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FamilySearch: The Almost-Immortal Jeanne Calment
Jeanne Louise Calment was born 21 February 1875 in Arles, France. She lived a remarkably full life and remained vibrant to the end, passing away on 4 August 1997 at the incredible age of 122 years, 164 days! Her entire lifespan is well documented with census and other records, and she is the only human in history verified to have lived 120 or more years.

Jeanne was treasured in her hometown of Arles, where she lived her entire life. After she died the deputy mayor of Arles, Michel Vauzelle, commented in her obituary:

“She was the living memory of our city. Her birthdays were a sort of family holiday, where all the people of Arles gathered around their big sister.”

As recounted in her obituary, Jeanne met Vincent van Gogh when selling art supplies to him at her father’s shop in 1888. She described him as “dirty, badly dressed, and disagreeable.” More than a century later, she made a brief appearance in the 1990 film Vincent and Me – becoming, at the age of 114, the oldest person to ever appear in a movie.

Jeanne didn’t have to change her last named when she married Fernand Nicolas Calment, her double cousin. According to Wikipedia, this situation occurred because their paternal grandfathers were brothers and their paternal grandmothers were also sisters, making them cousins on both sides.

Longevity ran in her family. Her father, Nicolas Calment (1838-1931) died just six day shy of 93; her mother, Marguerite Gilles (1838-1924) lived to be 86; and her brother, Francois Calment (1865-1962) lived to be 97.

However, the longevity ended with Jeanne. She and her husband Fernand had one daughter, Yvonne, who died at the age of 35 of pneumonia leaving behind a young son, Frederic. Jeanne raised the little boy and he became a doctor before dying at age 36 in a car accident in 1963. Her husband had died back in 1942, so Frederic’s death left Jeanne entirely without family.

In 1965, at the ripe old age of 90, Jeanne sold her apartment. The buyer, Andre-Francois Raffray, must have thought he was making a great deal by purchasing it on contingency. Instead of paying the full amount upfront, he agreed to pay the elderly woman 2,500 francs per month until she died. But it was more of a gamble than he anticipated! After paying her faithfully for 30 years he died first, in 1995, and then his widow continued making the payments until Jeanne died in 1997.

Throughout Jeanne’s life, she remained positive. On the occasion of her 116th birthday, she stated:

“I think I’ll probably die laughing.”

Two years later, on her 118th birthday, this headline writer dryly noted “She’s in her very, very late teens.” The article reports that “Her doctors say her memory and sense of humor remain keen.”

As she continued aging, reporters kept asking Jeanne about her remarkable longevity. As her obituary reports:

“Every year on her birthday, Feb. 21, she regaled reporters with quips about her secret of longevity – the list changed every year and included laughter, activity and ‘a stomach like an ostrich’s.’ Her most memorable explanation was that ‘God must have forgotten me.’”

When she died, the town of Arles mourned. As her obituary reports:

“In Arles, the flag at city hall was at half-staff Monday. Groups of people lingered in the streets to chat about Calment’s life and death.

“‘We ended up believing she was immortal,’ said Felix Ramadier, a retired worker.

“‘It’s a bit of our heritage that went away today,’ baker Andre Pons said.”

What are you doing today to keep your recollections of the past alive for future generations?

Sources:

* GenealogyBank.com, Register Star (Rockford, Illinois), 22 February 1993, page 3.
* GenealogyBank.com, Register Star (Rockford, Illinois), 5 August 1997, page 6.
* GenealogyBank.com, Boston Herald (Boston, Massachusetts), 22 February 1991, page 12.

#genealogy   #familysearch   #obituary   #genealogybank  
Jeanne Louise Calment was born 21 February 1875 in Arles, France. She lived a remarkably full life and remained vibrant to the end, passing away on 4 August 1997 at the incredible age of 122 years,...
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FamilySearch: The Family History Library Announces Free Classes—May, 2015

During the month of May, the Family History Library will be hosting a number of free online family history classes and webinars. These classes and webinars are designed to help individuals and families find their ancestors and teach important family history techniques. They are free to the public. Information about specific classes is listed below, as well as information on how to register for classes.

May 2: Búsquedas eficaces Webinar —This is a class for Spanish speaking guests. This webinar begins at 1:00 p.m.

May 7: FamilySearch Catalog Webinar —This webinar begins at 1o:00 a.m.

May 7: Danish Church Records: Extracting Genealogical Information: Part 2 Webinar —This webinar begins at 7:00 p.m.

May 12: German Research Series —Classes include: “How to Research in German Archives,” “German Research: Hamburg Passenger Lists,” and “Using the German and Poland Online Gazetteer Kartenmeister.” This series of classes go from 10:00 A.M. to 1:00 p.m.

May 12: Using the Digitized Records of Various Polish State Archives Webinar —This webinar begins at 7:00 p.m.

May 14: Family History Library Catalog Webinar —This webinar begins at 6:00 p.m.

May 16: Boy Scout Genealogy Merit Badge —Register for this 90-minute class at least one week prior to the workshop to find out which requirements should be completed before attending. For registration information, call 1-801-240-4673. This workshop begins at 10:00 a.m.

