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Markus Wagner

Settings, Worlds, Rules  - 
 
This is my take on stress and consequences for Fate, Blood & Seven Sins. I am going to replace both by conditions.
I feel that I need to address stress and consequences first, before going into other parts of the system. How you get stress and consequences informs a lot of design decisions around conflicts, and probably also stunts (i.e. ...
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Josh Pearce

Samples, Examples & Actual Play  - 
 
Part two of Srady's Penny continued from the cliffhanger of the last session: the Keepers faced a trio of Bounty Hunters, hired to take Ash alive.  Continuing their hunt for the lost relic known as Srady's Penny,this session would see them dive deep into the ancient ruins of a lost Ursyklon city. #Crux #Fatecore #sessionreport
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Malachi Thomas

Settings, Worlds, Rules  - 
 
Players made it to the climatic battle with the BBEG (a powerful spirit of dreams on his home turf) and while they enjoyed it for the most part, they and I agree that it could have been much more epic in scope.

I know I could have added more area hazards with the highly morphic landscape, but even so, with the BBEG getting one turn to their 4 turns, we all couldn't help but feel that it was incredibly one-sided, even with his higher stats.

Luckily, I get a chance to redeem myself since the PCs think they've won, but they still haven't left the dream world...

How do you make final battles epic and memorable?
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Joshua O'Kelley's profile photoJohn Fiore's profile photo
7 comments
 
An example from the big finale of my last Tianxia scenario:
On a boat that is on fire on the Silk River, the PCs had to
>stop the master Lin Kuei assassin (skills-wise, a superior adversary) from killing the Imperial Cousin who is hidden on the boat, and
>find/save the Imperial Cousin before he succumbs to poison from a previous assassination attempt or is found by the Lin Kuei assassin or drowns because
>while the assassin's allies shoot arrows from the shoreline at the PCs,
>and the fire "attacks" the PCs,
>the fire is also attacking the boat, threatening to sink it in a few minutes (boat stress track as deadline pressure).
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Markus Wagner

Settings, Worlds, Rules  - 
 
Some more thoughts on Fate, Blood & Seven Sins.
After reading some feedback last week and thinking about the hack (game) myself, I am going to take stock again. Where am I at? What do I want to accomplish? What parts need to be addressed by the hack. First off, I've decide...
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SteamGeorge's profile photo
 
Interesting considerations, like to run a test game?
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+Paul Stefko​, are you planning any follow-up material for Psychemedia in the near future?
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Christopher Ruthenbeck's profile photoPaul Stefko's profile photo
2 comments
 
No plans. What kind of material would you be looking for?
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Jeffry Willis

Settings, Worlds, Rules  - 
 
Ya en la recta final puedo enseñaros el aspecto que tendrá la portada del juego de rol Bulldogs!, que como veis, lejos de ser una trepidante guía sobre perros, se trata de una trepidante space-oper...
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Jeff Jones

Discussion  - 
 
Has anybody added "traditional" dice rolls en lieu  of doing straight weapon damage? I know the toolkit had an option with colored fate dice  but I was wondering if anybody did something more straight like 1d4-1 or a 1d3-1 instead of W:3 or W2...or A:3 or A:2.     What are your thoughts?
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Jeff Jones's profile photo
14 comments
 
Jason, I would rather have somebody attempt to correct me for a perceived misunderstanding.
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The Mark

Settings, Worlds, Rules  - 
 
Page 91: Stunts and Creating a Rules Exception

What exactly, is an 'action' as used in the first sentence on page 91? I'm finding it all a bit ambiguous
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Jack Gulick's profile photoThe Mark's profile photo
3 comments
 
Thank you both for clarifying.
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The Mark

Settings, Worlds, Rules  - 
 
Will we ever see a Skyrim setting for Fate Core? One can dream
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Christopher Moore's profile photoDonato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi's profile photo
7 comments
 
Actually, you can open any TES wiki, examine it and then convert it to Fate. But, seeing how it was done in other hacks might give you some tips.
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The Mark

Settings, Worlds, Rules  - 
 
Page 71
"...if a player wants to compel another character, it costs a fate point to propose the complication."

