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Fabiana Bueno

Discussion  - 
 
The pIgR protein is best known for attaching to antibodies and ferrying them from the bloodstream to the interior of the intestines, where the antibodies can neutralize pathogens. In mammals such as humans, the group discovered that pIgR looks like five round beads—biologists call these regions "domains"—that are connected to form a tightly closed, triangle-shaped loop. The group also showed that upon encountering an antibody, the pIgR molecule opens up—like changing from a fist to an open hand—to enclose around the antibody and to transport it into the intestines. (https://www.caltech.edu/news/multitasking-protein-keeps-immune-system-healthy-51946)
 
#Caltech #NEWS
The polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, or pIgR, is a multitasking protein produced in the lining of mucosal surfaces, such as the intestines. It plays a pivotal role in the body's immune functions by sequestering bacteria and by assisting antibodies—large proteins that can identify and neutralize specific bacteria and viruses. Now, scientists at Caltech have determined the three-dimensional structure of pIgR, providing important insights into how the protein keeps the immune system running smoothly.

Beth Stadtmueller, a postdoctoral scholar in the laboratory of Centennial Professor of Biology Pamela Björkman, is the first author on two recent papers describing the findings.
-read more :
https://www.caltech.edu/news/multitasking-protein-keeps-immune-system-healthy-51946
Caltech researchers have shed light on the 3-D structure of a protein crucial to immune system function.
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Fabiana Bueno

Discussion  - 
 
"This paper presents significant results that will influence our thinking about the way that RNA and DNA could have interacted in primitive life," says David Deamer, at the University of California, Santa Cruz, US (source: https://www.chemistryworld.com/news/nucleic-acid-instability-challenges-rna-world-hypothesis/1017458.article)
 
Early life may have contained both RNA and DNA, rather than just RNA
According to the RNA world hypothesis, early life used RNA to carry genetic information and perform biochemical catalytic reactions. Over time, DNA developed from RNA as the carrier of genetic information and proteins appeared as biochemical catalysts.

As RNA gave way to DNA, some think a mixture of nucleotide building blocks would have been inevitable. As these nucleotides connected to form strands, the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of pure RNA and DNA duplexes would drive these nucleic acids to accumulate in primitive cells, while less thermally stable complexes containing one strand of RNA and one strand of DNA fell apart.

Ramanarayanan Krishnamurthy, at the Scripps Research Institute, and colleagues wondered if duplexes where each strand contains both RNA and DNA nucleotides were stable enough to have been possible intermediates during the transition from RNA to DNA. The researchers purchased commercially synthesised sequences of RNA and DNA, six to 16 bases long. In some sequences, they systematically changed purine RNA nucleotides, containing the bases adenine or guanine, into the corresponding DNA purines. In others, they changed pyrimidine RNA nucleotides, with cytidine or uracil bases, into pyrimidine DNA nucleotides with cytidine or thymidine bases. The result was several series of nucleic acid duplexes that ranged from having all RNA nucleotides to none at all.
To test the thermal stability of these sequences, the researchers heated each duplex to separate the strands. Then they measured the increase in UV absorption as the strands melted. The faster the absorption increased as the temperature increased, the faster the strands separated, indicating a less stable duplex. Many mixed duplexes with strands containing both RNA and DNA nucleotides melted as much as 20 degrees before pure RNA or pure DNA duplexes, indicating they were significantly less thermally stable than the pure duplexes.

Krishnamurthy says they were surprised to see this instability trend hold for a variety of sequences. Without ways to prevent these mixed sequences from forming or primitive catalysts to overcome their instability, the researchers imagine that the most efficient path to pure RNA and pure DNA duplexes would start from a mixture of both nucleotides, rather than that nucleotide mixture developing from a pool of pure RNA.

