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No-till and pasture cropping are replacing the plow. Cover crops are becoming the primary source of fertility and disease suppression. Inter-crop and habitat strips are being used to attract parasitic and predator insects. Forage fed animals are more popular as a means to improve our health and increase stability in the face of climate change. Permaculture techniques are advancing soil preservation, carbon sinking and reliability in spite of widely fluctuating weather patterns. Super-foods are being grown more than ever before. But the key to all of these changes is to make the consumer aware of their importance so they can encourage these techniques.

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Direct seeding of trees that have deep tap roots is the best way to optimize their drought resistance and stability. Pre-sprouting and protection are required to increase success and prevent predation. Use on oak, pecan, hickory, walnut, chestnut, locust, Scots Pine, etc.
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https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/pubs/gtr/gtr-p-115papers/06farlee-p-115.pdf
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Trees are an important, stable source of food for bees and other pollinators providing thousands of flower heads all in one place. In this post you will find a list of great bee trees that indicates when the trees are in flower, what they offer the bees, i.e pollen, nectar or honey dew and whether and when the trees offer fruits, nuts or wildlife foods.


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I would like to introduce my website, information about growing plants, about caring, season of planting, blooming, harvest and much more information
http://www.growplants.org


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Hybrid Walnut - J. major X J. regia. An attempt to combine greater resistance to thousand canker disease with the flavor of the English / Persian walnut.

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Plant Breeding for Pest and Disease Resistance by G.E. Russel - Siberian / Russian / Mongolian Scots Pine varieties offer the most disease resistance.
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Also see: https://www.fs.fed.us/rm/pubs_rm/rm_rp114.pdf
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Check out our latest video Father and Son hive out a swarm with three queen bees!
Don't forget to subscribe to our channel! "Save them Bees"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iWfZ5mdZ4_k

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Some feel that soybeans tolerant to dicamba or 2,4-D will solve the problem, but it seems that those two compounds are becoming ineffective at controlling pigweeds in wheat stubble. Does anyone really think that exposing pigweeds to multiple shots of 2,4-D or dicamba per year will result in less herbicide resistance? Wasn’t that the same strategy that gave us pigweeds that glyphosate doesn’t kill?  While rotating herbicide mode of action is definitely a wise strategy for preventing herbicide resistance, utilization of non-chemical weed control measures in addition to herbicides is probably even wiser.  To many people, this means going back to tillage. However, research has shown that pigweed germination and growth is enhanced by tillage. Tillage also has the obvious drawbacks of reduced soil moisture, reduced soil organic matter, and increased soil erosion.  So how can we possibly control pigweeds without herbicides or tillage?

One innovative method of aiding control of pigweeds in soybeans, as well as many other weeds, is to plant the soybeans no-till into the residue of a herbicide killed winter cereal cover like triticale or rye.  There are two mechanisms at work here. The first is a phenomenon called crop allelopathy, in which the rye or triticale residue contains chemical compounds that act like natural herbicides that suppress pigweeds but actually seem to stimulate soybeans. Scientists have identified three compounds found in rye and triticale that have this effect. While this may seem far-fetched to some, remember that the herbicide Callisto was derived from an extract of the Mexican bottlebrush or Callistemone plant.   The second mechanism takes advantage of the fact that soybeans are a legume and can make their own nitrogen, while weeds cannot.  If corn was the previous crop, and was fertilized for optimum yield, usually there is a substantial amount of carryover nitrogen left in the ground at the time of soybean planting. If left alone, this nitrogen delays the time until soybeans nodulate (soybeans must become nitrogen deficient to trigger nitrogen fixation) and feeds weeds.  Planting a winter cover crop of rye or triticale will scavenge this nitrogen and convert it into a mulch that can control soil erosion and conserve moisture in addition to controlling weeds. This nitrogen does not disappear, it eventually becomes available again as the mulch rots to benefit the crop after soybeans.  The mulch of a cover crop also prevents sunlight from reaching pigweed seeds, and if the mulch is thick enough pigweed seeds can actually starve to death before getting to sunlight. Soybeans, with their large seeds, can emerge through a fairly thick mulch.
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