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Caleb Love
moderator

Family Tree  - 
 
In order to provide a better support experience for our patrons, we will be closing this Google+ community in the next two weeks and directing people to join our FamilySearch Groups beta community in platform called Yammer.
To receive an invitation, please click the link below:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/17rzCcef-eKpg0LeGl_BIOILMzZ6vGwk7GVBxMCIlpQg/viewform

For those of you who would prefer to continue to receive information inside of Google+, most of the information you find in this community will be published on our FamilySearch Google+ page:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+familysearch/posts

For those looking for Research Help, we also have Research Support Communities inside of Facebook where you can receive regionally specific research help. Here is a link to all of the regional groups.
https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/Genealogy_Help_on_Facebook
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Yammer Community RequestFill the form out below and we will send you an email invitation into Yammer where you can find and join the FamilySearch groups you are interested in.
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The posts will go away Wendy...  You'll still be able to find some if not most of them on the FamilySearch Blog...   https://familysearch.org/blog/en/
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Caleb Love
moderator

FamilySearch  - 
 
In order to provide a better support experience for our patrons, we will be closing this Google+ community in the next two weeks and directing people to join our FamilySearch Groups beta community in platform called Yammer.
To receive an invitation, please click the link below:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/17rzCcef-eKpg0LeGl_BIOILMzZ6vGwk7GVBxMCIlpQg/viewform

For those of you who would prefer to continue to receive information inside of Google+, most of the information you find in this community will be published on our FamilySearch Google+ page:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+familysearch/posts

For those looking for Research Help, we also have Research Support Communities inside of Facebook where you can receive regionally specific research help. Here is a link to all of the regional groups.
https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/Genealogy_Help_on_Facebook
Drive
Yammer Community RequestFill the form out below and we will send you an email invitation into Yammer where you can find and join the FamilySearch groups you are interested in.
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James Ellison

Discussion  - 
Genealogy Weekend Warrior Project #4: Time to find, scan, cite, and save your precious photos--you may just find a clue you’ve been looking for!
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Caleb Love
moderator

News and Events  - 
 
In order to provide a better support experience for our patrons, we will be closing this Google+ community in the next two weeks and directing people to join our FamilySearch Groups beta community in platform called Yammer.
To receive an invitation, please click the link below:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/17rzCcef-eKpg0LeGl_BIOILMzZ6vGwk7GVBxMCIlpQg/viewform

For those of you who would prefer to continue to receive information inside of Google+, most of the information you find in this community will be published on our FamilySearch Google+ page:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+familysearch/posts

For those looking for Research Help, we also have Research Support Communities inside of Facebook where you can receive regionally specific research help. Here is a link to all of the regional groups.
https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/Genealogy_Help_on_Facebook
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Lineage Keeper

Research Tips  - 
 
FamilySearch: Bring a Family Story to Life with Oral Histories

Do you have an family member that tells the funniest family stories? I do. My Aunt Peg remembers important details about the lives of my grandparents—and more importantly about my deceased mother—that really bring me back to a formative time in my family’s history. Without my mom, Aunt Peg is my connection to the past. But what happens when Peg is no longer around?

Meet oral histories. Though it sounds like something your dentist might keep of your molars and bicuspids, an oral history is actually a verbal record of a single family story or a lifetime of experiences by someone who lived them. Oral histories are a very important part of family history.

Follow the simple tips in the following infographic to get started. More detailed instructions are available in an informative article on the FamilySearch Wiki.

https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/Creating_Oral_Histories

#genealogy #familysearch #oralhistory #oralhistories
Do you have an family member that tells the funniest family stories? I do. My Aunt Peg remembers important details about the lives of my grandparents—and more importantly about my deceased mother—t...
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Gino Brennan

Discussion  - 
 
How do I find New York birth and marriage certificates for ancestors. I am working on my families genealogy family tree. The census was a great help but I need to connect the dots. I am new to this and have found most of my great grandparents, But I need more information and to confirm my findings. Thank you in advance for any input you can share.
From,
Gino

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Lineage Keeper

Family History Libraries  - 
 
FamilySearch: Free May Webinars from the Family History Library  

Have you ever wanted to attend one of the classes at the Family History Library, but you live too far away or just don’t have the time to come? Good news! You are now able to view many of the Family History Library classes as webinars. These webinars cover a variety of topics and countries. During May, all webinars are in English except for one in Spanish. See the following list for details. (All times are in mountain daylight time.)