May 16: Metodología: Un caso de estudio Webinar —This class will be taught in Spanish only. This webinar begins at 1:00 p.m.

May 18-22: Scotland Research Series Webinars —Classes include: Scotland Emigration, Scotland Probate Records, Scotland Poor Law Records, Scotland Land Records, and Scotland Naming Patterns and Clans. This series of webinars will be held Monday through Friday at 1:00 p.m.

May 20: Norwegian Emigration Webinar —This webinar begins at 7:00 p.m.

May 21: Norwegian Census Records Webinar —This webinar begins at 12:00 noon.

May 23: Reading Gothic Handwriting in Swedish Records (2 hours). —This class begins at 10:00 a.m.

May 28: Using Canadian Census Records Webinar —This webinar begins at 7:00 p.m.

May 30: British Research Series. Classes include: British Resources on findmypast.com, and British Resources on MyHeritage.com.—Class go from 9:15–11:300 a.m.

May 30: FamilySearch.org Research Series. Classes include, Using the FamilySearch Historical Records Collection and Your Best Friends: The Wiki and the FamilySearch Catalog. Classes go from 9:45 a.m. to 12:00 noon.

May 30: French Research Series. Classes include, Basic French Research and Reading French Church and Civil Records. Classes go from 10:15 A.M. to 12:15 p.m.

Instructions for attending webinars can be viewed by going to FamilySearch.org. Click the Search link. Select Wiki. Type Family History Library in the search field and click the top entry (Family History Library). Click link 2.2 (Live Online Classes) for details. Scroll to find the desired date and class and click on the link to get information about attending the class or webinar online.

#genealogy   #familysearch   #familysearchlibrary   #training  
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FamilySearch Indexing Announces First Worldwide Arbitration Event

More than six million indexed images containing valuable genealogical information are waiting to be arbitrated (reviewed and corrected) before they can be published and made available to family history researchers on FamilySearch.org. Eliminating this backlog of needed records is the object of the first online Worldwide Arbitration Event sponsored by FamilySearch Indexing and scheduled for May 1-8, 2015.

Volunteer arbitrators worldwide, and FamilySearch indexers who are qualified and willing to become arbitrators, are being called upon to help arbitrate the images which were previously indexed (transcribed) by indexing volunteers. In the FamilySearch indexing system, historical records are indexed by two different volunteers, then an experienced indexer known as an arbitrator reviews and corrects any discrepancies between the two indexers’ work. Only then can records be published for researchers on FamilySearch.org.

“Indexers far outnumber arbitrators, which creates an imbalance in the work and a backlog of records waiting to be arbitrated” said Mike Judson, FamilySearch indexing workforce development manager. “This event will not only help to reduce the backlog, but will make it possible to publish millions more searchable records so others can find their ancestors.”

FamilySearch indexers and arbitrators make it possible for FamilySearch.org to publish an average of 1.3 million freely searchable records containing more than three million names each day. An estimated 19.5 million names are contained in the current backlog of records awaiting arbitration.

Qualified Indexers Invited to Become Arbitrators

All indexers who have indexed at least 4,000 records are eligible to become arbitrators. Qualifying indexers who would like to participate as arbitrators should visit https://FamilySearch.org/indexing/help to learn how to get started.

Following four essential tips will ensure volunteers are ready to submit high-quality arbitrated records during the Worldwide Arbitration Event:

* Read the instructions. Read or re-read the field helps and project instructions for each arbitration project before beginning.
* Record match. Record matching ensures that arbitrators use a correct and fair comparison between the information recorded by indexer A and indexer B. For instructions, watch the video: “Arbitration Training – Record Matching,” which teaches how to complete this essential step in the indexing process.
* If possible, volunteers should index one or more batches from each project they plan to arbitrate during the event, then continue to index one batch for every ten they arbitrate. Indexing (and reviewing the instructions) will help arbitrators stay sharp.
* Arbitrate in native language. Accuracy is highest when volunteers work only in their native language. Unless they have received extensive training in a second language and are highly proficient in that language, or have been specifically trained to index certain types of records in a second language, volunteers should stick with projects in their native language.

For additional information, volunteers can visit https://FamilySearch.org/indexing/help.

#genealogy   #familysearch  #indexing
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FamilySearch: Go Fish! Engaging Younger Family Members Through Family Games

One of the new and inviting ways that families are successfully engaging younger family members is with family history games. Some parents prepare the games and host a family game night at home. These games encourage younger kids to learn about their ancestors and to share that experience with their family.

Getting to Know You Card Game —A set of cards are created, where one side of the card has a photo of a family ancestor, and the other side of the card tells a story about the person’s life. Attributes worth emulating or significant events in the person’s life can be identified. Players take turns asking, “Do you have a person who has (fill in the attribute)? If not, ‘Go Fish.’”

