Think About the Future
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We LOVE the latest Fw:Thinking episode! It's a wonderful interview with IRIM's Henrik Christensen. Thanks so much for your great work on it. If you are eager for more—tune in at 3:30 p.m. EST today for a Hangout with Henrik —he'll talk more about robotics at Georgia Tech, cool new robot applications, and tell you about our special robot trading cards project with IEEE and iRobot.

https://plus.google.com/110199970157164695531/posts/4MtLrwAL9pi
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The Crimeans have made a decision.  90 % have voted to break away from Ukraine and reunite with Russia.  Turn out at the polls was 83% of the population.
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Alan Watts on Socially Responsible Automation and an Unconditional Basic Income Guarantee
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d0nj03's profile photoDorian Greer's profile photo
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d0nj03
 
I don't consider you as having paid your debt to society, but if there is to be introduced a Basic Income scheme I do agree that you as well as every other person should receive whatever the equal allocation is determined to be according to that scheme.

In any case, if you think your education has been equitably paid back just because the professors got some trivial fixed salary via some trivial taxes, your have clearly failed to understand what I was talking about. The true value of education is unknown until the recipients of that education put it to use and get all the income they can get on the basis of that education throughout their lives. The proper way to pay professors would be to give them some fixed "immediate salary" for the immediately-apparent value they're offering by being the classroom (or as an immediate motivator to get them to perform the activity rather than staying home to collect their basic income) PLUS a "continuous salary" in the form of some small percentage of everything their students will earn as long as they live and work, wherever the productive activity will have involved in some measure the education they have received from this particular professor. If you think at this time (assuming your formal education is over) you have completely and equitably paid back all your professors for everything you have received from them, you are severely deluded. :)
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PostHuman: An Introduction to Transhumanism
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The sad thing is is that we can't even keep our oceans and waterways clean. 
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Manu Sankar's profile photoMuhammed Zamroodh's profile photoDorian Greer's profile photo
 
Didn't actually describe what it would actually sound like, but gave somewhat of a hint. 
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Michael Estey

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I am not a man, I'm not an animal, I am a human being, I am a woman!
I tweeked a John Merrick quote, just for this blog.
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Michael Estey

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Thanks for the invite.   Now this was a little forward thinking back in Magellan's time...
What's the difference between Relative truth and Absolute truth? Besides one being Relative and the other Absolute. Aye! What the hell! I had to look it up.
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About this community

It's about technology. It's about humanity. It's about our future. It's Fw:Thinking. Powered by Toyota.
 
What do you think Harper will do when aliens arrive on earth?
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Peter Pflaum

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Sturgeon's Law: prov.
“Ninety percent of everything is crud” i.e. not high quality, true, beautiful, and good. 
including  Adages, Clarke's Three Laws, Finagle's Law, Godwin's Law, Kiss Principle, Laws Of Infernal Dynamics, Law Of Averages, Peter Principle, Pareto Principle, Occam's Razor, Ninety-ninety Rule, Hanlon's Razor, Gresham's Law, Murphy's Law, Parkinson's laws and YouTube channels - politicians, voters, art. books, plumbers, teachers, administration, courts, marriages, religions, jobs, etc. 

The Peter Principle is a management theory which suggests that organizations risk filling management roles with people who are incompetent if they promote those who are performing well at their current role, rather than those who have proven abilities at the intended role. It is named after Laurence J. Peter who co-authored the 1969 humorous book The Peter Principle: Why Things Always Go Wrong with Raymond Hull. They suggest that people will tend to be promoted until they reach their "position of incompetence".

Clarke's Three Laws are three "laws" of prediction formulated by the British writer Arthur C. Clarke. They are:
1) When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. 
2.) When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.
The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture a little way past them into the impossible.
3.) Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

Sturgeon's Law: prov.
“Ninety percent of everything is crud”. Derived from a quote by science fiction author Theodore Sturgeon, who once said, “Sure, 90% of science fiction is crud. That's because 90% of everything is crud.” Sturgeon himself called this “Sturgeon's Revelation”, and it first appeared in the March 1958 issue of Venture Science Fiction; he gave Sturgeon's Law as “Nothing is always absolutely so.” Compare Hanlon's Razor, Ninety-Ninety Rule. Though this maxim originated in SF fandom, most hackers recognize it and are all too aware of its truth.