So the fate point is given to the GM who holds it until the player being compelled accepts the compel - wherein the GM gives the player that fate point. I get that bit.

This bit

If the player refuses the compel, the fate point goes back to the original player who offered the compel, and the player who was the target of the compel, gives a fate point to the GM?

Is that correct?
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Jack Gulick's profile photoJohnathan Wright's profile photo
4 comments
 
This has probably been mentioned before, but in convention games GMs will often have a small pile of fate points in the middle of the table that players can use to compel other players. It really helps encourage interaction and rewards the players who are paying attention.
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About this community

This community is in place to provide a space to talk about all things Fate Core and Fate based games. Want to chat about a specific game? Start an online game? Find a local group or shop? This is the place to do it. Welcome, and have fun getting to know us! TOPICS OF INTEREST We welcome discussion about Fate Core derived games such as Fate Accelerated, Atomic Robo RPG, Do: Fate of the Flying Temple, Young Centurions, Shadow of the Century, Dresden Files Accelerated, and more from Fate's growing population of third-party publishers. "Retro" (pre-Core) Fate discussion is welcome as well. STICK A PIN IN IT (Use of . and /sub) We are a vibrant community with a deluge of great ideas! Because you have to comment on a post to be notified of replies, feel free to reply with "." or "/sub" to pin conversations that interest you.

Cyrus Bufkin

Settings, Worlds, Rules  - 
 
Hey guys! I'm trying to come up with a way to allow fate to be used as a basis for forum roleplay where a RNG isn't gurrenteed and where conflict resolution needs to be relatively snappy. So far I've got this: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1sIe3y6bgpj1gO4p0wF23x3db8LIAja_XiT5bxrfrbM8/edit?usp=docslist_api

I'd love some feedback or other ideas on how to accomplish this.
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James Etheridge's profile photoCyrus Bufkin's profile photo
13 comments
 
+James Etheridge  I'm trying to avoid anything that requires too much voting :) It would slow down resolution, and I expect there will already be some cries for an arbitration process for aspects. The sway points awarded along with fate points may work to inject more points into the system. Perhaps we could tie it in with the refresh rate as well? You never start a session break with less than your refresh rate or the like.

If I look back and consider sway points for stress taken, we're going to see a large increase of sway points in the economy. However, with a larger influx of points comes the need to put some point pits into the system so that there is some other level of management rather than just within the core mechanic. The problem here is that we'd be changing more than just the core mechanic to facilitate this, which means it would not be a drop in replacement.

For instance we could tie the resolution mechanic into the advancement mechanic something like (this is rough and uncalculated) 10 sway can translate into a Sway marker. A sway marker could be used to change your character like a minor milestone. Two sway markers could be used like a significant milestone and three could be used like a major milestone.

Hope you have a good day!
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Shawn Fike

Samples, Examples & Actual Play  - 
 
Thanks to the latest Humble Bundle, I have been playing Tomb Raider with every free moment for the last week (great game!). And so, I present to you my take on the heroine:

Lara Croft
HC: Action Archaeologist
TR: "I wonder what's over there?"
Other: Legacy of Adventure; Wealthy Heiress Out To Prove Herself; Beauty, Brains & Brawn

+4 (Great): Athletics
+3 (Good) : Shoot, Fight, Lore
+2 (Fair) : Physique, Will, Notice
+1 (Avg)  : Investigate, Resources, Stealth, Crafts

Stunts:
Because I am an Action Archaeologist, I get a +2 when using Athletics to Overcome obstacles related to reaching otherwise-inaccessible locations.
Because I Notice Everything, I gain a +2 to Create Advantage rolls with Notice when discovering scene aspects.
Because I am a Nimble Dodger, I get a +2 to Defend rolls with Athletics when facing multiple enemies.
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The Mark's profile photoShawn Fike's profile photo
4 comments
 
Ah. I have to many at +3. I'll correct it in a while.
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Taylor Hensley

Samples, Examples & Actual Play  - 
 
My group is putting out an Actual Play RPG Podcast using FATE. Our current campaign is Star Trek FATE. Give it a listen and let us know what you think.