Matching Game —Two identical cards are created using photos of family members, former homes, or other items of significance to the family and posted on card stock squares. My grandchildren’s favorite card is a great-grandmother whose favorite meal was bushy-tail squirrel! On the opposite side of the cards, the items are numbered. Players pick two numbers and try to locate matches. The significance of the items selected is discussed as the game is played.

Bingo —A card is developed with 9, 16, or 25 squares on it. Questions are listed in each square. Family members who can answer the question can place a coin or a button on the square. For example, you might ask, name an ancestor who invented a new kind of trashing machine; tell the name of your maternal grandmother, where was your grandfather was born, tell me the profession of one of your great-grandparents, etc.

Jeopardy —Answers to ancestor questions are printed on card stock. Pick categories for each answer and assign extra points for more difficult questions. Players chose a category and how difficult an answer they desire to pick. Responses are made in the form of a question (since you already have the answer on the card).

One extended family studied family stories and photos before the cousins all got together. Games were played and each child was able to show just how much they knew about their ancestors. Family night or family get togethers are a perfect time to share these games with family members. Sometimes families need support to accomplish projects like these family history games. As a parent, you can prepare materials and help other family members research stories, photos, and documents about their ancestors. Learning to find ancestors and sharing that process with other family members is a natural extension of family game night. Game night is a fun and entertaining way to engage members of all ages in family history.

#genealogy   #familysearch  
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Randall Wiemer's profile photoMichelle Etter's profile photo
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No family... but my two boys... please if u got the fam. Take advantage of that! i just dont know them!
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FamilySearch: Searching for Willard: ‘Houston, We Have a Problem’

In researching for Willard O. Hyatt I quickly found the entry below for his tombstone. Great – that is my target, Willard O. Hyatt. He was born in Burlington, Calhoun County, Michigan, and I knew that he died there. I could see by his tombstone that he died in 1934. Armed with this initial information it was time to dig deeper.

By pulling his entries in the census, his death certificate and other records, we can begin to piece together the facts of his life.

I next found his death certificate.

Hmm…“Houston, we have a problem.”

His date of death in the death certificate is not agreeing with the date carved on his tombstone.

I looked in the old newspapers in GenealogyBank.com to see if I could find out more about this discrepancy – and uncovered an unusual story.

This article in the Heraldo de Brownsville newspaper gives us the rest of his story, telling us why he decided to commission his own gravestone so many years before his death – and why it has the wrong date.

Willard calculated that since both of his parents – Thomas Hyatt (1806-1887) and Mary Ann (Odell) Hyatt (1811-1891) – died at age 80, he too would die at 80 years of age.

So in 1906 – 18 years before his projected date of death – he bought a tombstone and had the carver entered his life dates as he expected them to be: 1854-1934, when he would be 80 years old.

But as things turned out, it was another 10 years before Willard passed away – on the 28th of October 1944.

Genealogy Tip: Dig deep and find every supporting document. Go beyond census and vital records. Be sure to search the old newspapers – that’s where the stories of our ancestors are.

Sources:

* FamilySearch – partner site Find-a-Grave
* FamilySearch, Michigan, Death Certificates, 1921-1952
* GenealogyBank.com, Heraldo de Brownsville (Brownsville, Texas), 4 November 1937, page 9.

Thomas Jay Kemp is the Director of Genealogy Products at GenealogyBank. Tom is an internationally known librarian and archivist. He is the author of over 35 genealogy books and hundreds of articles about genealogy and family history. An active genealogist, he has been working on his own family history for over 50 years.

Tom previously served as the Chair of the National Council of Library & Information Associations (Washington, D.C.) and as Library Director of both the Historical Society of Pennsylvania and the New England Historic Genealogical Society.

#genealogy   #familysearch  #find-a-grave #genealogybank  
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FamilySearch: #RootsTech2015 Video Interviews by Jill Ball

Jill Ball runs the popular blog GeniAus. As an official RootsTech Ambassador, she had the chance to interview individuals at RootsTech 2015 in Salt Lake City. Several of her videos are already available on YouTube. She interviewed D Joshua Taylor, The Indepth-Genealogists Terri, Jennifer, and Shannon, first-timers from Australia and Wales, and Jill shared her experiences from the RootsTech Media Dinner and Society Day. Stay tuned for upcoming interviews that will be posted on her YouTube channel with Curt Witcher, Cyndi Ingle, Judy Russell, and members of the Australian Society of Genealogists. The interviews cover a wide range of topics of interest to our readers. Enjoy!

See the original post below for the videos.

#genealogy   #familysearch   #rootstech  
Jill Ball runs the popular blog GeniAus. As an official RootsTech Ambassador, she had the chance to interview individuals at RootsTech 2015 in Salt Lake City. Several of her videos are already avai...
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FamilySearch: 3 Powerful Ways Obituaries Can Help You Expand Your Family Tree

“The venerable John Adams, late President of the United States, one of the ablest and most efficient advocates and supporters of the Revolution, an original signer of the Declaration of Independence, a patriot and statesman, whose career was full of honor, whose life, services, talents, and virtues were the pride and glory of the nation, expired at his residence in Quincy, Mass. on the 4th day of July, at the advanced age of 92.”

