael Verona, one of our Community members pointed out, blogging for a widely-respected science publication like Scientific American lends further credibility to these opinions. This only serves to confuse the public when a scientist steps out of their area of expertise to speculate on social issues they are not trained to analyse.

Social science is not about using personal opinion. We present empirical evidence. We draw on established theories, concepts and methods to provide a broader social context to phenomena that the lay public takes for granted. In brief, below is some of the evidence I present on my blog, with a focus on the importance of social science empirical insights.

Sociology of diabetes
While diabetes has a biological component that geneticists and other sciences address, diabetes research is a multidisciplinary field. Social science research focuses on how socio-economic status and social factors impact on the spread and management of diabetes for different social groups. This is the focus of my analysis.

Social science research on diabetes has firmly established that poverty significantly impacts on the risks and management of diabetes (http://goo.gl/jXO1sd). The American Dietetic Association has identified that food insecurity is a contributing factor to diabetes (http://goo.gl/fjlWnO). Low-income people who are diabetic are more likely to experience food insecurity and as a result they are more likely to require treatment by physicians relative to people with diabetes who do not experience food insecurity (http://goo.gl/JGPZFW).  

Other studies have identified that people with diabetes experience hypoglycemic reactions as a direct outcome of not being able to afford food (http://goo.gl/ayDVce).  Food insecurity and socio-economic factors influence how people with diabetes access quality care and their "ability to adhere to recommended medication, exercise, and dietary regimens, and treatment choices" (http://goo.gl/2yDb0I). The same conclusions on food insecurity and diabetes are supported in other nations like Australia (http://goo.gl/78aeA7). 

My blog also shows that social location matters, as people living in low-income urban areas (http://goo.gl/DM1hCl) and those living in poor rural areas (http://goo.gl/I9a256) are more likely to experience food insecurity which exacerbates chronic illnesses like diabetes. These effects are compounded for racial minorities from lower socio-economic backgrounds, specifically Hispanic and Black Americans. There are further problems for women and children within these sub-groups (http://goo.gl/WOMrqk and http://goo.gl/zcTtRw).

Various comprehensive studies show that when poor people make food choices, these decisions are weighted against everyday necessities, such as paying essential bills. Their food needs and personal health comes secondary to paying the rent and key utilities like electricity (http://goo.gl/DNSg2U). The research I discuss shows clearly that poor people with diabetes are not simply making frivolous choices about eating junk food. They simply can't make ends meet. Feeding themselves unfortunately is a day-to-day survival choice. Maintaining shelter and basic utilities for their families takes precedence. This is a no-win situation resulting in a health crisis.

Sociology of health
 Sociologists see diseases like diabetes as a public health matter. This is very hard for the general public to accept because because it goes against “common sense.” For example, some may wonder: Why can't poor people simply find a way to better manage their finances? What could be more important than eating right especially when one has an illness like diabetes? Can't they just stop eating junk food and follow doctor's orders? Diabetes is linked to poor nutrition but this is not always simply about eating too much of the wrong types of food. As I've shown, diabetes can be aggravated simply because people don't have enough food to eat. 

Diabetes is linked to obesity, an idea Macknik evokes by positioning diabetes as being about “too many carbs rather than too few calories.” In my post, I use social science to establish that both diabetes and obesity are linked to poverty and food insecurity. A White, educated American man's ideas of diabetes do not speak to the full spectrum of sociological reasons explaining how and why diabetes manifests and is managed by Other groups. 

Diabetes involves self-care, which means following nutritional and lifestyle changes. Following doctors’ orders is easier when an individual does not have to cope with additional financial stress. In a society where values of individualism are the norm, health is perceived as a private matter that individuals manage alone.

Health and illness are not always just about an individual choices. While people have agency to make decisions about what’s best for them, these decisions are prioritised according to material and social constraints. In the case of poor people experiencing diabetes, their personal health sometimes has to take secondary position to their financial reality.

What looks like “common sense” from a privileged social position is not so simple from the point of view of minorities, disadvantaged, and vulnerable groups. Relying on personal experience and personal opinion as evidence against social science evidence is what I call “arm chair” social science. It is damaging to public education to perpetuate stereotypes about poor people. It distracts from addressing the social causes underlying illness.

Not all scientists are adequately qualified to speak about other sciences. As I noted last week, cultural beliefs, values and attitudes influence how the public understands science, and scientists can also fall prey to these social influences (http://goo.gl/7Rfa20).

My blopg post further explores the problems of viewing diabetes from an individual perspective and why it's important for social science discussions to be led by qualified social scientists.

Read more on my blog:  http://othersociologist.com/2014/01/26/sociology-of-diabetes/

#sociology   #socialscience   #science   #research  #DebunkingJunkScience #diabetes   #publicscience   #publichealth   #inequality   #foodinsecurity  
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We are publishing Part III of Elroy's interview with Dr. Cornelio. In this section, Dr. Cornelio discusses the Philippines as a rich venue in research for many different fields. Do you agree? Read here: http://wp.me/p3uni6-iE

"Another emerging area that I think we should venture into is urban studies, the sociology of the city. Not the sociology of the urban poor; we have that… There’s more to urban studies…disaster and risk reduction and management. Urban studies is also the critical view or critical assessment of growth of cities…Manila is a perfect laboratory for urban studies."
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Beedie social media research scores twice in ScienceDirect’s Top 25 Hottest Articles
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Ron de Weijze

Discussion  - 
 
Metaphysics is the word for what lies beyond physics. This could easily be what the exact sciences have not discovered yet or only have recently discovered, like water on other planets. There must be phenomena waiting to be discovered that will baffle our minds and change our world and our happiness forever. However, this literal interpretation of the word meta-physics is NOT how the word is used. Instead, it is used to refer to a world that is a cultural artifact, that does not like to be tested, that says "too bad for the facts" (Hegel) when theory doesn't fit the facts. It does not believe that truth exists, or God, or self or reality. Yet it claims to be metaphysical. How wrong can we be and what does it take to reset ourselves?
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economic SCIENCE??
waiting for a historical and a cultural turn in economics...
(=waiting for godot?)
 zeit,       dass dieser blog             ein bisschen politischer wird.                              und                           etwas mehr brain food produziert. der anlass: dieser kurze post zu den wirtschaftswissenschaf...
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Researchers at University of Maryland and American University identified interpersonal network interactions that spread antibiotic resistant infections in a hospital. ... http://bit.ly/Hb68QN #Science #Business
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