- read more : https://www.chemistryworld.com/news/nucleic-acid-instability-challenges-rna-world-hypothesis/1017458.article
Early life may have contained both RNA and DNA, rather than just RNA
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How does RNA changes hands before matching, I mean compatible DNA?
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Fabiana Bueno

Discussion  - 
 
String theory today looks almost fractal. The more closely people explore any one corner, the more structure they find. Some dig deep into particular crevices; others zoom out to try to make sense of grander patterns. The upshot is that string theory today includes much that no longer seems stringy. Those tiny loops of string whose harmonics were thought to breathe form into every particle and force known to nature (including elusive gravity) hardly even appear anymore on chalkboards at conferences. At last year’s big annual string theory meeting, the Stanford University string theorist Eva Silverstein was amused to find she was one of the few giving a talk “on string theory proper,” she said. A lot of the time she works on questions related to cosmology.
(https://www.quantamagazine.org/20160915-string-theorys-strange-second-life/)
 
The Strange Second Life of String Theory - String theory has so far failed to live up to its promise as a way to unite gravity and quantum mechanics. At the same time, it has blossomed into one of the most useful sets of tools in science.

read article here:

http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/09/the-strange-second-life-of-string-theory/500390/?__hstc=13887208.8452a64a3333bc8eae956c0e8302cf50.1474901153914.1474901153914.1474901153915.2&__hssc=13887208.3.1474901153915&__hsfp=1194106991
The theory failed to unite gravity and quantum mechanics. But it still has become one of the most useful tools in science.
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Fabiana Bueno

Discussion  - 
 
scientists have discovered that a gene called PIEZO2 controls specific aspects of human touch and proprioception, a "sixth sense" describing awareness of one's body in space.
 
National Institutes of Health : With the help of two young patients with a unique neurological disorder, an initial study by scientists at the National Institutes of Health suggests that a gene called PIEZO2 controls specific aspects of human touch and proprioception, a "sixth sense" describing awareness of one's body in space. Mutations in the gene caused the two to have movement and balance problems and the loss of some forms of touch. Despite their difficulties, they both appeared to cope with these challenges by relying heavily on vision and other senses.
read more:
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160922101214.htm
With the help of two young patients with a unique neurological disorder, scientists have discovered that a gene called PIEZO2 controls specific aspects of human touch and proprioception, a "sixth sense" describing awareness of one's body in space. Mutations in the gene caused the two to have movement and balance problems and the loss of some forms of touch. Despite their difficulties, they both appeared to cope with these challenges by relying he...
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Fabiana Bueno

Discussion  - 
 
SwissCube’s long lifespan is a tribute to the 200 or so students who worked in succession on the project under the guidance of Muriel Richard, an engineer at eSpace. Over the years, a number of decisions that were considered highly risky at the time proved to be judicious. This includes the use of low-cost components that had never before been used in space. The little satellite, orbiting at an altitude of 720 kilometers and a speed of nearly 7,500 meters per second – 28,000 kilometers per hour – still regularly transmits its position, system status and images back to Earth. That said, the satellite had to be completely rebooted on two separate occasions in recent years owing to system failures. The CubeSat rebooted properly both times, offering further proof of its sound design. source: http://actu.epfl.ch/news/swisscube-seven-years-in-space-and-still-active/
 
#SwissCube - The little Swiss satellite was launched on 23 September 2009 and continues to send back regular reports. That ranks it among the oldest nanosatellites that are still active. Enthusiasts will be able to follow the satellite using a soon-to-be released mobile app.

It has circled the Earth nearly 38,000 times, sent back 150 million reports, transmitted dozens of megabytes of data and stood up surprisingly well to the damaging effects of solar particles on the electronic components. SwissCube, the little satellite developed by EPFL in partnership with several other specialized universities, is celebrating seven years in space today. EPFL's Space Engineering Center, eSpace, is planning a series of birthday events: a reunion of the satellite’s designers, conferences, personal accounts, previously unseen videos, and the retransmission of one of the satellite’s overhead passes. Plus, a mobile app will soon be available for those interested in keeping tabs on the satellite.

