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Did you know that a person weighing about 150 pounds contains 0.2 milligrams of gold? At the end of this video, you will learn something about the human body and gold that will blow your mind.

To prove this fact, who can answer the questions given below?

Question 1: How many dollars is 0.2 milligrams of gold worth? (Also mention the date as rates keep on fluctuating)

Question 2: Which mineral is present in the highest proportion in the human body and how much would it weigh in a person of about 150 pounds?

Question 3: Where is the gold present inside the human body? The gold is present inside the body in which form?

Question 4: How important is the presence of gold to the proper functioning of the human body?

Question 5: How can one prove whether gold is actually present inside the body and if yes then how much?
Fact - 18: Did you know that a person weighing about 150 pounds contains 0.2 milligrams of gold? At the end of this video, you will learn something about the human body and gold that will blow your mind. To prove this fact, who can answer the questions given below? Question 1: How many dollars is 0.2 milligrams of gold worth? (Also mention the date as rates keep on fluctuating) Question 2: Which mineral is present in the highest proportion in the...
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LASER Basics:Absorption, Spontaneous & Stimulated Emission process explained along with the basic concepts of Transition Probabilities in all in terms of density of radiation and Einstein Coefficients. Useful to clear understanding about the 3 different processes of LASER.
LASER Basics:Absorption, Spontaneous & Stimulated Emission process explained along with the basic concepts of Transition Probabilities in all in terms of density of radiation and Einstein Coefficients. Useful to clear understanding about the 3 different processes of LASER. #LASER #EMISSION
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Jordan Fallis

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Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is the very last treatment I used to restore my brain function after serious concussions, toxic mold exposure and multiple psychiatric prescriptions. And in my experience, it is one of the most efficient ways to boost brain function and improve mental health. Yet your doctor likely has no idea what it is.
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uma maheswar

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Neha Anand

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When it comes to our brains, does size really matter? One of the biggest myths about the brain is that bigger is always better. But what about those who si
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Future NDT

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Fabiana Bueno

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An international team led by researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has compiled and analyzed the largest aggregate collection of human protein-coding sequences to date.
 
An open-access catalog of tens of thousands of human exome sequences highlights the power of a very large genomic dataset in pinpointing genes linked to rare diseasesWritten By Anna Azvolinsky
compiled and analyzed the largest aggregate collection of human protein-coding sequences to date. the utility of the large dataset to identify rare disease–causing variants and genes that are particularly sensitive to mutational variation, including loss of function.
- The team, led by Monkol Lek, a research fellow in the MacArthur lab, found variants spaced around every eight base pairs, on average, within regions of the genome that are particularly prone to variation. The researchers often captured the same variant over and over, suggesting that the dataset is large enough that variants within these regions were becoming saturated. While the dataset is not large enough to see every possible genetic variant, at these particular sites, the team was able to capture about 63 percent of all possible synonymous variants. “I find that exciting, as it previews what is in store in the long future trajectory of this field as we sequence millions of human genomes,” said Shendure.
The large number of exomes allowed the researchers to find that 183 of 192 allelic variants previously categorized as pathogenic (but found at a relatively high frequency in the ExAC database) are likely benign.

The team also identified 3,230 genes that are particularly intolerant to mutation even when the second copy of the gene is wild-type. Seventy-two percent of these genes have not been linked to any known disease, demonstrating the ability of data from apparently healthy individuals to reveal genes that—when mutated—may contribute to disease.
read more:
http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/46823/title/Largest-Human-Genetic-Variation-Repository-Yet/
An open-access catalog of tens of thousands of human exome sequences highlights the power of a very large genomic dataset in pinpointing genes linked to rare diseases.
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Fabiana Bueno

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 Genes related to cell growth were unusually active, leading to more cells but fewer connections between them. This can cause faulty cell networks unable to properly transmit signals in the brain and enlarged heads during early development.
 
 Brain cells grow faster in children with some forms of autism due to distinct changes in core cell signaling patterns, according to research from the laboratory of Anthony Wynshaw-Boris, MD, PhD, chair of the department of genetics and genome sciences at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Rapid cell growth can cause early brain overgrowth, a common feature in 20-30% of autistic children. But, the genetics of autistic children vary making it difficult to pinpoint common mechanisms underlying the disease.
read more:
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/08/160826151744.htm
Skin cells derived from autistic donors grew faster than those from control subjects, and activated their genes in distinct patterns, scientists report. Genes related to cell growth were unusually active, leading to more cells but fewer connections between them. This can cause faulty cell networks unable to properly transmit signals in the brain and enlarged heads during early development, say the researchers.
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Can the fountain of youth be found in the form of a pill? That’s what startup Elysium Health believes. The company is led by its chief scientist and co-founder, Leonard Guarente, who heads the anti-aging center at MIT. It’s through his research and direction that Elysium is banking on this product having a positive impact …
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Check out our new youtube channel Omnipotent Microbes. Discover the amazing microbial world.
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCS8hfPlxrh9f0AwYk8g_q8w
#science   #microbiology   #bacteria   #microbes   #funscience   #popularscience   #education   #educational  
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Ihab A.