This famous opening to the obituary of John Adams in the New-York Statesman captures the life, accomplishments, and spirit of an American Founding Father. His status as a patriot who served his nation is celebrated, his impact on history canonized.

Obituaries often eloquently summarize the lives and times of those who pass, the words serving as testament to how people are remembered by family and friends.

In addition to memorializing the spirit of ancestors, obituaries are fertile sources of genealogical information. A simple obituary search can yield important clues that illuminate the lives of kin.

We asked genealogists for the most powerful ways they expand their family trees. They told us obituaries are one of the most significant resources to discover new genealogical lines and fill in details about little-known ancestors.

Use their suggestions to help power your family tree and collect richer family histories!

Open up new branches of your family tree

“Genealogists know that obituaries can significantly enrich the family tree and help it grow,” says Randy Seaver, founder of Genea-Musings. He notes that obituaries can be excellent sources of information about the deceased person’s spouse, parents, siblings, children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren. “All of these names can add content to the family tree.”

Randy was able to use an obituary to learn about the life and family of his second great grandfather, David Auble, who was born in 1817. Not much was known of David or his family before Randy found an 1894 death notice printed in a Terre Haute, Indiana, newspaper. Randy explains, “David’s obituary provided much more information about his life as well as his siblings’ names, his wife and her siblings, and his children’s names and residences.”

Randy observes that knowing the residences of still-living relatives, often provided in obituaries, can open up additional genealogical opportunities. “Contacting descendants of the deceased via telephone, email, or personal letter may result in more information about the family,” he says.

Look to open up new branches of your family tree with the help of an obituary search. In addition to recording names, use notices to gather birth, marriage, and death dates of ancestors.

Account for difficult-to-track family settlements and migrations

Beyond helping to discover new family lines, obituaries can allow you to track scarcely documented migrations of ancestors and better understand how they came to settle in a given place. Such was the case for Lisa Louise Cooke, founder of Genealogy Gems.

“When I was a little girl, my grandma told me a story,” Lisa says. “She said that after her family immigrated in 1910, they moved to Gillespie, Illinois, where my great grandfather, Gus Sporan (Sporowski), went to work in the coal mines. The goal was to earn enough money to buy a ranch out west.”

When the Sporans had saved enough money, Lisa explains, they were hit with a devastating setback: “The family purchased a ranch from a traveling real estate salesman and moved to California, only to discover that they had been swindled, and were left with nothing.”

Gus went to work at a ranch near Chowchilla, California, with his wife, Louise, working as a cook. Where the farm was, though, Lisa’s grandmother didn’t know.

“Decades later,” Lisa says, “I discovered Gus Sporan’s obituary on the front page of the Chowchilla weekly newspaper. This obituary is the only evidence I have ever found to verify the story Grandma told me. It has since led to a wealth of information and even a visit to what is now the Lazy K Ranch in LeGrand, California.”

Begin filling in the details of family settlements and migrations with an obituary search. Use obituaries to piece together how and why ancestors settled in a particular place.

Gain clarity around ambiguous census records

Sunny McClellan Morton, contributing editor at Family Tree Magazine, recommends obituaries as means to overcome ambiguous census documents – just as she did.

“It’s usually not difficult to find the parents of a U.S. resident who was born in 1923 and listed in the 1930 and 1940 censuses with a family,” Sunny says. “But my ancestor Jesse Dorton was listed both times (at age 7 and age 16) as a lodger.”

Why was Jesse considered a lodger, rather than a child of the family? Sunny didn’t know.

“There were a few Dorton couples living in the area who were of age to be his parents,” she explains, “but I had no evidence to hook them together. I was stumped – until I found Jesse’s obituary online.”

Sunny used the long list of names in Jesse’s obituary to reconstruct both of his father’s marriages and push the tree back another couple of generations. This information ultimately helped her  understand the circumstances under which Jesse had been a lodger: “I learned that the Sheldon couple who raised Jesse as a ‘lodger’ were neighbors of his parents.”

“Obituaries often tell you much more than about the end of that person’s life,” Sunny observes. “In this case, an obituary helped me understand his beginnings.”

Use an obituary search to make sense of hard-to-decipher census documentation about people in your family tree, including those whose beginnings are unknown to you.

Get Started!

Now it’s your turn to expand your family tree. Start with an obituary search of known relatives, and see where the stories of your ancestors take you! Obituaries can be among the most powerful ways to open up new branches of your family tree and illuminate an ancestor’s life.

#genealogy   #familysearch   #obituary   #obtuaries  
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Tracy place natchitoches parish
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Lineage Keeper

Research Training Courses  - 
 
FamilySearch: April, 2015—Teach Yourself and Others: New Online Training Now Available

Several new classes have been added to the FamilySearch Learning Center. These new classes include:

* Selected Video from RootsTech 2015 Conference
* How to Use Family Tree
* Using FamilySearch
* German Research Help Classes

RootsTech 2015

* RootsTech 2015 Videos

Family Tree

* How To Add Photos to Your Family Tree
* How To Find Your Ancestors In Your Family Tree
* How To Navigate the Family Tree Tool Overview
* When your “Family Tree” is empty!