There is good reason to celebrate. This little CubeSat – measuring only 10 cm x 10 cm – is now playing with the big boys: it’s the oldest European satellite in its category to still be active. Only four other CubeSats have lasted longer, and they are all of Japanese design. The world record holder has been in orbit for 13 years.

Early on, no one thought SwissCube had the stamina. When it was launched, it was expected to function for about four months. And it even got off to a bad start: when it reached orbit it started spinning and couldn’t be used until it stabilized several months later.
- read more: http://actu.epfl.ch/news/swisscube-seven-years-in-space-and-still-active/



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Thank You
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Fabiana Bueno

Discussion  - 
 
The COOLAIR project is a collaboration with plant epigenetics leader Dean and a team of the John Innes Centre, UK. The Los Alamos team developed the COOLAIR the structures and Dean’s team, including first author Emily Hawkes, performed mutations on living plants to help validate the structures.
 
A special stretch of ribonucleic acid (RNA) called COOLAIR is revealing its inner structure and function to scientists, displaying a striking resemblance to an RNA molecular machine - by LOS ALAMOS National Laboratory:
A special stretch of ribonucleic acid (RNA) called COOLAIR is revealing its inner structure and function to scientists, displaying a striking resemblance to an RNA molecular machine, territory previously understood to be limited to the cells’ protein factory (the ‘ribosome’) and not a skill set given to mere strings of RNA.
- read more:
http://www.lanl.gov/discover/news-release-archive/2016/September/09.21-plant-memories.php
A special stretch of ribonucleic acid (RNA) called COOLAIR is revealing its inner structure and function to scientists, displaying a striking resemblance to an RNA molecular machine.
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Fabiana Bueno

Discussion  - 
 
A significant discovery has shaken the mathematical world: Prime numbers are not actually random. Apart from two and five, every single prime number finishes with either one, three, seven, or nine. If there was no arrangement, then the chance of having two consecutive primes ending with either number should constantly be 25 percent, but that's not always the case.

Kannan Soundararajan and Robert Lemke Oliver of Stanford University in California have revealed that in the first 100 million prime numbers, a prime ending in one is followed by another ending in one 18.5 percent of the time, by three 29.7 percent, by seven 30 percent, and by nine 21.8 percent. In other words, the prime's final number is most likely not to be repeated. read more:http://sci-techuniverse.blogspot.com/2016/06/mathematicians-discovered-something.html
 
A significant discovery has shaken the mathematical world: Prime numbers are not actually random. Apart from two and five, every single prime number finishes with either one, three, seven, or nine. If there was no arrangement, then the chance of having two consecutive primes ending with either number should constantly be 25 percent, but that's not always the case.

Kannan Soundararajan and Robert Lemke Oliver of Stanford University in California have revealed that in the first 100 million prime numbers, a prime ending in one is followed by another ending in one 18.5 percent of the time, by three 29.7 percent, by seven 30 percent, and by nine 21.8 percent. In other words, the prime's final number is most likely not to be repeated.
A significant discovery has shaken the mathematical world: Prime numbers are not actually random. Apart from two and five, every s...
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Expt-5 Viva Questions & Description of Susceptibility Experiment and Supporting Physical Concepts
Viva Questions:
1. What is susceptibility?
2. What is magnetization and how it can be achieve?
3. Does an atom with one electron in outer shell can behave like a bar magnet? or simply does an atom can be equivalent to the bar magnet?
4. What is atomic dipole?
5. How to find the atomic dipole element?
6. What is magnetic field induction and magnetic field intensity, how you will define it and what is the relationship between them?
7. How do you see magnetic field density in a region of magnetic field by bar magnet?
8. What is the unit of magnetic field induction (density) and magnetic field intensity and from which letters we represent to them?
9. What is the role of external magnetic field in magnetization of the material, how atomic dipole moments of atoms plays the role in the magnetization?
10. Can you explain the types of magnetic material (Dimagnetic, Paramagnetic, Ferromagnetic, Anti ferromagnetic) on the basis of atomic dipole moments.
11. In which unit you measure the magnetic field intensity H, meniscus height h in your observation?
12. Does you have plot the graph between h and H^2, if yes where you will use the slope of this graph and why?
13. In which unit system you calculated the value of susceptibility, SI or CGS?
14. What is g in the susceptibility formula and unit of it?
15. What is Gauss Probe and for what purpose we use it?
16. What is an electromagnet, how do we use it to magnetize the material?
17. Why the FeCl3 liquid in Quinke's tube rise or fall in the presence of external magnetic field?
18. Does magnetic field intensity will increase after increasing the current of an electromagnet?
19. What signifies value of the susceptibility in your experiment?
20. Can you determine the susceptibility value of iron piece from Quinke's method?
Does an atom with one electron in outer shell can behave like a bar magnet? or simply does an atom can be equivalent to the bar magnet? 4. What is atomic dipole? 5. How to find the atomic dipole element? 6. What is magnetic field induction and magnetic field intensity, how you will define it and ...
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Fabiana Bueno