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14/24 Understanding Gravity: (Black Holes, Tides, and Curved Spacetime): Episode 14 The Falling Laboratory

https://vimeo.com/179757681

24 lectures, 30 minutes per lecture, taught by Prof. Benjamin Schumacher, Kenyon College Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin

Course Lecture Titles

01 The Strangest Force
02 Free Fall and Inertia
03 Revolution in the Heavens
04 Universal Gravitation
05 The Art of Experiment
06 Escape Velocity, Energy, and Rotation
07 Stars in Their Courses - Orbital Mechanics
08 What Are Tides? Earth and Beyond
09 Nudge - Perturbations of Orbits
10 Resonance - Surprises in the Intricate Dance
11 The Million-Body Problem
12 The Billion-Year Battle
13 From Forces to Fields
14 The Falling Laboratory
15 Spacetime in Zero Gravity
16 Spacetime Tells Matter How to Move
17 Matter Tells Spacetime How to Curve
18 Light in Curved Spacetime
19 Gravitomagnetism and Gravitational Waves
20 Gravity's Horizon - Anatomy of a Black Hole
21 Which Universe Is Ours?
22 Cosmic Antigravity - Inflation and Dark Energy
23 The Force of Creation
24 The Next Revolution
Understanding Gravity: (Black Holes, Tides, and Curved Spacetime) 24 lectures, 30 minutes per lecture, taught by Prof. Benjamin Schumacher, Kenyon College Ph.D.,…
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particelle elementari
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Un aspetto del mondo delle particelle reali che è totalmente inatteso alla luce della nostra esperienza degli oggetti quotidiani è il fatto che le particelle elementari si presentano in popolazioni di individui  universalmente identici., ogni elettrone che sia stato osservato, che provenisse dallo spazio esterno, o da un'esperimento da laboratorio, è risultato identico a tutti gli altri; tutti gli elettroni hanno la stessa carica elettrica, il medesimo spin,la medesima massa-almeno nei limiti  delle incertezze di misura: tutti si comportano allo stesso modo nell'interazione con le altre particelle. Noi non sappiamo perché le  particelle siano identiche in questo modo;potremmo benissimo immaginare un mondo  in cui gli elettroni fossero diversi, ognuno diverso da tutti gli altri, ma il risultato sarebbe un mondo intellegibile.
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Enrico Fermi
 
Fermi's golden rule_(regola d'oro di Fermi) Nel 1927 Dirac pubblica i primi lavori in cui estende sistematicamente le regole di quantizzazione dei sistemi meccanici ai campi elettromagnetici. Fermi approfondisce gli studi di questi lavori e durante l'inverno 1928-1929 decide, come fa spesso, di riformulare la teoria seguendo un approccio matematico a lui più familiare. Successivamente lavora a lungo per trovare una soluzione alle ben note difficoltà relative alle divergenze dell'elettrodinamica quantistica dovuta alla self-energia dell'elettrone puntiforme  e riempie interi quaderni di calcoli, senza successo. Nel corso di queste ricerche personali,  Fermi comunica regolarmente i suoi risultati ad allievi ed amici, come Amaldi, Majorana, Rasetti e Segrè. Questo metodo caratteristico di Fermi di lavorare su un problema teorico "in pubblico" e di insegnare allo stesso tempo gli permette di esprimere ad alta voce quello che sta pensando; nel frattempo, nello scrivere i risultati alla lavagna, non salta mai un passaggio, procede a velocità uniforme e senza esitazioni, ma facendo sistematici progressi, indipendentemente dalla difficoltà della trattazione. Tutto questo lavoro sull'elettrodinamica viene riassunto da Fermi in una serie di lezioni che tiene all'Istituto Poincarè  di  Parigi nel 1929 e, in forma più completa, alla scuola estiva di Ann Arbor all'Università di Michigan nel 1930. L'articolo di Fermi "Teoria quantistica delle radiazioni" pubblicato dalla "Review of Modern Physics" edel 1932, che fornisce le prime nozioni di  teoria dei campi, è una monografia su cui generazioni di ricercatori hanno imparato l'elettrodinamica. Da Hans Bethe  viene considerato "un esempio insuperabile di come si possa esporre con semplicità una materia così complessa". Eugene  Wigner commenta a proposito: "Nessuno che conoscesse così a fondo tutte le complicazioni della teoria avrebbe potuto scriverlo e nessuno avrebbe potuto evitare più abilmente tutte le complicazioni". Wigner e Victor Weisskopf si adopereranno per rendere rigorosa una regola di calcolo delle probabilità di transizione spontanea tra stati quantici che Fermi ricava con una matematica assai spregiudicata e che da lì in poi verrà chiamata  _Fermi's golden rule.
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Fabiana Bueno