For North American ancestry:

* United States Records before 1850, May 12, 6:00 p.m.
* United States Church and Cemetery Records, May 26, 1:00 p.m.

The British Isles team offers a unique style of hands-on and research strategy webinars along with other classes:

* Ireland Hands-On Case Study and Brainstorming Session, May 3, 1:00 p.m.
* Tracing Scottish Ancestry in Nonparochial Registers, May 12, 1:00 p.m.,
* More Irish than the Irish Themselves: The Hiberno-Norman Families, May 16, 2:00 p.m.
* British Research Problem Strategy Session, May 26, 2:00 p.m.

If you are interested in learning more about your Norwegian ancestry, check out these two webinars:

* Exploring Norwegian Emigration Records: Finding Place of Origin, May 20, 11:00 a.m.
* Exploring Church Records in Norway, May 20, 1:00 p.m.

For help in finding elusive ancestors in Sweden, you will want to attend these webinars:

* Figure Out Place-Names for Swedish Genealogy, May 27, 1:00 p.m.
* Interpreting Money in Swedish Records, May 27, 2:00 p.m.

Have you tried searching for Swiss ancestors but had no luck? This webinar will help you narrow possible locations for Swiss ancestors:

* Register of Swiss Surnames, May 14, 10:00 a.m.

This month also has a special Mexico theme day, with webinars focused on helping those who have ancestors from Mexico. You will learn the basics of Hispanic research and how to use various websites for Mexico research. Three webinars are offered:

* Relatives Masked in the Ancestry Indexes, May 21, 1:00 p.m.
* I’ve Found My Abuela in Mexico! Next Steps, May 21, 2:00 p.m.
* Online Resources for Mexico, May 21, 3:00 p.m.

The following webinar is available only in Spanish. This month, learn the basics of FamilySearch Family Tree by attending:

* Descubre Árbol Familiar de FamilySearch, May 7, 1:00 p.m.

To view these webinars live, click the title of the webinar you would like to attend. We recommend that you enter the webinar about 15 minutes before the start time to ensure your connection is functioning properly. All these webinars will be recorded and posted on the FamilySearch Wiki page Family History Library Classes and Webinars. On this page you will find information about upcoming webinars, links for webinar classrooms, links to handouts, and past webinars.

Note: See the original post below for the links to the webinars listed in this post:

#genealogy #familysearch #webinar #training #familysearchlibrary
Have you ever wanted to attend one of the classes at the Family History Library, but you live too far away or just don’t have the time to come? Good news! You are now able to view many of the...
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James Ellison

Discussion  - 
Genealogy Weekend Warrior Project #3: A source citation on the front of all printed documents is the standard for professional and proficient genealogists.
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Lineage Keeper

Family Tree  - 
 
Popular Mobile Apps for Finding Local History

This entry is part 3 of 3 in the series: Exploring the Use of Local Histories in Genealogy Research

In last week’s article, we explored three websites that offer a wealth of information on local history: Historypin.org, WhatWasThere.com, and TheClio.com. Each of these sites offers photos, documents, and other digital items pinned to a map that will help you celebrate and learn more about an area’s local history.

“There’s a reason why we need to look at local history,” said professional genealogist Amy Johnson Crow in her 2016 RootsTech presentation. “We need to understand where our ancestors lived because the area where they lived and when they were living there had such an effect on them. We have to understand where they lived because otherwise we’re getting an incomplete picture of who they were.”

This article describes two of the many apps and resources that can help you find information on local history.

Field Trip

Field Trip is an app available for both iOS and Android. This app will help you learn about the local history of the area you are in, as well as information about the hottest restaurants and shopping malls near that location.

“There is a ton of history entries in Field Trip,” said Amy Johnson Crow as she demonstrated the app to the RootsTech audience. “You’ll see things for restaurants and lifestyle places, so it isn’t strictly a history app, but you will also see historic sites that are nearby.”

The Field Trip app functions according to a user’s location, not according to a search.