Discussion  - 
 
Applications in the distant future might protect healthy human cells from cancer treatment or cosmic rays, says the scientist.
 
Genetic Engineering - transferring gene into animals might increase their resistance to radiation damage
#Tardigrades , also known as water bears or moss piglets, are tiny, eight-legged creatures that live in small bodies of water in habitats such as moss across the planet and are renowned for their extreme survival skills.

They can survive in the vacuum of outer space, withstand temperatures ranging from close to absolute zero to nearly 100°C, cope with pressures six times greater than those at the bottom of the deepest ocean and survive dehydration and being frozen for years on end.
They can also defy hefty amounts of radiation that would be lethal to most other life on the planet – and now we know how they do it.

It is mainly down to a bizarre protective protein they evolved that somehow shields their DNA from radiation damage. Short for “Damage suppressor”, Dsup appears to work by physically cuddling up to DNA and cocooning it from harm, but without disrupting its normal functions.

It may also help by somehow mopping up DNA-damaging agents called reactive oxygen species.
Kunieda and his colleagues discovered Dsup after sequencing the genome of Ramazzottius varieornatus, one of the most stress-tolerant tardigrade species. To their surprise, the protein also protected human kidney cells against radiation damage when the cells were genetically engineered to make Dsup themselves.
Kunieda says that transferring the Dsup gene into animals through genetic engineering might increase their resistance to radiation damage, although this would be trickier to do in a whole animal than in lab cultures of individual cells.

- read more the article written By Andy Coghlan:
https://www.newscientist.com/article/2106468-worlds-hardiest-animal-has-evolved-radiation-shield-for-its-dna/
Tough ‘water bears’ defy intense radiation by apparently wrapping their genetic material in a bizarre protein that can also protect human cells
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Good job
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Fabiana Bueno

Discussion  - 
 
Researcher Rachel E. Bean (Astronomy) will also be looking for evidence of the effects of dark matter and dark energy—two components of the universe that we cannot see
 
Cornell University: What happened a trillionth of a second after the Big Bang? The CMB—an early universe remnant—may have the answer, leading to the theory of everything. (article written by Jackie Swift)
Mystery shrouds the birth of our universe. In a fraction of a second, the universe transformed from a size smaller than a subatomic proton through expanding exponentially faster than the speed of light, according to the Big Bang theory. At the heart of this event lies the explanation for all the constituents of the cosmos today. If the moment of the Big Bang can be understood, we may finally have the theory of everything that can reconcile the quantum Standard Model of particle physics with Einstein’s general theory of relativity, which holds that gravity is a result of the curvature of space and time.