FamilySearch

* FamilySearch Memories

German Research Helps

* Der Genealoge

* Die Deutsche Schrift!

See original post below for the links to the training courses:

#genealogy   #familysearch   #training  
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I'm starting to wonder if there's any groups online besides my forums and the big one on Facebook that I won't join that talk about indexing?
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FamilySearch: FamilySearch Adds More Than 2.3 Million Indexed Records and Images for the Czech Republic, Mexico, New Zealand, Ukraine, and the United States

FamilySearch has added to its collections more than 2.3 million indexed records and images for the Czech Republic, Mexico, New Zealand, Ukraine, and the United States. Notable collection updates include 771,097 images from the New Zealand, Archives New Zealand, Probate Records, 1843–1998 collection; 417,808 indexed records and 417,808 images from the US, BillionGraves Index collection; and 411,325 indexed records from the Mexico, San Luis Potosí, Civil Registration, 1859–2000 collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

See the original post below for the links to the collections:

#genealogy   #familysearch   #collections  
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News and tips about FamilySearch its collections, resources and applications. Please select the category before you add a posting.
 
FamilySearch: Preservation Week—Helping Us Keep the Memories of Our Life Alive

One hundred years from now, what will our great grandchildren know about us? For most, it won’t be much. If we are lucky, there may be a handful of old photographs and a few stories, many of which may not be all that accurate. Unless we do something to identify and preserve the artifacts that tell the story of who we are, we will be forgotten. It’s that simple.

Preservation week, April 27-May 2, is a national event hosted by the American Library Association (ALA). It is the goal of the ALA to remind us all how important our own personal artifacts are. They tell the story of our lives and provide a means for future generations to know who we are and connect with us.

At FamilySearch we encourage the preserving and sharing of individual and family memories through the preservation of photographs, personal histories, movies, oral histories and other artifacts that tell the story of our families and our individual lives.

Protect your own personal and family artifacts by following these tips shared by LDS Church History conservator, Chris McAfee.

Protect your collections.

Store items in a dark, cool, dry area. Avoid contact with sunlight and fluorescent lighting, high temperatures, and areas where water may be a concern (such as near or below plumbing lines, water heaters, etc.). If possible, try to avoid extreme changes in temperature and humidity. If you and your family have items of great historical value, you may want to consider donating them to a reputable institution like a local historical society, a museum, or a university archive.

Store Items in secure storage containers.

Boxes, folders, plastic sleeves, etc. are excellent storage containers if they are made from archival materials. Direct contact with non-archival materials can be harmful to documents. Boxes, folders, and other paper containers should be acid and lignin free. Plastic sleeves should be polyester, polyethylene, or polypropylene. Never use vinyl or acetate. Archival containers will protect items from dust and other contaminants and will also help maintain a more stable environment for your important items. Archival items can be purchase online and something are available at local office supply stores.

Remove objects from your books, papers and photographs.

Newspaper clippings, pressed flowers, paper clips, rubber bands, and other objects will sooner or late damage historical items. If you have one or more of these items and they are related to the artifact, remove it and store it separately with the artifact it came from.

Newspapers are highly acidic so remove them immediately. Photocopy newspaper clippings onto acid free paper. Most copy centers now have acid free paper readily available and costs only a penny a copy more. Acid free is generally considered safe for 300 to 500 years. You may also want to scan valuable paper items and story them digitally.

Digital storage devices have a limited life expectancy.

At the present time most computer storage devices are expected to be reliable for only about 10 years. After 5 years, it may be a good idea to do a yearly review of the contents on your storage device. You don’t have to check everything but do a random review and see if there are problems. If you start getting error random messages or if only parts of your document opens, it’s time to transfer everything onto a new storage device. After 10 years you may want to transfer everything over to a new storage device so that you will be good for another 10 years.

Another great way to make sure your data is safe is to share it with others. The more a document or photograph is spread among family and friends, the greater the chances of it surviving a disaster and permanent loss.

Avoid doing anything irreversible to your documents and photographs.

Never use white glue, rubber cement, super glue or cellophane and other pressure sensitive tapes on documents or photographs. Do not laminate items you want to save. Do not use photo albums that involve any glue or self-stick adhesives. To attach photos to a page, use photo corners instead. Avoid writing on historical documents. If items must be marked, write lightly with a #2 pencil in an inconspicuous area such as on the back or in the margins. You could also write notes on a separate piece of paper (preferably acid free) and attach it to the original document or photograph.

Do not attempt to repair damage on your own.

If you see damage such as tears, breaks, discoloration, etc. consult a professional conservator. Most local colleges or university libraries have a conservator that can give you advice on how and where to have repairs done.

It may require some effort to follow these guidelines. Even though we don’t engrave the historical events of our lives on metal plates, preserving our own historical records still requires work on our part. But as we do the work necessary to preserve and protect our personal records we can, as Jacob did, rejoice in knowing the joy our descendants will find in learning more about us.