#startrek #FATE #podcast #rpg  
We do a short intro into the Fate Core system and are introduced to our characters for their first year at the academy. Taylor = QChris = Cadet OanlJoshua = Cadet CantonKevin = Cadet KevlekTracy = Cadet VegralContact us:WebsiteFacebookburneverythinggaming@...
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Hugh Ashman's profile photoPierre Savoie's profile photoBrad Steffen's profile photo
6 comments
 
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Markus Wagner

Discussion  - 
 
Random observation: page 35 in the Fate System Toolkit describes stunts with a triggered effect. The examples read exactly like moves in games Powered by the Apocalypse (i.e. Monster of the Week, Dungeon World etc.)
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Philipp Pötz's profile photo
8 comments
 
Actually, I like such "triggered" stunts even more than the original stunts, because they feel less "mechanical" or "meta", however you wanna call it.

Normally, most stunts are built around "meta" thinking. Like, you get +2 when rolling [action] with [skill] in [trigger] situations – the only thing rooted in the narrative is the last part. Or, use [skill] in place of another skill during a challenge, allowing you to use [skill] twice in the same challenge. Or, use [skill] for rolls that you’d normally need [other skill] for in [trigger situation]. That's all a bit detatched from the actual narrative happening in-game.

"Triggered Effects" from the toolkit are somewhat different, as the central part of the stunt are not some "meta conditions", but narrative triggers. It's like, whenever you are in [trigger situation], roll the dice to gain [specific narrative permission/denial]. There's some mechanic involved, of course – the skill roll – but the stunts are built around the narrative, and the effects are of mainly narrative nature, too.

I like that, because it helps to reinforce who the character is in the fiction, rather than making him "more mechanically awesome". (And it helps counteracting the usual "Fate is way too meta!!!11" rant as well.)


And yeah, that's quite similar to some – not all – of the moves from Dungeon World.

Like, "when you consult the spirits that reside within your signature weapon, they will give you an insight relating to the current situation, and might ask you some questions in return, roll+CHA." (Fighter's Heirloom move), or "when you hold your holy symbol aloft and call on your deity for protection, roll+Wis; on a 7+, so long as you continue to pray and brandish your holy symbol, no undead may come within reach of you, on a 10+, you also momentarily daze intelligent undead and cause mindless undead to flee." (Cleric's Turn Undead move). Incidentally, the last one is almost identical to the Not to Be Trifled With "triggered effect" stunt presented in the toolkit.

But while you can get some inspiration from DW (or other *World engine games), don't forget that it has many other moves that are quite similar to "ordinary" Fate Core stunts, too, in that they're mainly mechanical in nature.

Like, "when you spout lore about a monster you use WIS instead of INT." (Ranger's Familiar Pray move) or "when you’re outnumbered, you have +1 armor" (Thief's Underdog move).

I consider DW's "narrative permission" giving moves the more interesting ones, but that doesn't mean the others don't have their place. Same way, I consider "triggered effect" stunts actually more interesting than the "ordinary" ones, but that doesn't mean they're superfluous or bad.


I think the important part for Fate to remember is that "triggered effects" don't just add story details or give you narrative permission to do something. That's what aspects for. Like, if you've got A Friend in Every Port as an aspect, that's what you have.

You can go drink beer with him or have a nice chat – but that doesn't mean he's per se useful for game purposes. That's what normally "declare a story detail" would be for – I've got this friend here, and y'know, he also happens to have heard something. Or I've got a friend, and he's actually willing and able to help us in some way despite possibly bringing himself into trouble.

A "triggered effect" stunt bypasses that necessity. It's function is basically quite similar to declaring story details, but you don't have to spend Fate points on every single occasion.