Even the most powerful particle physics experiments on Earth don’t have enough clout to recreate the conditions in the early universe. We can find evidence of them, however, in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), which functions like a fossil remnant of that very early universe, says Rachel E. Bean, Astronomy. The CMB was made about 400 thousand years after the start of the universe, she says. It’s a pristine glimpse of what the universe was like at that instant, and buried inside that signal is a signature of what happened a trillionth of a second after the Big Bang.
The Early Universe and the Cosmic Microwave Background

The CMB is a faint glow in the microwave wavelength that can be seen with telescopes that detect microwave radiation in the space between stars and galaxies. It has been traveling toward us for 13 billion years carrying information about those early moments. At that time the universe was governed by quantum physics at a level that we don’t think we fully understand, Bean says. As we go back in time, the universe gets smaller, hotter and denser. At its very earliest instances, it was at temperatures and densities that we can never recreate on earth.

In an effort to understand physics at those extreme properties, Bean looks for tiny temperature fluctuations in the CMB. These were generated a trillionth of a second after the Big Bang during a process called primordial inflation when the universe is thought to have expanded faster than the speed of light for a brief time. “We have to describe how quantum properties behave with gravity and space and time_, says Bean. We don’t know how to do that. The only way we can try to figure this out is to look at these very early moments. Bean hopes to connect these temperature fluctuations in the CMB to one of the potential theories—especially string theory—that are candidates to reconcile quantum mechanics and the general theory of relativity.

The CMB can also tell scientists about the effects of gravity on objects through time.

The CMB has essentially seen everything that has been created since it was formed,” says Bean. “It traveled through the universe as it evolved, and as it did that it had the signatures of that history imbued upon it.
Massive Galaxy Clusters, Dark Matter, and Dark Energy

Bean is interested in the information the CMB carries about its travels through the most massive objects in the universe: galaxy clusters. These are about a thousand times larger than our galaxy. As the CMB passes through a cluster, the heat of the cluster and its movement leaves a sort of Doppler shift on the frequency of the light from the CMB. We can use the CMB as a motion detector for these clusters, Bean explains. We can see how fast they were moving when the CMB passed through them. This is useful because those clusters were moving because of the properties of gravity at that time.
- read more : https://research.cornell.edu/news-features/space-between-stars-and-galaxies
What happened a trillionth of a second after the Big Bang? The CMB—an early universe remnant—may have the answer, leading to the theory of everything.
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May Kacharava

Discussion  - 
 
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Fabiana Bueno

Discussion  - 
 
The results demonstrate that LMs are a platform for fully integrable and atomically precise devices for quantum photonics technologies.
 
Incorporating single-photon sources into optoelectronic circuits is a key challenge to develop scalable quantum-photonic technologies
Article Abstract:
Transition metal dichalcogenides are optically active, layered materials promising for fast optoelectronics and on-chip photonics. The study demonstrate electrically driven single-photon emission from localized sites in tungsten diselenide and tungsten disulphide. To achieve this, we fabricate a light-emitting diode structure comprising single-layer graphene, thin hexagonal boron nitride and transition metal dichalcogenide mono- and bi-layers. Photon correlation measurements are used to confirm the single-photon nature of the spectrally sharp emission. These results present the transition metal dichalcogenide family as a platform for hybrid, broadband, atomically precise quantum photonics devices.

- read article here: http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2016/160926/ncomms12978/full/ncomms12978.html
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Fabiana Bueno

Discussion  - 
 
University of Oslo: new cells into the human brain and that these specific cells produce dopamine themselves. As a consequence, the brain could provide itself with the medicine it needs.This self-producing dopamine factory is steered by remote control, making it possible to customize the medication to the specific needs of the patient.
 
New medicine may have a big impact on the treatment of different kinds of brain disease
Patients suffering from Parkinson, Huntington, ALS, Alzheimer’s and Epilepsy can experience substantial positive effects from medication using dopamine or other neurotransmitters – organic chemicals that transmit nerve impulses inside the brain.
Dopamine through remote control
Imagine it was possible to operate brand new cells into the human brain and that these specific cells produce dopamine themselves. As a consequence, the brain could provide itself with the medicine it needs.