“This is an app that is very much in the moment,” explained Crow. “It’s very much like, ‘Hey, I happen to be standing here, and what’s the history around me?’ Think about how cool this would be if you’re out on a walking tour with the kids. It’s like, ‘Oh, did you know that over there is such-and-so?’ It’s all based on your location.”

depends on your location, you will need to enable the GPS location settings on your device; otherwise, the app won’t know where you are. Once you’ve opened the app, you’ll see a list of all entries near your general area. One of the suppliers to Field Trip is Arcadia Publishing, so you’ll see a lot of the same photographs that you’re familiar with from Arcadia local history books.

Crow says that an app such as this is useful because it can help you think not only of your ancestors’ locations, but it will help you consider the area in which you’re now living.

“No matter what website or app you’re looking at, don’t think only about the locations where your ancestors were living. Think about where you’re living,” she said. “I’m using this app to learn more about my local history.”

Instagram

It’s likely that you’ve already got Instagram installed on your phone. After all, the social app has 400 million monthly active users, according to CNBC. You’re probably pretty skilled at sharing pictures of food or family within the app, but did you know you can also use Instagram to explore local history?

“If you think Instagram is only for food, vacation, and cat photos, I hope you’ll be pleasantly surprised that there are other things that you can explore,” said Crow. “Two ways you can use Instagram for local history: first, follow users like different libraries and archives and museums; second, follow specific hashtags.”

Crow suggests following accounts such as the Atlanta History Center, the Missouri History Museum, the US National Archives, and the Genealogy Center in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

“It’s amazing what they will take photos of and share,” said Crow.

Hashtags are also a great way to follow a conversation and learn information on local history. Hashtags on Instagram are links that you can click to see all the photos and discussions going on that use the same hashtag.

“But what if we don’t see a photo that has a hashtag that we like?” asked Crow to the RootsTech audience. “We can actually go and search for it. When you’re on Instagram, tap the little magnifying glass icon at the very bottom on the screen.”

By tapping the magnifying glass icon, you can search for information by using place-names or hashtags.

To learn about other ways you can use Instagram for family history, read our post 3 Ways to Use Instagram for Family History.

What mobile apps do you use to explore local histories? Tweet us @RootsTechConf.

See the original post below for all of the related links mentioned in this article:

#genealogy   #familysearch     #apps  
In last week’s article, we explored three websites that offer a wealth of information on local history: Historypin.org, WhatWasThere.com, and TheClio.com. Each of these sites offers photos, d...
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thank you
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James Ellison

Discussion  - 
 
Spring has sprung and so have the allergies! Did your #ancestors treat allergies with local honey? Read more about "Old Remedies for What Ailed Them." #RootsBid #genealogy #familyhistory #remedy

http://rootsbid.com/blog/old-remedies-for-what-ailed-them/
What did our ancestors do when they had a headache or other more serious ailment? Here are a few strange old remedies for what ailed them!
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About this community

In order to provide a better support experience for our patrons, we will be closing this Google+ community in the next two weeks and directing people to join our FamilySearch Groups beta community in platform called Yammer. To receive an invitation, please click the link below: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/17rzCcef-eKpg0LeGl_BIOILMzZ6vGwk7GVBxMCIlpQg/viewform For those of you who would prefer to continue to receive information inside of Google+, most of the information you find in this community will be published on our FamilySearch Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+familysearch/posts For those looking for Research Help, we also have Research Support Communities inside of Facebook where you can receive regionally specific research help. Here is a link to all of the regional groups. https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/Genealogy_Help_on_Facebook

Caleb Love
moderator

Beginning Researcher  - 
 
In order to provide a better support experience for our patrons, we will be closing this Google+ community in the next two weeks and directing people to join our FamilySearch Groups beta community in platform called Yammer.
To receive an invitation, please click the link below:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/17rzCcef-eKpg0LeGl_BIOILMzZ6vGwk7GVBxMCIlpQg/viewform

For those of you who would prefer to continue to receive information inside of Google+, most of the information you find in this community will be published on our FamilySearch Google+ page:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+familysearch/posts

For those looking for Research Help, we also have Research Support Communities inside of Facebook where you can receive regionally specific research help. Here is a link to all of the regional groups.
https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/Genealogy_Help_on_Facebook
Drive
Yammer Community RequestFill the form out below and we will send you an email invitation into Yammer where you can find and join the FamilySearch groups you are interested in.
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Caleb Love
moderator