It has to be more effective than "regular" Create an Advantage or Overcome rolls that don't require a stunt, too. Sure, you might try to convince an acquaintance to help you despite some risks, if you find proper "leverage" (to use the DW term). But the A Friend in Every Port "triggered effect" stunt gives you a "shortcut": If you succeed, he ows you a favor (tell me what it is!). Even if you wouldn't have "leverage" otherwise, he'll help you, because favor is favor.


I'd be totally okay to ditch that skill roll necessity for some minor "triggered effects" as well. That's taking a leaf from DW, too, which has a number of such moves. There are moves that require a roll to achieve their effect, and there are others that give you a narrative edge simply by having them, but aren't as potent as those that do.

Like, "after you’ve used a poison once it’s no longer dangerous for you to use" (Thief's Poison Master move), or "When you have time and safety with a magic item you may ask the GM what it does, the GM will answer you truthfully" (Wizard's Enchanter move).

That's admittedly somewhat close to the narrative permissions aspects grant innately. But I think it has it's place, too, in some situations. I find it difficult to give any guidelines when I'd require such a stunt and when having an aspect alone is sufficient, because it's totally up to the genre you're playing. The closest thing to a guideline I can currently imagine is: If it allows you to kinda auto-succeed a roll you'd be otherwise required to pass, it's probably worth a stunt.

Man, that post got way longer than expected, and I'm used to writing ridiculously long comments...I hope I came to some kind of point nevertheless :)
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Dreamlord Press

Settings, Worlds, Rules  - 
 
A little sneak peak of the Hyonos, one of the character archetypes you'll find in Evolution Pulse
 
Evolution Pulse: Hyonos Character Archetype

Hekath are the evil, the darkness of human soul and the divine wrath that struck on our old world. You travel between LostZones searching for miserable souls to save, and you sacrificed your mundane life for a higher purpose: safety of the last remnants of humanity. Doomed to a life of struggle and suffering, you know your choice was the only one possible, because your sacrifice will allow many others to survive. Hekath are pure, feral and devastating hatred. You don't have any mercy, and you erect yourself as the bastion against the end of time.

Evolution Pulse Preview: http://rpg.drivethrustuff.com/product/144528/Evolution-Pulse

#evolutionpulse   #hyonos  
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Off topic rant : what kind of things you do to put your player into mood for an adventure?

I had the crazy (!?) idea to be costumed as a toon next time I go GM my Fate of Saturday Comics scenario. Is this too crazy? Would you go this to put players into the scenario's mood? 
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Fábio Emilio Costa's profile photoAlexander Keane's profile photo
5 comments
 
I've worn a cloak to a game I was in. But that's because my cloak had just been made and I wanted excuses to wear it.

For Fate, the collaborative world building tends to get my players in the mood to play real quick. Maybe let the players build one or two locations.
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Albert Holaso

Fate Accelerated Edition (FAE)  - 
 
I illustrated material for a FATE ACCELERATED product, check out the game supplement here produced by Knuckledown Press

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/279437836/narrative-encounters-for-fate-accelerated-edition
Knuckledown Press LLC is raising funds for Narrative Encounters for Fate Accelerated Edition on Kickstarter! Everything you need to play a quick game of high fantasy swords and sorcery in Fate Accelerated Edition
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Dylan Ross's profile photoAlbert Holaso's profile photo
3 comments
 
thanks! I appreciate it 
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Hello.  I am running a Star Wars game that revolves around an ancient archaeology mystery that could imperil the whole galaxy.  I remember reading somewhere about making Mysteries into characters and having the investigator make attacks and so forth to solve them and I think that sounds like a perfect fit for my situation.  Problem is that I have so many different Fate books that I can't for the life of me find it.  Does anyone know what I am talking about?  Also I would love to hear some advice on how to set such a thing up and run it.  
This site is best viewed using Google Chrome. Please continue on to the Main Page. The Evil Hat Games © 2012 edition of FATE Core! which uses the FATE system, a Fudge variant developed by Evil Hat Productions provides the bulk of the rules. The Galileo Games © 2011 edition of Bulldogs! which uses the FATE system, a Fudge variant developed by Evil Hat Productions provides the species rules for the game. Some additional rules and inspiration also ...
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HumAnnoyd's profile photo
4 comments
 
Oh and thank you for replying. :D
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U'Mascariatu Erich

Settings, Worlds, Rules  - 
 
Social conflict vs player interpretation

Here's my question : there is a way to integrate the social conflict in Fate a series in-role  exchanges between characters and the actual Fate rules for social conflict?