Imagine also that this self-producing dopamine factory is steered by remote control, making it possible to customize the medication to the specific needs of the patient.
It all sounds very Science Fiction, but this is nevertheless the objective of a European research imitative where scientists from UiO and Oslo University Hospital (OUS) are participating.

Recently they received the backing of an EU research initiative named Horsiont 2020. Professor Jenny Emnéus at Denmark Technical University (DTU) is head of the project.
- The scientists at DTU are in the world elite in creating cells that produce dopamine, says Professor in electronics Ørjan G. Martinsen at the Department of Physics.

- The cells are cultivated on a rack of carbon and they start producing dopamine when illuminated by light.

- Right here is the key to controlling the dopamine production: Cells, optics and controlling electronics will simultaneously be operated into the patient’s brain.

– This is a fantastic opportunity to reach out to a new group of patients, says Håvard Kalvøy, head of research at department of Medical Technology at Oslo University Hospital.
If we succeed we can give a lot of people a better life. That is extremely motivating, Kalvøy exclaims.

- read more :
https://titan.uio.no/node/1898
The project European Training Network for Cell-based Regenerative Medicine (Training4CRM) is being run by DTU in Copenhagen. In addition to UiO, universities from Madrid, Lund, Milano and Barcelona are project participants, together with 3 industrial and 6 other partners.
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Fabiana Bueno

Discussion  - 
 
According the article: The advantages compared with conventional treatments with drugs are clear: far more targeted therapy, and as a result, fewer side effects. source:
https://www.ethz.ch/content/main/en/news-und-veranstaltungen/eth-news/news/2016/09/die-mikrodoktoren-in-unserem-koerper.html
 
Swiss Federal Institute of Technology #NEWS- ETH researchers are developing tiny, sophisticated technological and biological machines enabling non-invasive, selective therapies. Their creations include genetically modified cells that can be activated via brain waves, and swarms of microrobots that facilitate highly precise application of drugs.
Bradley Nelson’s medical microrobots are inspired by natural microorganisms
- Nelson isn’t a dreamer or a storyteller – he is Professor of Robotics and Intelligent Systems at ETH Zurich, and he has an international reputation for his micro- and nanorobots. He still holds the Guinness World Record for the “most advanced mini robot for medical use”. His robots are typically just a few micrometres in size and are inspired by nature. He derives models for his own micrometre-scale mechanical propul- sion systems by observing microorganisms and seeing, for example, how the flagellum – a sort of curly tail that aids in movement – works in bacteria. The robots get the energy to move from an external impulse, such as an electromagnetic field.

Although this vision seems to be science fiction, Nelson’s group is gradually making it a reality: in an in vivo experiment, they were able to accurately guide a swarm of 80,000 microrobots within a mouse to demonstrate the delivery of a model drug to targeted locations. Nevertheless, the researchers still have to resolve a number of questions before they can address the first set of applications in humans. The questions focus on materials and design: “When designing robots like this, we can’t rely on our intuition because, on this small a scale, materials often behave differently than we are used to,” explains Nelson. Special 3D printers have expanded the range of materials used in microrobot design, going beyond semiconductor metals to include polymers. As a result, last year Nelson’s team in collaboration with Professor Christofer Hierold’s team was able to create a robot from a biocompatible biopolymer that dissolves in the body after completing its task.
- According the researcher:
“In future, the electricity for activating the lamp – and thus the protein production – could also come from a smartphone or a watch,” predicts Fussenegger. This would open up completely new possibilities for the doctor patient relationship: a doctor in the US could control the insulin level of a diabetes patient who is currently traveling in Europe by activating the production of the designer cells over the internet. At least, that’s one vision of medicine in the coming age of the internet of things.
- Read more:
https://www.ethz.ch/content/main/en/news-und-veranstaltungen/eth-news/news/2016/09/die-mikrodoktoren-in-unserem-koerper.html
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MORIO MONUEL GOMES
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Fabiana Bueno

Discussion  - 
 
Skinterface is just one development in the field of VR. Other developments include emotion tracking, as well as eye-tracking tech.
 