Member Introductions  - 
 
In order to provide a better support experience for our patrons, we will be closing this Google+ community in the next two weeks and directing people to join our FamilySearch Groups beta community in platform called Yammer.
To receive an invitation, please click the link below:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/17rzCcef-eKpg0LeGl_BIOILMzZ6vGwk7GVBxMCIlpQg/viewform

For those of you who would prefer to continue to receive information inside of Google+, most of the information you find in this community will be published on our FamilySearch Google+ page:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+familysearch/posts

For those looking for Research Help, we also have Research Support Communities inside of Facebook where you can receive regionally specific research help. Here is a link to all of the regional groups.
https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/Genealogy_Help_on_Facebook
Drive
Yammer Community RequestFill the form out below and we will send you an email invitation into Yammer where you can find and join the FamilySearch groups you are interested in.
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Lineage Keeper

Research Training Courses  - 
 
FamilySearch: The Family History Library Announces Free Classes for May 2016

During the month of May, the Family History Library will be hosting a number of free online family history classes and webinars. These classes and webinars are designed to help individuals and families find their ancestors and teach important family history techniques. They are free to the public. Information about specific classes is listed below, as well as information on how to register for classes.

May 3- 1:00 P.M. Ireland Hands-On Case Study and Brainstorming Session Webinar

May 4- 10:00 A.M. Italian Records Indexing Webinar (1½ hours)

May 5- 10:00 A.M. Organizing Your Genealogy

May 7- 1:00 P.M. Descubre Árbol Familiar de FamilySearch Webinar

May 11- 10:00 A.M. Spanish Records Indexing Webinar (1½ hours)

May 12- 1:00 P.M. Tracing Scottish Ancestry in Nonparochial Registers Webinar

May 12- 6:00 P.M. United States Records before 1850 Webinar

May 14- 10:00 A.M. Register of Swiss Surnames Webinar

May 16- 2:00 P.M. More Irish Than the Irish themselves: The Hiberno–Norman Families

May 17- 1:00 P.M. Pennsylvania Land Records

May 18- 10:00 A.M. Portuguese Records Indexing Webinar

May 19- 10:00 A.M. Overview of American Indian Research

May 20- 11:00 A.M. Exploring Norwegian Emigration Records: Finding Place of Origin Webinar

May 20- 1:00 P.M. Exploring “Church Records” in Norway

May 21- 10:00 A.M. Boy Scout Genealogy Merit Badge (1½ hours) To register, call 1-801-240-4673 at least one week before the workshop to find out which requirements should be completed before attending.

May 21- 1:00 P.M. Relatives Masked in the Ancestry Indexes Webinar

May 21- 2:00 P.M. I’ve Found My Abuela in Mexico! Next Steps Webinar

May 21- 3:00 P.M. Online Resources for Mexico Webinar

May 24- 2:00 P.M. Beginning Australian Research Webinar

May 25- 10:00 A.M. French Records Indexing Webinar (1½ hours)

May 26- 12:00 P.M. United States Church and Cemetery Records Webinar

May 26- 2:00 P.M. British Research Problem Strategy Session Webinar

To join a webinar, go to the Family History Library wiki page, select a month, then scroll to find the desired class.

https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/Family_History_Library#Classes_and_Online_Webinars.C2.A0

#genealogy  #familysearch   #training
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Caleb Love
moderator

FamilySearch  - 
 
In order to provide a better support experience for our patrons, we will be closing this Google+ community in the next two weeks and directing people to join our FamilySearch Groups beta community in platform called Yammer.
To receive an invitation, please click the link below:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/17rzCcef-eKpg0LeGl_BIOILMzZ6vGwk7GVBxMCIlpQg/viewform

For those of you who would prefer to continue to receive information inside of Google+, most of the information you find in this community will be published on our FamilySearch Google+ page:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+familysearch/posts

For those looking for Research Help, we also have Research Support Communities inside of Facebook where you can receive regionally specific research help. Here is a link to all of the regional groups.
https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/Genealogy_Help_on_Facebook
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Caleb Love
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
In order to provide a better support experience for our patrons, we will be closing this Google+ community in the next two weeks and directing people to join our FamilySearch Groups beta community in platform called Yammer.
To receive an invitation, please click the link below:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/17rzCcef-eKpg0LeGl_BIOILMzZ6vGwk7GVBxMCIlpQg/viewform