What can you do to preserve your stories, photos and other history records? You can go to FamilySearch.org and add your photos and stories to your branch of the Family Tree. By adding your important historical records to FamilySearch, you can be sure that your posterity, for generations to come, will know who you were and will enjoy learning more about you.

#genealogy   #familysearch   #digital   #photographs   #digitalpreservation  
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FamilySearch continually tests and adopts the best long term storage methods available.  The testing assures media stability and duration not fad.  All of the data, images, etc., are stored in the granite mountain vaults in the mountains southeast of Salt Lake City.
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FamilySearch: Clean up Your Grimy Old Photos

Have you ever gone through your old stuff and found some old dirty damaged pictures you forgot you had? Now, there is help for that problem.

Denise May Levenick offers detailed instructions on how to reclaim your family photos from the damages of poor storage, frames, or albums. Levenick teaches preservation techniques for your old, damaged photos.

Levenick is a lecturer and blogger who can help you recover and preserve priceless family photographs. According to Levenick, the starting point for this process is: do no harm. Know what you are doing before you start.

Next, make sure what you have is preserved by making a digital image of the picture you are going to work on. That way, if all else fails, you still have a record of the original image.

Levenick advises you to handle your old photos as little as possible. Use your digital camera or your smart phone to make the digital photo, using a tripod, a remote shutter or timer, and no flash. You can also use a flatbed scanner. If you don’t have a scanner of your own you can use some excellent quality scanners for free at you a Family History Centers throughout the world. You can find a Family History Center closest to you by visiting the FamilySearch.

There are many reasons pictures suffer damage, according to Levenick. So-called magnetic albums used materials that were not acid free and accelerate deterioration. Photos got rolled or curled. Improper framing can cause stained or damaged photos.

Photos that may appear hopelessly damaged may be recovered using hints from Levenick’s blog page, Dirty Family Photos: Save Your Pictures from Ruin. Levenick also provides suggestions for tools and materials for repairing a range of damages to your family photos.

Rather than risking damage to your posthumous reputation when future generations look through your old damaged pictures, get some good advice on how to restore and protect them at www.theFamilyCurator.com. Those old photos may not be replaceable but they can be revived.

#genealogy   #familysearch   #photos  
Have you ever gone through your old stuff and found some old dirty damaged pictures you forgot you had? Now, there is help for that problem. Denise May Levenick offers detailed instructions on how ...
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FamilySearch Adds More Than 4 Million Indexed Records and Images for Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, England, Italy, South Africa, and the United States

FamilySearch has added to its collections more than 4 million indexed records and images for Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, England, Italy, South Africa, and the United States. Notable collection updates include 700,220 indexed records from the US, Alabama, County Marriages, 1809–1950 collection; 461,167 indexed records from the US, Montana, Cascade County Records, 1880–2009 collection; and 380,334 indexed records from the Brazil, São Paulo, Immigration Cards, 1902–1980 collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

See the original post below for the full list of new collections and their related links on FamilySearch:

#genealogy   #familysearch   #collections  
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Patricia  McLaughlin 's profile photoAmy W. Kelly's profile photo
 
Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
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FamilySearch: Finding Erwin

When I grew up, my maternal grandmother often talked about her younger brother, Erwin. He was born only a few years before World War I, so in his early childhood years during the war, he suffered immensely from the lack of food. Even though my grandmother shared her meager portion with him, he suffered severely from malnutrition. When he developed a kidney infection a few years later, his body was not resilient enough to fight the disease, and he passed away as a very young man.

My grandmother never overcame his passing. Even in her 90s, her eyes filled with tears when she talked about her younger brother—and so did mine. Growing up in a home where there was always plenty of everything, I simply could not imagine what it was like to be hungry and undernourished. How I wished I could have shared some of my plenty with Erwin or could simply do something for that hungry little boy.

As a young woman, I started to work on my family tree. For my father’s side of the family, research was very easy because of well-kept family records. For my mother’s side, however, research became very difficult because my grandmother’s house had been bombed during World War II. The family had lost all of their possessions, including their family records. I was able to identify the names of my grandmother’s parents, but there was no information on their children, including Erwin. Living a busy life like almost everybody today, I postponed further research to some later time in life.

Then, a few months ago, I was asked to help German stake indexing directors. I realized that I needed to increase my knowledge about the process of finding records and teaching others how to use them. A colleague sent me the link to a website called Ancestry.de which provides access to many useful German record collections. Experimenting with the website, I searched for Erwin’s name, and there was one exact hit—his death record. I searched for his parents, and again, there was one exact hit—his parent’s marriage license, which included the names of their parents, my great-great-grandparents for whom, so far, I had no information. Within seconds, I had found five new names for my family tree.

I could not believe this success—I had not asked for help with my own tree or with my own research. The only thing I had asked to do was to learn how to find information in Germany so I could teach others how to do it. I never imagined that this simple request would trigger events that would so quickly and easily lead me to the names of five ancestors that I could add to my own tree. I was totally overwhelmed.