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  physicists have suggested other novel approaches to understanding cancer. A number of physicists, including Ricard Solé of Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona, Jack Tuszynski of the University of Alberta, and Salvatore Torquato of Princeton University, have published theory papers suggesting ways that phase transitions could help explain aspects of cancer, and how experimentalists could test such predictions. read article by Quanta Magazine: https://www.quantamagazine.org/20160816-researchers-unpack-a-cellular-traffic-jam/
 
#Tumorigenesis - #Biophysics (article written By Gabriel Popkin)
Jammed Cells Expose the Physics of Cancer
"The subtle mechanics of densely packed cells may help explain why some cancerous tumors stay put while others break off and spread through the body."
The Jam Index
In the broadest sense, physical principles have been applied to cancer since long before physics existed as a discipline. The ancient Greek physician Hippocrates gave cancer its name when he referred to it as a “crab,” comparing the shape of a tumor and its surrounding veins to a carapace and legs.
But those solid tumors do not kill more than 8 million people annually. Once tumor cells strike out on their own and metastasize to new sites in the body, drugs and other therapies rarely do more than prolong a patient’s life for a few years.
Biologists often view cancer primarily as a genetic program gone wrong, with mutations and epigenetic changes producing cells that don’t behave the way they should: Genes associated with cell division and growth may be turned up, and genes for programmed cell death may be turned down. To a small but growing number of physicists, however, the shape-shifting and behavior changes in cancer cells evoke not an errant genetic program but a phase transition.
The phase transition — a change in a material’s internal organization between ordered and disordered states — is a bedrock concept in physics. Anyone who has watched ice melt or water boil has witnessed a phase transition. Physicists have also identified such transitions in magnets, crystals, flocking birds and even cells (and cellular components) placed in artificial environments.
But compared to a homogeneous material like water or a magnet — or even a collection of identical cells in a dish — cancer is a hot mess. Cancers vary widely depending on the individual and the organ they develop in. Even a single tumor comprises a mind-boggling jumble of cells with different shapes, sizes and protein compositions. Such complexities can make biologists wary of a general theoretical framework. But they don’t daunt physicists. “Biologists are more trained to look at complexity and differences,” said the physicist Krastan Blagoev, who directs a National Science Foundation program that funds work on theoretical physics in living systems. “Physicists try to look at what’s common and extract behaviors from the commonness.”
In a demonstration of this approach, the physicists Andrea Liu, now of the University of Pennsylvania, and Sidney Nagel of the University of Chicago published a brief commentary in Nature in 1998 about the process of jamming. They described familiar examples: traffic jams, piles of sand, and coffee beans stuck together in a grocery-store hopper. These are all individual items held together by an external force so that they resemble a solid. Liu and Nagel put forward the provocative suggestion that jamming could be a previously unrecognized phase transition, a notion that physicists, after more than a decade of debate, have now accepted.
Though not the first mention of jamming in the scientific literature, Liu and Nagel’s paper set off what Fredberg calls “a deluge” among physicists. (The paper has been cited more than 1,400 times.) Fredberg realized that cells in lung tissue, which he had spent much of his career studying, are closely packed in a similar way to coffee beans and sand. In 2009 he and colleagues published the first paper suggesting that jamming could hold cells in tissues in place, and that an unjamming transition could mobilize some of those cells, a possibility that could have implications for asthma and other diseases.
read more:
https://www.quantamagazine.org/20160816-researchers-unpack-a-cellular-traffic-jam/
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Arttu Rajantie
Scientists searching for magnetic monopoles - fundamental magnetic particles - have shown they could detect them if they are produced at the LHC.
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Science Lover

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A video which puts the different cosmic scales into perspective 
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