A thing me and my group found difficult to implement in a Fate-based game is social conflict. The main reason is we are used -from the time before Fate Core.  to give relevance to in-role interpretation in social conflict, that is the players interpret in role the conflict saying what the characters would actually say in play,  the process is very similar on what happens in real life when I would convince someone. The process is complemented by one roll but often that wasn't necessary.

Now Fate have a structured way to do social conflicts, I like it but seems to me it would be lost part of the interpretative part, infact either this happened or we didn't use that part of FC rules in or game.
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James Etheridge's profile photoJack Gulick's profile photoSean West Money's profile photo
17 comments
 
Sure do.  If it's obvious, we don't roll for it.  That's what concessions are for, it's what compels are for, and it's what narrative permission is for.  In most important fact, it's what the Golden Rule is for, and what the Silver Rule reinforces.

"Decide what you’re trying to accomplish first, then consult the rules to help you do it."

"Never let the rules get in the way of what makes narrative sense."

I 100% agree that you can come up with interesting failures and roll.  It's not a bad idea at all.  But it's not necessary to roll to use the game's mechanics, it's not necessary to roll to introduce drama.  Fate's mechanics exist beyond using skills and dice to resolve an action.  Sometimes, the result is obvious and you simply apply the result.  Sometimes it isn't and you roll to determine the non-obvious parts.

The former is just as much using the rules as the latter, just as much playing the game as the latter.

My best advice is to not trick yourself into thinking the two are as different as you think.  They are, in fact, very close relatives on a sliding scale.

My 2nd best advice is to use the dice less often, to let the narrative tell you what happens without any new information.  You really don't need new infromation every action.  Sometimes, you already have enough information to know what the right result is.  And, in social scenes, especially small-scale social scenes (where there isn't the broad element of the mood of a crowd or such, which probably is best left to the dice), the table already knows the minds of the participants better than the dice.  Unlike a combat, where "random" events are occurring (does the blade slip along the armor?  does it catch a chink in the mail?  does the round tumble a bit and catch a wind and go a hair wide?), there isn't so much randomness (but perhaps quite a bit of indeterminate information; the more NPCs, IMO, the more the GM needs to lean on this) in a social scene.  If the GM knows the NPCs' minds, the players know the PCs' minds, then just let that knowledge rule and roll when it seems there is doubt.

The role of the dice (in large part, if not completely) is to fill in the information we don't already know and don't feel like continuing to delve to discover by discussion, not to change information we already have.  If we already know enough to move on, we should move on.

And yeah, every table's comfort point is different.  Which is true of any question of narrative permissions and interpretation of facts in play.  Some people need more information before moving on, and that can mean turning to the dice.  But don't create an artificial divide between "play using the dice" and "play not using the rules".  That isn't where the split lies at all.  Lots of play that never picks up the dice is still using the rules.

Yes, my opinions here are formed by years of Amber Diceless play, and I realize many others aren't comfortable there.  My advice is to try it...  It works far better than you might think!

As for a scene... a scene exists if the result of ALL the actions is uncertain.  Which can be just as much because we don't know which actions will be taken as that we don't know if they'll succeed.  You can play out a tense, dramatic scene without needing any external randomness just from the uncertainty of which options the sides will take.  This is why Chess is still a game, despite lacking dice.

Do most scenes want dice now and then?  Yes.  Even most social scenes.  But many actions do not need them, particularly many social actions.  Sometimes, the result is just obvious and if it needs mechanics at all, might be a compel or a fiat creation of an aspect or a create advantage or overcome ruled a simple success (or even a success with style) by table consensus.  The dice are a tool the table uses to help them decide, not the deciders.
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