A corollary of Finagle's Law, similar to Occam's Razor, that reads “Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity.” Quoted here because it seems to be a particular favorite of hackers, often showing up in sig blocks, fortune cookie files and the login banners of BBS systems and commercial networks. This probably reflects the hacker's daily experience of environments created by well-intentioned but short-sighted people. Compare Sturgeon's Law, Ninety-Ninety Rule.

 However, a curiously similar remark (“You have attributed conditions to villainy that simply result from stupidity.”) appears in Logic of Empire, a classic 1941 SF story by Robert A. Heinlein, who calls the error it indicates the ‘devil theory’ of sociology. Similar epigrams have been attributed to William James and (on dubious evidence) Napoleon Bonaparte.

Before too many years had gone by variants had passed into the popular imagination, changing as they went. Most of these are variants on "Anything that can go wrong, will"; this is more correctly referred to as Finagle's Law. The memetic drift apparent in these mutants clearly demonstrates Murphy's Law acting on itself!

Finagle's Law:
The generalized or "folk" version of Murphy's Law, fully named "Finagle's Law of Dynamic Negatives" and usually rendered "Anything that can go wrong, will". May have been first published by Francis P. Chisholm in his 1963 essay The Chisholm Effect, later reprinted in the classic anthology A Stress Analysis Of A Strapless Evening Gown: And Other Essays For A Scientific Eye (Robert Baker ed, Prentice-Hall, ISBN 0-13-852608-7).

As a result, Dr. Juran's observation of the "vital few and trivial many", the principle that 20 percent of something always are responsible for 80 percent of the results, became known as Pareto's Principle or the 80/20 Rule.

Gresham’s law, observation in economics that “bad money drives out good.” More exactly, if coins containing metal of different value have the same value as legal tender, the coins composed of the cheaper metal will be used for payment, while those made of more expensive metal will be hoarded or exported and thus tend to disappear from circulation.

Every social, intellectual political, religious doctrine, or framework is an impediment to seeing reality clearly and not through a smoked glass darkly. GOOD white and EVIL black are constructs  ( and distort the 1000 shades of gray, the true, the beautiful, wise, accepted, authoritarian, Orthodox, patriotism, nationalism, socialism, Fascism, democracy, Christianity, Hinduism, Dadaism, Islam, zen, Buddhism, Confucius, anarchistic, enlightened, reasonable, scientific, all prejudice the information and squish it into acceptable categories  ( called bias, bigotry, class and racial preconceptions.

These frames are absolutely necessary to operate in reality.  Just be sure you are aware of framing and look out for others framing for you.
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Good morning !! Great read 
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What is the zombie app called
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armando sori

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Can We Live Forever? |  +TheAdvancedApes | +PBSDigitalStudios

Humans have always dreamed of eternal youth and life. Throughout history our desire for longer life spans manifested itself in religion and mythology. Today, our dreams of eternity are being explored scientifically. Where could sciences related to ending aging take our species in the future? Could the science of the 21st century lead to radical life extension? 
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Peter Pflaum

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http://www.scoop.it/t/future-by-peter-e-pflaum

Death and Rebirth of Seneca The story of Paradigm, gestalt death and rebirth
Anthony Wallace
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Sep 1, 2010 -
Then Handsome Lake had his vision. A revival began. 
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armando sori

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(a documentary film on technological unemployment)
Will Work For Free | OFFICIAL RELEASE | 2013
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Peter Pflaum

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"The dogmas of the quiet past are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think anew and act anew. We must disenthrall ourselves, and then we shall save our country.."  Second State of the Union address (1862) A. Lincoln
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Michael Estey

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  "The Cannabus" 
So far, the campaign is 15,000 signatures short of its target of 80,000 signatures, but still within range of hitting our targets, growing larger every day."
Dana Larsen, founder and spokesman.
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Michael Estey

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Here is a forward thinker...
Stories of self healing "Mind over Matter," are an inspiration to all of us.
Norman Cousins. The author of "Anatomy of an Illness" published in 1979 and long time editor of "The Saturday Review." 
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