For those of you who would prefer to continue to receive information inside of Google+, most of the information you find in this community will be published on our FamilySearch Google+ page:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+familysearch/posts

For those looking for Research Help, we also have Research Support Communities inside of Facebook where you can receive regionally specific research help. Here is a link to all of the regional groups.
https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/Genealogy_Help_on_Facebook
Drive
Yammer Community RequestFill the form out below and we will send you an email invitation into Yammer where you can find and join the FamilySearch groups you are interested in.
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Lineage Keeper

Family Tree  - 
 
FamilySearch Working to Avoid ‘Success Disaster’
By Craig Miller, director of Product Engineering

The late Cambridge computer scientist Roger Needham coined the term “Success Disaster” to describe a product or service that is so successful it overwhelms the organization that created it. Business journals are filled with horror stories of tech companies that have undergone hyper-growth and mismanaged it.

Over the past two years, FamilySearch has experienced faster-than-anticipated growth due to the phenomenal success of our marketing, genealogical-record acquisitions, partner development, and product-software improvements. In 2015, 1.6 million members visited FamilySearch Family Tree, and nearly 430,000 submitted names for temple work—approximately 27 percent growth over 2014. This growth pattern has continued into 2016. Since 2015, we have seen Family Tree database transactions increase from less than 200 million to more than 630 million a day on Sundays. Records are also being viewed and attached at ever-increasing rates. The number of names being added to the tree each week has nearly doubled when compared to a year ago. This success has placed a strain on the performance and stability of the FamilySearch database and network infrastructure, and has prompted product engineering staff to implement costly workarounds and expedite its growth-management plans.

How We Plan to Avoid “Success Disaster”

At the core of the FamilySearch growth-management plan are Cassandra and Amazon Web Services (AWS). Cassandra is the name of an open-source noSQL database designed for high performance, availability, and scalability. AWS is a highly secure and reliable cloud-computing platform that will grow as we do. Moving to Cassandra and AWS will give FamilySearch a scalable foundation that effectively removes the threat of future growth-related success disasters.

Although many of our great software engineers are consumed with our growth-management plan, Product Engineering continues to release innovative new features to our patrons. Recent advancements include (1) the ability to print temple ordinance cards from home, (2) improvements in contextual help, and (3) the generation of new hints within 10 minutes of a name being added.

#genealogy   #familysearch   #familysearchtree
By Craig Miller, director of Product Engineering The late Cambridge computer scientist Roger Needham coined the term “Success Disaster” to describe a product or service that is so successful it ove...
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Lineage Keeper

FamilySearch Blog  - 
 
FamilySearch Blog: The Find a Grave Gold Rush!
by Logan Steele

Not long ago I attended a genealogy conference in Mesa, Arizona. An overwhelming number of courses were offered at the same time, and it was a challenge to decide which to attend. I ended up asking one of the volunteers to determine my fate. That he did, and I headed off to room 201, “Find A Grave.”

There was standing room only as presenter Shirley Nance took her place at the head of the classroom. While the basics were being covered, I couldn’t help but wonder how much harder it was going to be to convince millennials that genealogy is a youthful activity when I’m sitting in a course titled, “Find A Grave.” The thought was short-lived, however, as I quickly became consumed by interest in this fascinating program.

FindAGrave.com is an online database, where you are able to visit virtually a loved one’s final resting place from almost anywhere and at any time. It also can provide a trove of useful information about your ancestors. For example, the photo of a headstone is a terrific resource to confirm the spelling of an ancestor’s name and what years the ancestor lived. Another useful tip provided by Shirley Nance was that family members are often buried close together. After locating the gravestone of an ancestor, look around! There’s a solid chance you’ll discover family members nearby that you never knew existed.

FindAGrave.com also provides a wonderful community experience. If there is an ancestor buried in a cemetery far from where you live, simply put in a request for a photo to be taken. I gave this feature a try, and my request was filled in less than one week. Since this resource is a two-way street, I am able to look for any requests in my area and take a photo for someone else. This activity may be one of the greatest service projects that can be done by taking a picture with your phone.

There’s one more item I want to address, mainly because it’s hard to ignore. FindAGrave.com looks like a dated website, but for a good reason. Think of it like the California gold rush. At first, who had time to set up better equipment with all that gold pouring in? FindAGrave.com is a family history gold mine, experiencing a rush of its own.