Because of this experience, I am convinced that if we will just make the effort to begin searching for an ancestor then great things could possibly happen and we may experience results in a way that are beyond our imagination.

I can hardly wait to share this information about Erwin with other family members. Finally, after so many years, there is something I can do for a hungry little boy whose story touched me so deeply when I was a young girl. I can share his story and help ensure that the memory of this little boy stays alive.

#genealogy   #familysearch  
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Wayne Blankenbiller's profile photoAmy W. Kelly's profile photo Valerie Chance's profile photo
 
A great story to inspire us all to keep up the work we love so much.
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FamilySearch: Free Historic Book Collection Online Hits 200,000th Milestone

Imagine a free virtual online library of rare historic books from all over the world to help you discover rich, unknown details about the lives of your ancestors. What if the historic book collections held by significant public libraries and venerable societies were the sources of these contributed books? You’d have a dynamic, priceless online repository of some of the greatest hidden historic treasures predominantly unknown to man. International, and a growing host of partnering libraries and organizations and volunteers, have announced today that they’ve reached the milestone of publishing 200,000 historic volumes online for free at books.FamilySearch.org. The growing online collection, which began in 2007, is invaluable to genealogists and family historians in finding their ancestors.

FamilySearch has mobile digitization pods at partnering libraries and organizations across the United States including Fort Wayne (Indiana), Syracuse (New York), Philadelphia (Pennsylvania), Independence (Missouri), Houston (Texas), at the University of Florida, and in Salt Lake City (Utah). Digitization is also being done at strategic FamilySearch Centers in Pocatello (Idaho), Mesa (Arizona), Oakland, Orange and Sacramento (California), and in Utah at the West Valley and Ogden Centers. . Most of the digitized publications consists of compiled family histories and local and county histories. The collection also includes telephone and postal directories and other resources.

A major player in this vast project is the Allen County (Indiana) Public Library. Allen County’s genealogical library is the second largest genealogical library in the world containing one million physical items and 2.5 million searchable items in their free online databases. FamilySearch has three sets of volunteers filming at the Library’s Genealogy Center. Over the five year project some 14,000 volumes have been filmed and digitized (translating to an estimated two million pages). Allen County has an estimated 12,000 more volumes that are immediately available for digitization—perhaps another five years of work.

Curt Witcher, Allen County Library’s Genealogy Center Manager, credits FamilySearch. “They’ve done a lot of the heavy lifting” in getting the project to this point. “Think of the collection that every library in the world now has accessible through this project. And there is no loss, no theft, no mutilation of materials.”

Houston Public Library (HPL) is regularly ranked among the top ten genealogical libraries. It joined the initiative in 2008. Sporting an extensive Gulf Coast family history and genealogical collection, as well as an extensive international collection, HPL’s Clayton Library Center for Genealogical Research and the Houston Metropolitan Research Center has contributed, so far, nearly 8,700 volumes to the FamilySearch project. Sue Kaufman, Manager of the Clayton Center, is quick to say what a pleasure it is to watch library-goers expand their research by being able to simply entering name, date and place data to quickly search personal histories and stories from the digitized collection online.

The project has made books available to anyone with an Internet connection. And even though the historic books are becoming available online, foot traffic has not decreased while the use of the family history content its online delivery has increased.

Like most of the digitization pods for this initiative, the digitization work at the Clayton Center is performed by full-time FamilySearch volunteers, although some locations are supported by local volunteers. Kaufman says, “I am humbled and honored to be part of this project. It is amazing what the FamilySearch volunteers do, closing their homes for 12 or 18 months to work 40 hours a week in a space that must seem the size of a closet. It is selfless. We couldn’t have done it ourselves.”

At the Historical Society of Pennsylvania (HSP), a unique, special collections library in the heart of Philadelphia, digitization efforts have been equally successful. According to Page Talbott, HSP President and CEO, they are planning to digitize 3,100 volumes of the Historical Society’s 12,000 volume family history collection. To-date over 110,000 pages (about 800 volumes) have been completed. Talbot characterizes the digitization initiative with FamilySearch as “fabulous” and sees vast potential for future projects.

HSP was established in 1824 and has 21 million manuscripts and 600,000 bound volumes. In addition to the family history collection, it holds collections of vital records, directories, business histories, and prison records. HSP collects histories of all states from the east coast to the Mississippi River, including ethnic and immigrant histories, and has collected historical newspapers in 57 languages.

To search the digitized records go to books.familysearch.org, enter your ancestor’s name into the search box and click “search.” Libraries or organizations interested in participating in the book digitization initiative can contact Dennis Meldrum, project manager, at meldrumdl@familysearch.org.