#Skinterface - Behold Skinterface - a virtual reality suit that allows its user to feel a range of sensations in the virtual world. The suit is equipped with vibrating nodes that simulates "feeling" things virtually.
- VR Headsets or goggles are standard to today’s virtual reality experience. If you want an upgrade, you can use dynamic controllers or even a suit to make yourself move in the virtual world. But imagine being able to “feel” in virtual reality – that’s something graduate students of the Royal College of Art (RCA) in London have been working on.
- The team has designed Skinterface, a high-tech suit that uses nodes which respond to input from sound waves. All over the suit are magnetic nodes, that can be programmed to vibrate to simulate different sensations, depending on the sound sent to the node. The sound activates magnets located at each node that can vibrate in different intensities bring a realistic full-body touch sensation.
- read more:
http://futurism.com/with-the-skinterface-suit-now-you-can-feel-virtual-reality/
Behold Skinterface - a virtual reality suit that allows its user to feel a range of sensations in the virtual world. The suit is equipped with vibrating nodes that simulates "feeling" things virtually.
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Fabiana Bueno

Discussion  - 
 
An extremely fragile, ancient Hebrew scroll has been digitally unwrapped for the first time, revealing the earliest copy ever found of an Old Testament Bible scripture, researchers said Wednesday. Known as the En-Gedi scroll, it contains text from the Book of Leviticus, and dates at least to the third or fourth century, possibly earlier, according to the report in the journal Science Advances. The deciphering of its contents is described in the journal as a "significant discovery in biblical archeology." Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-09-digitally-unwrapped-scroll-reveals-earliest.html#jCp
 
An extremely fragile, ancient Hebrew scroll has been digitally unwrapped for the first time, revealing the earliest copy ever found of an Old Testament Bible scripture, researchers said Wednesday.

Known as the En-Gedi scroll, it contains text from the Book of Leviticus, and dates at least to the third or fourth century, possibly earlier, according to the report in the journal Science Advances.
An extremely fragile, ancient Hebrew scroll has been digitally unwrapped for the first time, revealing the earliest copy ever found of an Old Testament Bible scripture, researchers said Wednesday.
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Fabiana Bueno

Discussion  - 
 
Her work involves three different aspects of research:
- making stem cells develop into dopamine-producing nerve cells, which can be inserted into the brains of patients who suffer from Parkinson’s, and thus have low levels of the signal substance dopamine
- reprogramming skin cells directly into dopamine cells, without having to go through a stem cell stage
- inserting genes into the brain to perform such reprogramming on the spot, and making, for example, glial cells (a type of connective tissue) convert into dopamine cells.
 
Is it possible to convert a patient’s own skin cells into functioning nerve cells? Or insert healthy genes to reprogram the cells of a damaged brain? Stem cell researcher Malin Parmar at Lund University in Sweden is studying these types of issues, in close collaboration with clinical researchers. She is now awarded a prize of SEK 100 000 from the Eric K. Fernström Foundation for her work.
read article here:
http://www.news-medical.net/news/20160921/Lund-University-stem-cell-researcher-awarded-Fernstrom-prize-for-study-on-repairing-damaged-brain.aspx
Is it possible to convert a patient’s own skin cells into functioning nerve cells? Or insert healthy genes to reprogram the cells of a damaged brain? Stem cell researcher Malin Parmar at Lund University in Sweden is studying these types of issues, in close collaboration with clinical researchers.
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Welcome to the #blausenmedical FREE ACCESS #digitalhealth & #science library of over 1500 videos and so much more. Check out an amazing 3D visual learning experience in 21 languages @ blausen.com Dedicated to #meded4all! 
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