Now it’s time for you to find some family gold by exploring this groundbreaking program. This Memorial Day, download the Find A Grave mobile app, and add a photo of the grave of an ancestor or fill a request for someone else. FindAGrave.comwill leave you feeling connected to your family line in a thrilling new way.

#genealogy   #familysearch   #findagrave
Not long ago I attended a genealogy conference in Mesa, Arizona. An overwhelming number of courses were offered at the same time, and it was a challenge to decide which to attend. I ended up asking...
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Jeannette Austin

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Hugh Mercer. Great Patriots of the Revolutionary War
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Lineage Keeper

FamilySearch Blog  - 
 
FamilySearch: New Freedmen’s Bureau Records Made Searchable through Ongoing Project

Another milestone has been reached in efforts to complete the Freedmen’s Bureau Project. We’d like to provide an update on the progress of the project and let you know where we are in the publication of indexed content. In addition, we’d like your help in focusing on three of our more challenging record sets to get them closer to completion.

Thanks to the help of 17,640 volunteers, the Freedmen’s Bureau Project has achieved unprecedented success. To date, the names of 1,469,574 freed slaves and others have been unearthed through the tireless support of indexers around the world. We have cause to celebrate that this project is 70 percent complete. And with your continued support, we will make our goal of being 100 percent complete by Juneteenth (June 19)!

Thirteen records sets make up the content we are indexing to make searchable on FamilySearch.org and in a database that will be given to the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). We are excited to be able to provide this database as an artifact for the new museum when it opens on September 24, 2016, in Washington, DC.

This content includes marriage records, labor contracts, education records, and more. Many people have asked, “What does it mean when we say we are 70 percent complete?” It means that 70 percent of the batches of images (groups of two to five documents) contained in the 13 record sets have been indexed and arbitrated and will be published on FamilySearch.org in the coming months.

1. Hospital and Medical Records (137,124 records)
2. Marriages (42,119 records)

These records contain new content about individuals who may have never before been documented in history! Click the links above to search these collections by name, and see for yourself. Although hospital and marriage records are small collections in terms of the number of names included in the documents, these records—marriage records in particular—are valuable for reconstructing families that were once torn apart by slavery. This is just the tip of the iceberg!

Four other record sets have been indexed and arbitrated and are awaiting publication to become searchable online.

1. Freedmen Court Records—on track to be published in May 2016.
2. Registers and Applications of Rations Issued—on track to be published in May 2016.
3. Labor Contracts, Indentures and Apprenticeship Records—anticipated publication in summer 2016.
4. Records of Persons and Articles Hired—anticipated publication in summer 2016.
5. Register of Claims, Pensions, and Bounty Claims, [Part C]—anticipated publication in summer 2016.

With these five record sets, a total of 7 of the 13 record sets have been indexed by our all-volunteer workforce and are already published or are or about to be published. Once published and searchable, these records will open long-awaited floodgates for African American genealogy.

Six record sets remain in various stages of indexing and arbitration and are active in the FamilySearch indexing program. Hopefully, the image below is familiar to you because you have indexed batches.  (see original post for images)

WE STILL NEED YOUR HELP! If the three highlighted record sets (education records, land and property records, and records of complaints) are not worked on right now, they will keep us from reaching our goal of completing this project by Juneteenth. We’ve come so far and don’t want anything to hold us back from making ALL the records from this poignant time in history searchable and part of our gift to NMAAHC.

As we hit the home stretch, we invite you to focus on these three projects for the next few weeks. These projects may be more difficult than what you’ve encountered before. But by now you are comfortable enough with the project and various record types that if you were to spend one hour this week and complete one or two batches, you’d help us make significant progress to our goal (and you can always do more than one or two batches if you’d like). By going through the process outlined on DiscoverFreedmen.org, you can also invite others to get started on any of the record sets, especially if they haven’t indexed before.

Thank you for your continued support. We are eager to celebrate the completion of the indexing portion of this project by Juneteenth to allow us to deliver all published records online and to the Smithsonian by September 24.
Another milestone has been reached in efforts to complete the Freedmen’s Bureau Project. We’d like to provide an update on the progress of the project and let you know where we are in t...
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