#genealogy   #familysearch  #digital #books
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Jody Lutter's profile photo
 
I'm getting too many hits. Anyone have tips for narrowing results?
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Does anyone know when FamilySearch is back working again?  Internal Service Error...
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Dave Robison's profile photoKristy Rhodes's profile photo
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Yip, it's working now.  It was down for about an hour or so.  Glad it's back now!
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Library of FamilySearch Indexing Information » All Boards » English Projects - Being Indexed » US, Ohio, Summit County - Veteran Burial Cards, 1700 - 1941 » Special Instructions for determining years
http://www.lofsii.com/index.php?topic=2759.0

Special instructions for this project:
If only the last two digits were given for the year of birth or death, you can often determine the first two digits from the name of the war that was usually included on the card.  Click here and  here to see some examples of how to determine the birth and death years.
The following is a list of wars with their corresponding dates:
Indian Wars: 1622–1924
Revolutionary War: 1775–1783
Civil War: 1861–1865
Mexican (or Mexican–American) War: 1846–1848
Spanish (or Spanish–American) War: 1898
World War: 1914–1918

In other words, in this project you are not only allowed but supposed to use outside sources of information (i.e. historical dates of the wars) to help you interpret the information on the cards. This is unique and should not necessarily be applied to other projects.
Special Instructions for determining years
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Library of FamilySearch Indexing Information » All Boards » English Projects - Being Indexed » US, Ohio, Summit County - Veteran Burial Cards, 1700 - 1941 » Main Links for Project

http://www.lofsii.com/index.php?topic=2758.0
Main Links for Project
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Familysearch: #RootsTech2015 Video Interviews by Rosemary Morgan

Rosemary Morgan runs the popular blog London Roots Research. As an official RootsTech Ambassador, she had the chance to interview individuals at RootsTech 2015 in Salt Lake City. Several of her videos are now available on YouTube. She interviewed Angie Bush, Myko Clelland, Paul Howes, Tessa Keough, Tahitia McCabe, and CeCe Moore. The interviews cover a wide range of topics of interest to our readers. Enjoy!

#genealogy   #familysearch   #rootstech  
Rosemary Morgan runs the popular blog London Roots Research. As an official RootsTech Ambassador, she had the chance to interview individuals at RootsTech 2015 in Salt Lake City. Several of her vid...
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FamilySearch: My Grandmother’s Table

I’d like to tell you about my mother’s mother, Chloe Louise Layton Harris. Of course, I always knew her just as “Grandma.” My father’s mother died many years before I was born, so Chloe was the only grandmother I really knew well. Many of my memories of her are centered in her kitchen and especially on the things that happened on and around her kitchen table.

One story I heard from my brother took place when he and two of our cousins were of the age to have their tonsils removed. Out-patient surgery was really in-house surgery, which meant that the cousins and their mothers gathered at Grandma’s house, and each child took his or her turn on Grandma’s kitchen table having his or her tonsils removed! The local country doctor took care of the surgery. Grandma and her daughters were the post-operative nurses! Everyone survived and lived long lives without their tonsils.

I also heard stories that during the harvest season Grandma would feed teams of men hired to help with the grain harvest. Around her table, she fed her own seven children, her husband, and these many men who came to the farm to put in long hours of labor. I am sure they had tremendous appetites. Preparing nearly all the food from items grown on the farm and then cooking on a wood or coal-fired stove required skill and organization that is hard to comprehend. When Grandma fed hired hands, she was up early enough to bake a dozen loaves of bread before the crew came to her kitchen for lunch. This preparation entailed grinding the wheat, mixing the bread, firing up the stove, and baking the bread. She did all this work while she was preparing everything else that was needed for the meal! It is an amazing accomplishment from my modern-day viewpoint.

My Uncle Brian’s family posted his personal history on Family Tree. Uncle Brian told that during the Great Depression, the family could not sell their wheat for what it cost to grow. Instead, they fitted a special grate in the kitchen stove to burn wheat instead of coal. Other wheat was fed to hogs. Grandma served very little on her kitchen table that was not pork, potatoes, wheat cereal, milk, or homemade bread. Finding this story on Family Tree where I could read it helped me to love Grandma even more. She did whatever was necessary to care for her family in difficult times.

My days at Grandma’s table were filled with good food and good times. My favorite food I ate at Grandma’s table was fried eggs. Even my mother could not cook an egg that tasted as good as Grandma’s. I lived hundreds of miles away, but in the fall, my mother and I would go to Grandma’s house to help preserve peaches. My mother and her sisters would sit around Grandma’s table cutting, peeling, and bottling peaches for nearly a week. I would sit and listen to the stories and love shared around Grandma’s table. One year, I missed school to participate in the annual peach gathering. Between the bottles and peaches, Grandma listened to me read stories of Dick and Jane. When we left for home, my mother left with boxes of canned peaches. I left with confidence that I was the best 6-year-old reader in the world. Why not? My grandma said I was!

What memories do you have of your grandmother? Sharing your stories on Family Tree, as my Uncle Brian’s family did, can help your whole family as they grow in love and appreciation for their ancestors. Connect with your family. If you can, take time to attend the temple together. Honor your grandparents and other ancestors. Through taking the names of our grandparents and other ancestors to the temple, we extend to them our gratitude for the gift of life they gave us. Find out about your grandmothers, take their names to the temple, and share with your family the precious experiences you have doing this work of salvation for those you love so very much.

#genealogy   #familysearch  #familysearchblog
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